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324 Possible Causes for Non-Motile Bacteria, Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life

  • Streptococcal Infection

    These bacteria are aerotolerant and an extracellular bacterium, made up of non-motile and non-sporing cocci. It is clinically important for humans.[en.wikipedia.org] In newborns, if the GBS infection develops in the first week of life, it is termed early onset disease.[medicinenet.com] If the GBS infection develops from 1 week to 3 months of age, it is referred to as late onset disease.[medicinenet.com]

  • Streptococcal Septicemia

    […] are infected within the first week of life, it is called early-onset GBS disease.[sepsis.org] According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), GBS is the leading cause of meningitis and sepsis in a newborn’s first week of life. ( Sepsis and Children ) If babies[sepsis.org] If they become sick from 7 days old to 3 months or more, it is called late-onset GBS disease.[sepsis.org]

  • Klebsiella

    The non-motile bacteria are lactose-fermenting, facultative anaerobes that proliferate at 37 C and produce characteristically mucoid colonies on carbohydrate- rich media,[intechopen.com] Genus Klebsiella; non-motile Gram-negative rods ‘He feels an overgrowth of Candida Albicans, which allows klebsiella bacteria to enter the blood stream, is the main culprit[en.oxforddictionaries.com] Cell Structure and Metabolism Klebsiella are non-motile, rod-shaped, proteobacteria that possess a prominent polysaccharide capsule.[microbewiki.kenyon.edu]

    Missing: Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life
  • Moraxella Catarrhalis

    Back Home Publications Journal of Medical Microbiology Volume 46, Issue 5 Article Navigate this Journal About Editorial Board Latest Articles Current Issue Archive Browse Submit an Article Received: 02/10/1996 Accepted: 22/10/1996 Cover date: 01/05/1997 Abstract Fulltext Figs (0) References (0) Cited By (52)[…][doi.org]

    Missing: Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life
  • Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus

    In newborns, if the GBS infection develops in the first week of life, it is termed early onset disease.[medicinenet.com] If the GBS infection develops from 1 week to 3 months of age, it is referred to as late onset disease.[medicinenet.com]

  • Chlamydia Infection

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association of condom use with chlamydia infection in men attending a large sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic in Australia. STUDY: Computerized records for all attendances between July 2002 and June 2003 were included and separate analyses were performed for men reporting[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life
  • Gonorrhea

    Gonorrhea is the most prevalent communicable disease in the United States and the incidence of anorectal involvement is high. Anorectal gonorrhea may be clinically elusive making the radiologic findings crucial in suggesting the diagnosis. Edematous rectal mucosa with limited distensibility and small ulcerations are the[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life
  • Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    BACKGROUND: The serotype-specific effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) against pneumococcal pneumonia has not been established in people aged 65 years or older. We assessed the effectiveness of PPV23 in this population. METHODS: For this multicentre, prospective study, we[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life
  • Haemophilus Influenzae Pneumonia

    Genus Haemophilus• Small, Non motile, Non sporing• Oxidase test positive• Pleomorphic• Gram Negative Dr.T.V.Rao MD 7 8.[slideshare.net] Haemophilus Influenza• Aerobic gram-negative bacteria• Polysaccharide capsule• Six different serotypes (a-f) of polysaccharide capsule• 95% of invasive disease caused by type[slideshare.net]

    Missing: Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life
  • Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

    Staphylococcus aureus is a type of bacteria. It stains Gram positive and is non-moving small round shaped or non-motile cocci.[news-medical.net]

    Missing: Onset in First Weeks or Months of Life

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