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65 Possible Causes for Overweight Later in Life

  • Malnutrition

    Low birthweight is a risk factor for child stunting, which in turn is associated with overweight and obesity later in life.[fao.org] Overweight increases the risk of diet-related noncommunicable diseases later in life.[data.unicef.org] […] and obesity when faced with energy-dense diets and a sedentary lifestyle later in life.”[fao.org]

  • Insulin Resistance

    […] ages of life in both overweight and normal weight women who have PCOS.[ovarian-cysts-pcos.com] Therefore, measures to decrease this condition may have to be considered earlier to decrease the potential risks of developing diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease at later[ovarian-cysts-pcos.com]

  • Obesity

    […] or obese have increased risk of obesity, non-communicable diseases, premature death and disability later in life In many countries, childhood obesity exists alongside undernutrition[thousanddays.org] As obese children also tend to be obese in later life, it is important for parents to set the right example for their children from an early age.[healthdirect.gov.au] Obesity and overweight in middle age as measured by body mass index and skinfold thickness were strongly associated with risk of dementia in later life.[dx.doi.org]

  • Osteoarthritis

    Osteoarthritis can also run in families and injuries such as a broken bone or sporting injury can lead to osteoarthritis later in life.[arthritisaction.org.uk] Being overweight puts extra strain on the weight-bearing joints, especially the knees and hips and this can lead to more severe osteoarthritis.[arthritisaction.org.uk] No-one knows exactly what causes osteoarthritis but it may be due to repeated small injuries that happen as part of daily life and which don’t heal completely.[arthritisaction.org.uk]

  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Being overweight, particularly around the tummy. These problems in turn may also increase your risk of having a stroke and heart disease in later life.[patient.info] Many women are also overweight or obese and have an increased risk of developing metabolic syndromes in later life.[doi.org] However, it is particularly important for women with PCOS, as they may have extra risk factors for health problems in later life.[patient.info]

  • Diabetes Mellitus

    The metabolic environment of the developing fetus may also create a predisposition for diabetes later in life.[web.archive.org] It generally occurs later in life, in those who are obese, sedentary, and over 45 years of age.[labtestsonline.org] Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes People who develop type 2 diabetes are more likely to have the following characteristics: age 45 or older overweight or obese physically inactive[web.archive.org]

  • Hypercholesterolemia

    It also reduces the risk of becoming overweight or obese and developing NCDs later in life.[who.int] For infants and young children In the first 2 years of a child’s life, optimal nutrition fosters healthy growth and improves cognitive development.[who.int]

  • Acanthosis Nigricans

    Children who develop acanthosis nigricans are at a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.[healthline.com] It’s most common in those who are overweight, have darker skin, and have diabetes or prediabetic conditions.[healthline.com]

  • Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

    The metabolic environment of the developing fetus may also create a predisposition for diabetes later in life.[web.archive.org] Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes People who develop type 2 diabetes are more likely to have the following characteristics: age 45 or older overweight or obese physically inactive[web.archive.org]

  • Diabetic Nephropathy

    Some developing countries face the paradox of families in which the children are underweight and the adults are overweight.[content.nejm.org] […] in life through the acquisition of a “thrifty” phenotype that, when accompanied by rapid childhood weight gain, is conducive to the development of insulin resistance and[content.nejm.org] This combination has been attributed by some people to intrauterine growth retardation and resulting low birth weight, which apparently confer a predisposition to obesity later[content.nejm.org]

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