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12 Possible Causes for Physiological Neonatal Jaundice, Vein Disorder, Yellow Discoloration of the Skin

  • Neonatal Jaundice

    […] through umbilical catherter/central venous line Isovolumetric exchange transfusion: simultaneously pulling blood out of umbilical arteryand pushing new blood to umbilical vein[epomedicine.com] Jaundice, Physiological NeonatalNeonatal Jaundice, Physiological — Severe Jaundice in Newborn — Severe Jaundice in Neonate — Icterus Gravis Neonatorum[mesh.kib.ki.se] Definition Neonatal jaundice is the yellowing discoloration of the skin and sclera of a neonate, which is caused by increased levels of bilirubin in the blood.[bestpractice.bmj.com]

  • Physiological Neonatal Jaundice

    […] through umbilical catherter/central venous line Isovolumetric exchange transfusion: simultaneously pulling blood out of umbilical arteryand pushing new blood to umbilical vein[epomedicine.com] Published on Jul 10, 2016 Physiological Neonatal Jaundice and Its causes. Physiological Neonatal Jaundice 1. PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE 10/07/2016 1 2.[slideshare.net] Definition (MSH) Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA.[fpnotebook.com]

  • Liver Cirrhosis

    […] history of alcohol excess, neonatal jaundice, hypertension, or hypercholesterolemia.[atsjournals.org] Yellow discoloration in the skin and eyes (jaundice) Fluid accumulation in your abdomen (ascites) Spiderlike blood vessels on your skin Redness in the palms of the hands[mayoclinic.org] The symptoms of alcoholic liver cirrhosis are similar to other alcohol-related liver disorders.[healthline.com]

  • Crigler-Najjar Syndrome Type 1

    The hepatocytes were safely infused through the portal vein, survived for more than 11 months, and partially corrected the metabolic disorder.[doi.org] Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] This leads to jaundice, i.e. yellow discoloration of skin and eyes. Excess bilirubin can also damage the brain, muscles, and nerves.[medindia.net]

  • Neonatal Hepatitis

    IVIG is a solution containing antibodies donated from healthy individuals and administered directly to a vein.[rarediseases.org] Infants with this condition are usually jaundiced. Jaundice that is caused by neonatal hepatitis is not the same as physiologic neonatal jaundice.[en.wikipedia.org] The common symptoms include jaundice (yellow discoloration of the skin and the whites of the eyes) and hepatomegaly (liver enlargement).[biology-online.org]

  • Extrahepatic Cholestasis

    If the underlying disorder causes hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis, portal hypertension with subsequent abdominal distention resulting from ascites, dilated abdominal veins,[merckmanuals.com] Whereas physiologic jaundice constitutes a common finding in neonates, a few cases present with cholestatic jaundice owing to various pathologic conditions, including extrahepatic[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] discoloration of the skin (jaundice), dark urine, and pale stools.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

  • Transient Familial Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    Primary biliary cholangitis Primary sclerosing cholangitis Primitive portal vein thrombosis Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis Progressive familial intrahepatic[se-atlas.de] Preferred Name Fetal and neonatal jaundice, NOS Synonyms Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS ID altLabel Physiologic jaundice in newborn, NOS Neonatal jaundice, NOS Foetal[purl.bioontology.org] Jaundice is a yellow discoloration of the skin and eyes caused by hyperbilirubinemia (elevated serum bilirubin concentration).[merckmanuals.com]

  • Neonatal Sepsis

    Prothrombotic disorders in abdominal vein thrombosis. Neth J Med 2012; 70: 400-5. Janssen HLA, Meinardi JR, Vleggaar FP, et al.[termedia.pl] We should consider UTI as a probable cause of jaundice and neonates certainly should be evaluated for UTI, if there was a history of worsening jaundice while physiologic jaundice[ijp.mums.ac.ir] Thrombophilic genotypes, natural anticoagulants, and plasma homocysteine in myeloproliferative disorders: relationship with splanchnic vein thrombosis and arterial disease[termedia.pl]

  • Biliary Atresia

    The result is portal hypertension (high blood pressure in the portal vein). This congenital disorder begins to progress very soon after birth.[chp.edu] Issues that should raise your concern: Prolonged neonatal jaundice Physiologic jaundice in healthy, full-term newborns typically resolves by the 5th or 6th day.[pedemmorsels.com] discoloration of the skin and whites of the eyes due to an abnormally high level of bilirubin (bile pigment) in the bloodstream, which is then excreted through the kidneys[beaumont.org]

  • Eng-Strom Syndrome

    Secondary conditions causing RLS include iron deficiency, varicose veins, and thyroid problems.[en.wikipedia.org] Physiological neonatal jaundice may peak at 85–170 µmol/l and decline to normal adult concentrations within two weeks. Prematurity results in higher levels.[en.wikipedia.org] Other complaints included a yellow-white discoloration of the skin associated with his symptoms.[amssm.org]