Create issue ticket

211 Possible Causes for Pectus Excavatum in Males, S4 Gallop, Thick Wiry Hair

  • Craniofrontonasal Dysplasia

    wiry hair, and occasionally cleft lip and/or palate.[genedx.com] wiry hair with orbital asymmetry and strabismus. 5 The extracranial features include multiple skeletal malformations, such as sloping shoulders, dysplastic clavicles, thoracic[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] , wiry, and curly hair at 2-3 months Defects in formation of toes and fingers, broad fingers and toes, curved last finger Increased webbing in between the fingers and toes[dovemed.com]

    Missing: S4 Gallop
  • Cardiomyopathy

    gallop due to thickened, non-compliant ventricle Possible murmur from mitral regurgitation Rapidly rising double arterial pulse in the carotid arteries ECG Abnormally deep[amboss.com] The patient presented dysmorphic features and skeletal deformities of hands and feet, pectus excavatum, and cleft palate.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] is common in children but signifies decompensated CHF in adults; S4 is frequently heard Jugular venous pulse revealing a prominent a wave Double carotid arterial pulse Apical[emedicine.medscape.com]

    Missing: Thick Wiry Hair
  • Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    […] is common in children but signifies decompensated CHF in adults; S4 is frequently heard Jugular venous pulse revealing a prominent a wave Double carotid arterial pulse Apical[emedicine.com] One litter had 3 kittens: 1 with pectus excavatum, 1 stillborn fetus, and 1 male that developed HCM.[doi.org] […] impulse (less common) Normal first heart sound; second heart sound usually is normally split but is paradoxically split in some patients with severe outflow gradients; S3 gallop[emedicine.com]

    Missing: Thick Wiry Hair
  • Anemia

    Although many parts of the body help make red blood cells, most of the work is done in the bone marrow. Bone marrow is the soft tissue in the center of bones that helps form all blood cells. Healthy red blood cells last between 90 and 120 days. Parts of your body then remove old blood cells. A hormone called[…][nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Pectus Excavatum in Males Thick Wiry Hair
  • Hypertension

    Abstract Background: It has long been known that depression is associated with hypertension but whether depression is a risk factor for hypertension incidence is still inconclusive. Objectives: To assess whether depression increases the incidence of hypertension. Method: Literatures were searched from PubMed,[…][doi.org]

    Missing: Pectus Excavatum in Males Thick Wiry Hair
  • Congestive Heart Failure

    Cardiac palpation and auscultation for ventricular and atrial gallop rhythms (S3, S4) should be performed.[doi.org] The quality of the heart sounds, and the presence of atrial and ventricular gallops and valvular murmurs are important for diagnosis and clinical assessment.[doi.org]

    Missing: Pectus Excavatum in Males Thick Wiry Hair
  • Myocardial Infarction

    Heart sounds are auscultated for S3 or S4 gallops or new heart murmurs. Patient care and other activities should be organized to allow for periods on uninterrupted rest.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

    Missing: Pectus Excavatum in Males Thick Wiry Hair
  • Angina Pectoris

    A disorder characterized by substernal discomfort due to insufficient myocardial oxygenation. A heart condition marked by paroxysms of chest pain due to reduced oxygen to the heart. Angina is chest pain or discomfort you get when your heart muscle does not get enough blood. It may feel like pressure or a[…][icd9data.com]

    Missing: Pectus Excavatum in Males Thick Wiry Hair
  • Coronary Artery Disease

    Andrew E Moran 3, Greg Freedman 4, Rosana E Norman 2, 5, Nicolas JC Stapelberg 6, Amanda J Baxter 1, 2, Theo Vos 4 and Harvey A Whiteford 1, 2 BMC Medicine 2013 11 :250 Charlson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2013 Received: 10 July 2013 Accepted: 7 November 2013 Published: 26 November 2013 Abstract Background[…][doi.org]

    Missing: Pectus Excavatum in Males Thick Wiry Hair
  • Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a rare but fatal complication of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with an associated mortality that ranges from 41% to 80%. The treatment consists of supplemental oxygenation, afterload reduction, intraaortic balloon pump, and surgical repair. In selected patients, extracorporeal[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

    Missing: Pectus Excavatum in Males Thick Wiry Hair