Create issue ticket

916 Possible Causes for Progressive Joint Contractures

  • Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome

    , progressive joint contractures, and growth failure.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] , optic atrophy, progressive joint contractures, and growth failure.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] joint contractures and wasting, and death in infancy or early childhood.[medlink.com]

  • Bruck Syndrome

    Clinical description Features include osteoporosis and bone fragility, progressive joint contractures sometimes associated with pterygia, wormian bones, scoliosis due to vertebral[orpha.net] joint contractures sometimes associated with pterygia, wormian bones, scoliosis due to vertebral deformities and short stature.[malacards.org] […] scoliosis (McPherson and Clemens, 1997). (259450) UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot : 75 Bruck syndrome 1: A disease characterized by generalized osteopenia, congenital joint contractures[malacards.org]

  • Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a heterogeneous symptom complex characterized by non-progressive joint contractures from birth that involve more than one part[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Abstract Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by non-progressive joint contractures from birth that involve more than[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Fetal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterised by non-progressive multiple joint contractures, which may result in fetal death, and is heterogeneous in origin[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Winchester Syndrome

    The syndrome is characterized by dissolution of carpal and tarsal bones with generalized osteoporosis, progressive joint contractures, short stature, peripheral corneal opacities[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] The syndrome is characterized by short stature, coarse face, corneal opacities, generalized osteolysis and progressive painful arthropathy with joint stiffness and contractures[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Intermittent polyarthralgia results in progressive joint contractures.[ped-rheum.biomedcentral.com]

  • Raynaud Phenomenon

    As the disease progresses, skin and subcutaneous tissue of the fingers become stiffer, joints become immobile, and contractures develop.[clinicalgate.com]

  • Arthritis

    Flexion contractures may require intensive exercise, casting, or immobilization (eg, splinting) in progressively more stretched-open positions.[merckmanuals.com] ) to restore muscle mass and preserve range of joint motion should not be fatiguing.[merckmanuals.com] […] prevented and muscle strength can be restored more successfully after inflammation begins to subside; active exercise (including walking and specific exercises for involved joints[merckmanuals.com]

  • Osteoarthritis

    Another characteristic symptom of the disease is the progressive incapacity of the joint to function, leading – in the long run – to loss of mobility.[oafifoundation.com] As the disease progresses, prolonged joint stiffness and joint enlargement are evident. Crepitus, or a grating sensation in the joint, is a late manifestation.[aafp.org] With the evolution of the disease deformations of the bones and muscular contractures can occur, aggravating the pain and atrophying the muscles that surround the joints.[oafifoundation.com]

  • Supination Injury

    […] to a fixed supination contracture as interosseous membrane stiffness, muscle shortening, and joint stiffness increases.10 The posture in forearm supination presents serious[kundoc.com] […] incidence of supination deformity occurs in 6% to 10% of children with residual brachial plexus birth injuries.8,9 Although the deformity starts as a dynamic deficit, it progresses[kundoc.com]

  • Short Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency

    , progressive joint contractures, lumbar lordosis, progressive external ophthalmoplegia with ptosis, and cataracts.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] […] cardiomyopathy, progressive joint contractures, lumbar lordosis, progressive external ophthalmoplegia with ptosis, and cataracts.[neurology.org] A 13.5-year-old girl presented with congenital-onset facial and neck weakness, slowly progressive severe limb girdle and axial myopathy, respiratory weakness, cardiomyopathy[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Polyarthritis

    […] and wrists, which rapidly progresses to flexion contracture of the hands.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Abstract A 64-year-old Japanese woman had rapidly progressing bilateral palmar contracture associated with severe pain on both palms over the previous 8 weeks, without a history[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] Palmar fasciitis and polyarthritis syndrome (PFPAS) is an uncommon disorder characterized by diffuse inflammation of the palmar fascia, tendon sheaths, and joints of the fingers[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Further symptoms