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Acute Contagious Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis Catarrhal Acute


Presentation

  • When an infection is present, the patient experiences itching, tearing, burning, pain and a mucopurulent discharge, along with the feeling of a foreign body in the eye. The conjunctiva becomes hyperemic, thus the common name of “pinkeye.”[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Critical Essential Core Tested Community Questions (3) (M2.OP.4868) A 22-year-old man presents to his primary care physician with itchy eyes.[medbullets.com]
  • However, such treatment resulted in rapid aggravation of catarrhal infiltrates at the corneal limbus. 2 Case presentation A 70-year-old woman presented to our hospital with ocular pain and redness of the left eye that had persisted for 3 days.[journals.lww.com]
  • 3 factors were present, 76.4% of patients had a negative culture, and when 4 factors were present, 92.3% of patients had a negative culture result. [1] Bilateral versus unilateral disease Bilateral disease is typically infectious or allergic.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Presents a detailed exposition of the growing number of techniques for lamellar keratoplasty , including outcomes. Includes new sections on the latest developments in the management of ocular surface disease.[books.google.ro]
Falling
  • Look at other dictionaries: acute contagious conjunctivitis — acute epidemic conjunctivitis a mucopurulent, epidemic type of conjunctivitis caused by Haemophilus aegyptius, occurring in the spring or fall, with the same symptoms as acute catarrhal conjunctivitis[medicine.academic.ru]
  • (The ointment falls away from the tube as you squeeze, so you just need good aim.) When your baby blinks, the ointment will go into her eye. If you're using drops, aim for the inside corner of your baby's eye.[babycenter.com]
  • You see tiny bubbles or dark spots slowly falling through your line of vision. Everyone has a few floaters - you should only worry if you notice a sudden increase in them.[medbroadcast.com]
  • Viral etiologies are more common than bacterial, and incidence of viral conjunctivitis increases in the late fall and early spring. Classification can also be based on age of occurrence or course of disease.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Burning Pain
  • When an infection is present, the patient experiences itching, tearing, burning, pain and a mucopurulent discharge, along with the feeling of a foreign body in the eye. The conjunctiva becomes hyperemic, thus the common name of “pinkeye.”[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
Infertility
  • Chlamydia, for example, often causes no genital symptoms, but can cause infertility and heart damage if left untreated.[medbroadcast.com]
Red Eye
  • It may reproduce with fidelity or with… … Medical dictionary Measles — An acute and highly contagious viral disease characterized by fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and a spreading skin rash.[medicine.academic.ru]
  • The differential diagnosis for red eye is broad because many ophthalmic conditions masquerade as conjunctivitis (Table). View this table: In this window In a new window Table.[pedsinreview.aappublications.org]
  • Most cases of a red eye that produces discharge will be diagnosed as conjunctivitis. Nevertheless, conjunctivitis is not the only cause of red eye.[superpharmacy.com.au]
  • Conjunctivitis must be differentiated from other, often more serious, causes of red eye.[infectiousdiseaseadvisor.com]
Blepharitis
  • Staphylococcus aureus and Moraxella lacunata may also cause chronic conjunctivitis in patients with associated blepharitis.[eyewiki.aao.org]
  • Conjunctivitis may be confused with blepharitis, which is inflammation of the edges of the eyelids.[southerncross.co.nz]
  • Most people who develop bacterial conjunctivitis, also have other eye conditions such as dry eyes or inflammation of the eyelids (blepharitis).[djo.harvard.edu]
  • Milder forms usually go for ten years or more without greater changes; more severe forms may cause blepharitis, eczema, eversion of the lower punctum lacrymale, ectropion , blepharophimosis, etc. It usually attacks adults.[chestofbooks.com]
  • In addition, the patient exhibited 1 blepharitis on both upper and lower eyelids. The anterior chamber exhibited 3 cellular reaction with mild cyclitic membrane formation (Fig. 1A and B).[journals.lww.com]
Excessive Tearing
  • The viral form of pink eye remains contagious until the eye is no longer red or producing excess tears.[quidel.com]
  • Conjunctivitis symptoms Conjunctivitis leads to: Eye irritation and redness Excessive tears in the eyes A discharge with pus Swelling of the eyelids Photophobia (you can’t tolerate looking into sunlight).[betterhealth.vic.gov.au]
  • Allergic conjunctivitis affects both eyes and causes itching and redness in the eyes, as well as excessive tearing.[averyrancheyecare.com]
  • Book a consultation Symptoms One or both eyes may be affected and symptoms can include: Redness Itchiness A gritty, uncomfortable feeling A discharge, which can form a crust during the night and make it difficult to open the eye in the morning Excessive[visioneyeinstitute.com.au]
  • Signs and symptoms of conjunctivitis If your child has conjunctivitis, they may have: a red or pink eye (or both eyes) redness behind the eyelid swelling of the eyelids, making them appear puffy excessive tears a yellow-green discharge from the eye which[rch.org.au]
Burning Eyes
  • eyes (especially in pink eye caused by chemicals and irritants) Blurred vision Increased sensitivity to light Cleveland Clinic News & More Cleveland Clinic News & More[my.clevelandclinic.org]
  • If you have pink eye, you might also: have tears have a discharge, usually yellow or green, and crusty lashes, usually worse on waking have itchy or burning eyes be sensitive to light Check your symptoms with healthdirect’s Symptom Checker to get advice[healthdirect.gov.au]
  • Green or white discharge from the eye Itchy eyes Burning eyes Blurred vision More sensitive to light Swollen lymph nodes (often from a viral infection ) When to Call Your Doctor Make the call if: There’s a lot of yellow or green discharge from your eye[webmd.com]
Conjunctival Hyperemia
  • Differential Diagnosis for Conjunctival Hyperemia (Red Eye) Because of its location (Fig. 1), the conjunctiva is exposed to numerous microorganisms, potential irritants, and allergens, all of which can cause conjunctivitis.[pedsinreview.aappublications.org]
  • Anterior segment examination often reveals mucous discharge, conjunctival hyperemia, and chemosis. Follicular reaction is a key feature of chlamydial conjunctivitis and typically involves the bulbar conjunctiva and semilunar folds.[webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu]

