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854 Possible Causes for Myoclonic Jerking, Onset of Disease between 25 and 40 Years of Age, Poor Coordination of the Lower Extremity

  • Acute Cerebellar Ataxia

    Four weeks later he developed myoclonic jerks. Electroencephalogram showed characteristic periodic complexes time-locked with myoclonus.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The age of onset may vary between 40 - 80 years and the mean duration of ataxia between 3 - 25 years.[neuroweb.us] Other clinical signs include early falling and fine myoclonic jerks of the fingers /limb and can be elicited by tapping the limb.[neuroweb.us]

  • Cocaine Abuse

    Effects of cocaine abuse on the oral mucosa are still poorly defined. Herein, a case of an 18-year-old male patient with a 15-day history of persistent painful ulcers and aphthous lesions of unknown etiology and with no other remarkable manifestations, is presented. All of the laboratory tests performed showed to[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Onset of Disease between 25 and 40 Years of Age
  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    By the jerk-locked averaging method, a positive spike time-locked to the myoclonic jerk was demonstrated in four patients before 15-20 msec of myoclonic jerk.[ci.nii.ac.jp] Celiac disease (or gluten sensitive enteropathy): The age of onset may vary between 40 - 80 years and the mean duration of ataxia between 3 to 25 years.[neuroweb.us] ., adj myoclon ic. A single myoclonic arm or leg jerk is normal when the person is falling asleep. Myoclonic jerks are severe with grand mal seizures.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

    Missing: Poor Coordination of the Lower Extremity
  • Alcoholic Cerebellar Degeneration

    The age of onset may vary between 40 - 80 years and the mean duration of ataxia between 3 - 25 years.[neuroweb.us] Other clinical signs include early falling and fine myoclonic jerks of the fingers /limb and can be elicited by tapping the limb.[neuroweb.us] Celiac disease (or gluten sensitive enteropathy): Celiac disease affects 0.5-1% of the Caucasian population.[neuroweb.us]

  • Wilson Disease

    jerking similar to that seen in progressive myoclonic syndrome.[web.archive.org] Onset is slow and begins between 11 and 25 years of age. Signs and Symptoms In about 40 to 50% of patients, the disease first affects the central nervous system (CNS).[diagnose-me.com] Autonomic disturbances including postural hypotension, abnormal sweating, and sphincter and sexual dysfunction are frequently present. 33 Very rarely, teenage patients exhibit myoclonic[web.archive.org]

    Missing: Poor Coordination of the Lower Extremity
  • Adult-Onset Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia

    […] to manage her frequent myoclonic jerking.[jnnp.bmj.com] People with this type of ataxia share many characteristic symptoms including: frequent falls due to poor balance imprecise hand coordination postural or kinetic tremor of[en.wikipedia.org] The age of onset may vary between 40 - 80 years and the mean duration of ataxia between 3 - 25 years.[neuroweb.us]

  • Hypoglycemia

    In newborns, hypoglycemia can produce irritability, jitters, myoclonic jerks, cyanosis, respiratory distress, apneic episodes, sweating, hypothermia, somnolence, hypotonia[en.wikipedia.org]

    Missing: Onset of Disease between 25 and 40 Years of Age Poor Coordination of the Lower Extremity
  • Alzheimer Disease

    After 36 hours of donepezil remission, the frequency of the myoclonic jerks was sharply reduced. The patient remains asymptomatic after 6 months of follow-up.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Onset of Disease between 25 and 40 Years of Age Poor Coordination of the Lower Extremity
  • Acute Amphetamine Intoxication

    jerks Twitching Choreiform movements 3.[clinicaladvisor.com] Hallucinations Integumentary Diaphoresis Bruising and injuries Track marks Abscess Excoriation Gastrointestinal Abdominal pain Nausea/Vomiting Musculoskeletal Muscle rigidity Myoclonic[clinicaladvisor.com]

    Missing: Onset of Disease between 25 and 40 Years of Age Poor Coordination of the Lower Extremity
  • Restless Legs Syndrome

    Restless legs syndrome, also known as Willis-Ekbom disease, is a common neurological condition whose manifestation is affected by complex environmental and genetic interactions. Restless legs syndrome can occur on its own, mostly at a young age, or with comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Onset of Disease between 25 and 40 Years of Age Poor Coordination of the Lower Extremity