Create issue ticket

29 Possible Causes for Nonbilious Projectile Vomiting

  • Pyloric Stenosis

    Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis Age Usually manifests at 2-8 weeks of life Clinical Nonbilious projectile vomiting with progression over a period of several weeks after birth[learningradiology.com] The primary symptom is regurgitation progressing to nonbilious, projectile vomiting, which occurs intermittently or after feeding.[amboss.com] The typical infant presents with nonbilious projectile vomiting and dehydration (with hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis) if the diagnosis is delayed.[emedicine.com]

  • Acquired Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis

    The typical infant presents with nonbilious projectile vomiting and ...[weightssimpson.tk] Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis Age Usually manifests at 2-8 weeks of life Clinical Nonbilious projectile vomiting with progression over a period of several weeks after birth[learningradiology.com] Editorial Note: IHPS is a hypertrophy of the pyloric muscle that usually results in nonbilious, projectile vomiting that begins at about 3.5 weeks of age (2).[cdc.gov]

  • Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis

    The infant presented with nonbilious projectile vomiting at 4 weeks of age.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Infants with hypertrophic pyloric stenosis typically present at 2 to 4 weeks of age with nonbilious projectile vomiting.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis Age Usually manifests at 2-8 weeks of life Clinical Nonbilious projectile vomiting with progression over a period of several weeks after birth[learningradiology.com]

  • Congenital Pyloric Stenosis

    Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis Age Usually manifests at 2-8 weeks of life Clinical Nonbilious projectile vomiting with progression over a period of several weeks after birth[learningradiology.com] Clinical Manifestations Nonbilious vomiting is the initial symptom of pyloric stenosis.[clinicalgate.com] Observation of abdominal peristalsis with projectile nonbilious vomiting, and palpation of a mobile pyloric mass (the “olive”) is pathognomonic.[basicmedicalkey.com]

  • Partial Pyloric Obstruction

    Nonbilious vomiting is the initial symptom of IHPS.[consultant360.com] Observation of abdominal peristalsis with projectile nonbilious vomiting, and palpation of a mobile pyloric mass (the “olive”) is pathognomonic.[basicmedicalkey.com] PATIENT PRESENTATION Typically, an infant with IHPS will have a period of normal feeding for the first two to three weeks of life, followed by onset of nonbilious vomiting[mdedge.com]

  • Infantile Colic

    projectile vomiting; more common in boys; presents at two to six weeks of age Clinical dehydration, palpable pyloric mass or “olive” in right midepigastrium, visualization[web.archive.org] […] required in uncomplicated reflux; 24-hour pH monitoring may be used for complicated reflux; endoscopy for persistent symptoms Pyloric stenosis Normal appetite, progressive nonbilious[web.archive.org]

  • Intestinal Obstruction

    , projectile vomiting Intestinal malrotation/volvulus: sudden-onset, bilious vomiting with acute abdomen symptoms Hirschsprung disease: failure to pass stool in first days[unboundmedicine.com] Pseudoobstruction (Ogilvie syndrome) Volvulus Pediatric Considerations In young children and infants, consider: Pyloric stenosis: infant 3 to 6 weeks of age with postprandial, nonbilious[unboundmedicine.com]

  • Pylorospasm

    Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis Age Usually manifests at 2-8 weeks of life Clinical Nonbilious projectile vomiting with progression over a period of several weeks after birth[learningradiology.com] It typically presents in infants in the first 3 to 6 weeks of life as nonbilious vomiting, which has become projectile in character, leading to dehydration as the obstruction[appliedradiology.com]

  • Antral G-Cell Hyperplasia

    nonbilious vomiting - as bile enters duodenum (after the pylorus!)[alancam.com] Bubble" peritoneum amnion Pyloric stenosis Congenital hypertrophy of pyloric smooth muscle M F Stenosis develops due to thickened muscle Present 2 weeks after Stenosis occurs Projectile[alancam.com]

  • Infantile Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis 1

    Signs and symptoms of Pediatric Pyloric Stenosis: Nonbilious projectile vomiting after 3 weeks of age The “happy vomiter” May have palpable olive in right upper quadrant or[lecturio.com] The typical infant presents with nonbilious projectile vomiting and dehydration (with hypochloremic hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis).[omicsonline.org] The primary symptom is regurgitation progressing to nonbilious, projectile vomiting, which occurs intermittently or after feeding.[amboss.com]

Further symptoms