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28 Possible Causes for Thoracolumbar Gibbus Deformity

  • Mucopolysaccharidosis

    During the most recent 3-month follow-up visit, the patient was found to have complete resolution of his gibbus deformity and no changes with his neurologic exam.[surgicalneurologyint.com] Both demonstrate severe gibbus deformity centered at L1 causing moderate to severe bony spinal canal stenosis On physical examination, the patient was noted to be alert and[surgicalneurologyint.com] (a) MRI thoracolumbar spine, sagittal view. (b) CT thoracolumbar spine, sagittal view.[surgicalneurologyint.com]

  • Mucopolysaccharidosis 1H

    During the most recent 3-month follow-up visit, the patient was found to have complete resolution of his gibbus deformity and no changes with his neurologic exam.[surgicalneurologyint.com] Both demonstrate severe gibbus deformity centered at L1 causing moderate to severe bony spinal canal stenosis On physical examination, the patient was noted to be alert and[surgicalneurologyint.com] (a) MRI thoracolumbar spine, sagittal view. (b) CT thoracolumbar spine, sagittal view.[surgicalneurologyint.com]

  • Mucopolysaccharidosis 1

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS I) is a condition that affects many parts of the body. It is a progressively debilitating disorder; however, the rate of progression varies among affected individuals. MPS I is caused by mutations in the IDUA gene . These mutations lead to reduced levels or the complete lack of the IDUA[…][rarediseases.info.nih.gov]

  • Mucopolysaccharidosis 4

    What is Morquio A? Morquio A is a rare inherited disease that affects major organ systems in the body. The disease is a form of mucopolysaccharidosis, which is a type of lysosomal storage disorder. People born with Morquio A can’t break down certain complex carbohydrates known as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs)[…][biomarin.com]

  • Platyspondyly

    gibbus deformity (Levin et al. 1997) (Fig. 3.11).[rrnursingschool.biz] Mild thoracolumbar gibbus was noted, with hypoplasia of the first vertebral body (Fig. 3).[sajr.org.za] […] vertebral end-plates are irregular, but usually not notched, and tongue-like protrusions arise from the anterior wall of the vertebral body, especially at the apex of the thoracolumbar[rrnursingschool.biz]

  • Mucopolysaccharidosis 4A

    Homepage Rare diseases Search Search for a rare disease Mucopolysaccharidosis type 4A ORPHA:309297 Synonym(s): GALNS deficiency Galactosamine-6-sulfatase deficiency MPS4A MPSIVA Morquio disease type A Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase deficiency Prevalence: 1-5 / 10 000[…][orpha.net]

  • Spondyloepimetaphyseal Dysplasia - Abnormal Dentition Syndrome

    The hook-shaped vertebrae and gibbus deformity at the thoracolumbar junction (lower part of the picture) mimic the findings in Hurler syndrome Fig. 3.5.[rrnursingschool.biz] Vertebral abnormalities similar to, but milder than, those described above, including thoracolumbar gibbus deformity with ovoid, beaked vertebrae at the apex of the gibbus[rrnursingschool.biz] Note the typical hooks (lower arrows) projecting from the anteroinferior aspect of ovoid (upper arrows) vertebrae, and the gibbus deformity at the thoracolumbar junction.[rrnursingschool.biz]

  • Mucopolysaccharidosis 3

    MPS III is a mucopolysaccharide disease also known as Sanfilippo syndrome. It takes its name from Dr. Sylvester Sanfilippo, one of the U.S. doctors who described the condition in 1963. What causes this disease? Mucopolysaccharides are chains of sugar molecules used to build connective tissues in the body. “muco”[…][mpssociety.org]

  • Acquired Osteosclerosis

    gibbus deformity (Levin et al. 1997) (Fig. 3.11).[rrnursingschool.biz] […] vertebral end-plates are irregular, but usually not notched, and tongue-like protrusions arise from the anterior wall of the vertebral body, especially at the apex of the thoracolumbar[rrnursingschool.biz]

  • Parastremmatic Dwarfism

    gibbus deformity (Levin et al. 1997) (Fig. 3.11).[rrnursingschool.biz] […] vertebral end-plates are irregular, but usually not notched, and tongue-like protrusions arise from the anterior wall of the vertebral body, especially at the apex of the thoracolumbar[rrnursingschool.biz]

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