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288 Possible Causes for Paroxysmal Activity - Generalized Spikes, Slow-Frequency High-Amplitude Waves with High-Frequency Polyspikes, Variable Psychomotor Retardation

  • Myoclonic-Astatic Epilepsy

    retardation mainly affecting speech.[ipfs.io] generalized paroxysmal fast activity or focal spikes.[jamanetwork.com] Boys (74%) are more often affected than girls (Doose and Baier 1987a). [2] Prognosis Epilepsy with myoclonic-astatic seizures has a variable course and outcome.[ipfs.io]

  • West Syndrome

    […] clinical manifestations such as hypotonia, psychomotor retardation, and feeding difficulties.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Leigh syndrome (LS) (sub-acute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy) is characterized by symmetric brain lesions occurring mainly in the basal ganglia and associated with variable[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Epilepsy

    […] waves, multifocal discharges, generalized paroxysmal fast activity, diffuse slowing slow background, generalized spike waves MRI normal normal vermis hypoplasia, cisterna[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] waves-slow waves; (poly)spike waves; paroxysmal fast activity slow background, diffusemultifocal sharp waves and sharp waves-slow waves; paroxysmal fast activity Neurological[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] waves, PPR irregular generalized spike waves, PPR not specified generalized slow spike waves and runs of fast spikes not specified generalized (poly)spike waves, slow spike[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation
  • Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy

    Generalized spike-wave discharges and diffuse paroxysmal fast activity were categorized as interictal and ictal, based on duration of less than 10 seconds or greater, respectively[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation
  • Generalized Clonic or Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    ‘Contrary to popular folk belief, nothing should be placed in the mouth during the seizure. Severe injury could occur.’ Generalized tonic clonic seizures (grand mal seizures) are the most common and best known type of generalized seizure. They begin with stiffening of the limbs (the tonic phase), followed by jerking[…][epilepsynw.org]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation
  • Benign Adult Familial Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Abstract Benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy (BAFME) has been mapped to chromosome 8q23.3-q24.1, 2p11.1-q12.1, 5p15.31-p15.1, and 3q26.32-3q28, in Japanese, Italian, Thai, and French pedigrees, respectively. Recently, we investigated a Chinese BAFME family. Clinical and electrophysiological studies revealed that nine[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation
  • Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is a common form of epilepsy mainly characterized by myoclonic jerks, but affected individuals may also experience generalized tonic-clonic seizures and absence seizures. Symptom onset typically occurs around puberty and although the disease persists into adulthood, patients do respond[…][symptoma.com]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation
  • Juvenile Absence Epilepsy

    Multiunitary activity analysis of cortical and subcortical structures in paroxysmal discharges and grand mal seizures in photosensitive baboons.[academic.oup.com] Generalized spike and wave discharges and nonspecific thalamic nuclei. Arch Neurol 1969 ; 19 : 174 –83. Silva-Barrat C, Menini C, Bryere P, Naquet R.[academic.oup.com] Relations between cortical and thalamic cellular events during transition from sleep patterns to paroxysmal activity. J Neurosci 1995 ; 15 : 623 –42.[academic.oup.com]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation
  • Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Characteristic interictal electrographic discharges include generalized paroxysmal fast activity and slow spike and wave, which we have previously shown recruit widespread[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Interictal EEG showed findings characteristic of LGS: generalized slow spike-wave complexes, multifocal sharp waves, generalized polyspikes and paroxysmal fast activity during[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] OBJECTIVE: To use EEG-fMRI to determine which structures are critically involved in the generation of paroxysmal fast activity (PFA) and slow spike and wave (SSW) (1.5-2.5[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation
  • Early Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy Type 3

    paroxysms and generalized slow spike-and-wave discharges Affected LGS patients have different degrees of developmental delay and they often develop autism and intellectual[centogene.com] […] tonic–clonic seizures The onset of LGS is mostly between 3-5 years of age 43 The incidence of LGS is estimated to be 1-10% of all childhood-onset epilepsies 43 EEG shows fast activity[centogene.com]

    Missing: Variable Psychomotor Retardation