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13 Possible Causes for Nystagmus Decreases on Convergence, Spastic Gait

  • Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    For many subjects with an ATL1 mutation, spastic gait begins in early childhood and does not significantly worsen, even over many years; such cases resemble spastic diplegic[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The nystagmus diminished briefly after blinks and horizontal saccades, and decreased during eccentric gaze and convergence.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Characteristic clinical features comprise progressive spastic gait, cognitive impairment, and ataxia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Oculodentodigital Dysplasia

    gait to moderate to severe spastic tetraparesis/quadriplegia with epilepsy and an abnormal brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging result.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Less frequent ocular findings are nystagmus, palpebral fissure hypoplasia, epicanthal folds and convergent strabismus.[orpha.net] DISCUSSION This patient presented in our movement clinic with spastic gait disturbance.[e-jmd.org]

  • Communicating Hydrocephalus

    Mild dementia, spastic gait and hyperreflexia were observed on neurological examinations.[webview.isho.jp] The ocular motility disorder consisted of severe vertical gaze palsy and convergence retraction nystagmus.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The severity of the core clinical picture with predominant sensory ataxia, gait apraxia, lower limb spasticity, cognitive impairment and bladder dysfunction correlated with[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Hereditary Nystagmus

    ; Ataxic gait; Spasticity of the lower limbs; Hyperreflexia, especially of the lower limbs; Areflexia of the upper limbs; Upper limb weakness; Neck pain; Arm pain; Cranial[genome.jp] Nystagmus may decrease when the eyes converge to read.[lowvision.org] […] intensity decreases when converging to view near objects in around 44% of individuals with IN. 8,12 However, there is no significant improvement in near VA at this time,[dovepress.com]

  • Autosomal Dominant Congenital Nystagmus 3

    Gait ataxia, dysarthria, nystagmus, partial complex and generalized motor seizures, tremor, spasticity, Mexican families SCA11 (autosomal dominant type 11) 15q14-q21.3 Slowly[bcm.edu] Clinical Characteristics Ocular Features: The nystagmus is horizontal in type and accentuated by fixation and decreased by convergence.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu] It is typically a horizontal jerk nystagmus and it may be associated with abnormal head movement and decreases in intensity with convergence.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

  • Infantile Periodic Alternating Nystagmus

    The most frequent neurologic signs are cerebellar gait and limb ataxia in 70%, and dysarthria. Dystonia and spasticity are less common (18, 19, 21).[neuroophthalmology.ca] All patients showed gaze-evoked nystagmus (GEN) and reversed optokinetic nystagmus. In 2 patients (patient 1 and 4), the nystagmus decreased on convergence.[nature.com] Subsequently he lost acquired capabilities such as walking and sitting, developed spastic paresis, and finally became bedridden.[web.peacelink.it]

  • Autosomal Dominant Congenital Nystagmus 7

    Gait ataxia, dysarthria, nystagmus, partial complex and generalized motor seizures, tremor, spasticity, Mexican families SCA11 (autosomal dominant type 11) 15q14-q21.3 Slowly[bcm.edu] Clinical Characteristics Ocular Features: The nystagmus is horizontal in type and accentuated by fixation and decreased by convergence.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu] Congenital nystagmus remains horizontal in vertical gaze and usually is decreased at near with convergence.[medtextfree.wordpress.com]

  • Infantile Symmetrical Thalamic Degeneration

    Enlarged head circumference ( 4 SD) became apparent at age 6 months, and at 2 years, he developed ataxic gait, tremors, and spasticity.[plaza.umin.ac.jp] In 7% nystagmus actually increases in upgaze and decreases in downgaze (1273,1275,1278).[neuroophthalmology.ca] The most frequent neurologic symptoms are dementia, seizures, impaired balance, retropulsion, gait apraxia, spasticity, ataxia, and urinary incontinence.[ulf.org]

  • Autosomal Dominant Congenital Nystagmus Type 4

    Gait ataxia, dysarthria, nystagmus, partial complex and generalized motor seizures, tremor, spasticity, Mexican families SCA11 (autosomal dominant type 11) 15q14-q21.3 Slowly[bcm.edu] Another use of prisms is for convergence stimulation (base out prismin front of both eyes) so that the decreased nystagmus intensity with induced convergence may increase[omicsonline.org] It is typically a horizontal jerk nystagmus and it may be associated with abnormal head movement and decreases in intensity with convergence.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

  • Progressive Loss of Visual Acuity

    gait Distal sensory impairment Hypogonadism Limb muscle weakness Generalized amyotrophy Mental deterioration Ophthalmoplegia Global developmental delay Abnormality of eye[mendelian.co] Management options of congenital nystagmus include full correction of refractive error, contact lenses, base-out prism or minus lenses to stimulate convergence, yoked prism[opt.uh.edu] […] paraplegia Myopia Progressive sensorineural hearing impairment Intention tremor Sensorimotor neuropathy Leber optic atrophy Hyporeflexia Abnormal electroretinogram Spastic[mendelian.co]

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