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12 Possible Causes for Wing Beating Tremor

  • Pallidopyramidal Syndrome

    Fbxo7/PARK15 has well-defined roles, acting as part of a Skp1-Cul1-F box protein (SCF)- type E3 ubiquitin ligase and also having SCF-independent activities. Mutations within FBXO7 have been found to cause an early-onset Parkinson's disease, and these are found within or near to its functional domains, including its[…][ingentaconnect.com]

  • Wilson Disease

    We report a WD patient who developed a unilateral wing-beating tremor 6years after OLT. New neurological symptoms develop immediately after OLT in most cases.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] A characteristic tremor described as "wing-beating tremor" is encountered in many people with Wilson's; this is absent at rest but can be provoked by extending the arms.Cognition[en.wikipedia.org] Joong-Seok Kim, Su-Young Kim, Jong-Young Choi, Hee-Tae Kim and Yoon-Sang Oh, Delayed appearance of wing-beating tremor after liver transplantation in a patient with Wilson[dx.doi.org]

  • Basal Ganglia Lesion

    Neuroradiol J. 2015 Feb;28(1):51-2. doi: 10.15274/NRJ-2014-10113. Author information 1 Department of Neurology, Hartford Hospital and University of Connecticut School of Medicine; Hartford, CT, USA pfinell@harthosp.org. Abstract This paper describes a diabetic dialysis patient presenting two episodes of symmetric basal[…][ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

  • Tic Disorder

    beating tremor, Dystonia HYPERREFLEXIA [LATAH,MYRIACHIT] CHILDHOOD Non-progressive Startle response,echolalia MYOCLONUS Any age, no vocalisations Variable Myoclonus TARDIVE[slideshare.net] […] limited Choreiform HUNTINGTON’S DISEASE Late onset[30-50], dementia, atrophy Progressive to death Choreiform WILSON’S DISEASE 10-25years,KF rings, liver fn Chelating agents Wing[slideshare.net]

  • Primary Orthostatic Tremor

    […] wrists) are usually present. 8, 20 WILSON DISEASE Wilson disease is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder that manifests in persons five to 40 years of age, sometimes with a “wing-beating[aafp.org] A “wing-beating” type of tremor known as the Holmes' tremor or rubral tremor occurs from cerebellar damage.[epainassist.com] Cerebellar damage can also produce a “wing-beating” type of tremor called rubral or Holmes’ tremor — a combination of rest, action, and postural tremors.[theneurologicalinstitute.com]

  • Gordon Holmes Syndrome

    Holmes tremor, first identified by Gordon Holmes in 1904, can be described as a wing-beating movement localized in the upper body that is caused by cerebellar damage. [1][en.wikipedia.org] Holmes tremor is a combination of rest, action, and postural tremors.[en.wikipedia.org]

  • Striatonigral Degeneration

    (e.g., “wing-beating” with arm abduction and elbow flexion) Choreathetosis Prominent psychiatric disturbances Brownish outer corneal deposits of copper (i.e., Kayser-Fleischer[brainaacn.org] BG Typical neurologic manifestations of Wilson’s disease include: Gradual onset dysarthria Dystonia (facial dystonia causing a wry smile called risus sardonicus) Rigidity Tremor[brainaacn.org]

  • Benign Familial Chorea

    (e.g., “wing-beating” with arm abduction and elbow flexion) Choreathetosis Prominent psychiatric disturbances Brownish outer corneal deposits of copper (i.e., Kayser-Fleischer[brainaacn.org] BG Typical neurologic manifestations of Wilson’s disease include: Gradual onset dysarthria Dystonia (facial dystonia causing a wry smile called risus sardonicus) Rigidity Tremor[brainaacn.org]

  • Arcus Juvenilis

    The characteristic tremor is coarse, irregular proximal tremulousness with a “wing beating” appearance.[bjmp.org] The most common presenting neurologic feature is asymmetric tremor.[bjmp.org]

  • Hereditary Essential Tremor 4

    The resulting tremor is sometimes termed "wing-beating" tremor. With midbrain pathology, a peculiar type of large, irregular, predominantly proximal tremor may occur.[the-medical-dictionary.com] In such cases, the tremor becomes most evident when the patient holds his or her hands in front of the chest with arms abducted and elbows flexed.[the-medical-dictionary.com]

Further symptoms