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30 Possible Causes for Paroxysmal Activity - Sharp-Waves

  • Epilepsy

    […] background, diffusemultifocal sharp waves and sharp waves-slow waves; paroxysmal fast activity Neurological examination mild diffuse hypotonia, mild ataxia with wide based[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] discharges, diffuse (poly)spikes not available slow background, diffuse slow spike-wave discharges, sharp waves-slow waves; (poly)spike waves; paroxysmal fast activity slow[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] hypsarrhythmia Course of EEG slow background, slow generalized spike-wave discharges and multifocal (poly)spikes slow background, left temporal slowing, slow generalized spike-wave[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Vascular Dementia

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a general term describing problems with reasoning, planning, judgment, memory, and other thought processes caused by brain damage from impaired blood flow to the brain. Cognitive rehabilitation and physical therapy are the mainstays of dementia treatment, although often ineffective[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Encephalitis

    Encephalitis is inflammation of the brain. Severity is variable. Symptoms may include headache, fever, confusion, a stiff neck, and vomiting. Complications may include seizures, hallucinations, trouble speaking, memory problems, and problems with hearing.Causes of encephalitis include viruses such as herpes simplex virus[…][en.wikipedia.org]

  • Rolandic Epilepsy

    Rolandic epilepsy, sometimes also referred to as benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, is the most common type of childhood epilepsy. Spontaneous remission before puberty is observed in the majority of cases. Characteristic RE seizures are hemifacial motor seizures, sometimes also motorsensory[…][symptoma.com]

  • Panic Attacks

    Focal paroxysms of sharp wave activity appeared on both patients' EEGs coincident with the spontaneous onset of panic attack symptoms. Both patients remained conscious.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The correlation of focal paroxysmal EEG changes with panic attack symptoms suggests that these attacks were produced by partial seizure activity.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease

    Prion diseases are unique transmissible neurodegenerative diseases that have diverse phenotypes and can be familial, sporadic, or acquired by infection. Recent findings indicate that the PrP genotype and the PrP(Sc) type have a major influence on the disease phenotype in both sporadic and familial human prion[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Periventricular Leukomalacia

    The evolution of severe periventricular leukomalacia was followed by ultrasonography in three newborn infants, and the subsequent myelination of the brain was assessed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Four stages of periventricular leukomalacia could be identified by ultrasonography; (1) initial congestion,[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Fragile X Syndrome

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of cognitive deficiency in humans and perhaps the best-understood single cause of autism. A trinucleotide repeat expansion, inactivating the X-linked FMR1 gene, leads to the absence of the fragile X mental retardation protein. FMRP is a selective RNA-binding[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    , including the slow-wave complex, polyspikes, runs of rapid spikes, sharp waves, sharp-and-slow-wave complex, slow sharp waves, spikes and spike and slow waves.[jove.com] Use both interictal paroxysmal and ictal activities to approximately locate the ictogenic areas by identifying the electrodes/channel where epileptogenic elements appear 23[jove.com]

  • Lafora Disease

    The EEG record showed background theta activity as well as slow and sharp waves with a paroxysmal tendency.[jnnp.bmj.com] The first EEG record, carried out the day after admission, showed slightly slow background activity with bursts of slow waves and paroxysms of spikes and waves.[jnnp.bmj.com] Intermittent photic stimulation induced generalised discharges of slow and sharp waves with bursts of spike and polyspike wave complexes in occipital regions.[jnnp.bmj.com]

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