Workup

Neisseria Gonorrhoeae
  • Hyperacute conjunctivitis is primarily due to Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which is a sexually transmitted disease.[eyewiki.aao.org]
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes gonococcal conjunctivitis, which usually results from sexual contact with a person who has a genital infection.[msdmanuals.com]
  • Neonatal hyperacute purulent conjunctivitis caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae. FIGURE 4. Neonatal hyperacute purulent conjunctivitis caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae.[aafp.org]
  • gonorrhoeae in sexually active adults Can lead to vision loss if not treated promptly by an eye doctor [ 1 ] Chronic bacterial conjunctivitis Defined as symptoms lasting for at least 4 weeks Often happens along with blepharitis, inflammation of the eyelid[cdc.gov]

Treatment

  • […] status NCT02595606 Phase 4 0.3% Sodium Hyaluronate 16 Topical Cyclosporine for the Treatment of Dry Eye in Patients Infected With the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Unknown status NCT00797030 Phase 4 cyclosporine and sodium carboximethycellulose;sodium[malacards.org]
  • Here is a link to a website which describes a home treatment for pink eye: More discussions about acute contagious conjunctivitis[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Because toxicity may occur, treatment is rarely continued longer than two to three weeks—except with a corneal transplant patient in need of prolonged treatment.[reviewofoptometry.com]
  • Large medical need for treatment for EKC Survey among European ophthalmologists highlights that there is a large unmet medical need for treatment of EKC.[adenovir.com]
  • Treatment of conjunctivitis Conjunctivitis usually gets better within a week or two without any treatment. You can ask your pharmacist for advice on what might help ease your symptoms.[bupa.co.uk]

Prognosis

  • […] habitats The local healthcare providers and local public health authorities have to ensure that the residents of a region are generally well-informed and made aware of basic preventive measures and precautions to be taken during an AHC outbreak What is the Prognosis[dovemed.com]

Etiology

  • Etiology A. Predisposing factors 1. Chronic exposure to dust, smoke, and chemical irritants. 2. Local cause of irritation such as trichiasis, concretions, foreign body and seborrhoeic scales. 3.[ophthalmologylife.blogspot.com]
  • This study also investigated how it could be determined that conjunctivitis is not likely to be of bacterial etiology.[healio.com]
  • Physical Clues to the Etiology of Conjunctivitis The patient should be examined in a well-lit room.[aafp.org]
  • Discuss the most common etiologic agents of conjunctivitis in various age groups. Describe the clinical manifestations for various types of conjunctivitis. Determine appropriate treatment and whether ophthalmology referral is indicated.[pedsinreview.aappublications.org]
  • Physical examination may also include a visual acuity test to determine the condition’s effect on vision. 6,7 Table: Conjunctivitis Differentiating Features Etiology Discharge Eyelid Edema Node Involvement Itching Allergic Watery Mild/severe None Mild[pharmacytimes.com]

Epidemiology

  • Epidemiology In children, bacterial conjunctivitis is more common than viral Viral conjunctivitis is highly contagious Sites Bulbar and palpebral conjunctiva Clinical features Bacterial: itching, tearing, redness, purulent discharge, matting of eyelids[pathologyoutlines.com]
  • L.Z. and X.H. contributed to the epidemiological analyses and wrote the manuscript. X.J. and N.Z. were responsible for the viral laboratory analyses.[nature.com]
  • Epidemiology and diagnosis of acute conjunctivitis at an inner-city hospital. Ophthalmology. Aug 1989;96(8):1215-1220. Rietveld RP, ter Riet G, Bindels PJ, Sloos JH, van Weert HC.[superpharmacy.com.au]
  • Epidemiology and diagnosis of acute conjunctivitis at an inner-city hospital. Ophthalmol 1989;96:1215-1220. Katusic D, Petricek I, and Mandic Z, et al. Azithromycin vs. doxycycline in the treatment of inclusion conjunctivitis.[webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu]
  • Adenovirus conjunctivitis is a reportable infection in Germany and is classified as a Category IV infectious disease by Japan’s National Epidemiological Surveillance of Infectious Diseases (NESID) with mandated collection, analysis and publication of[adenovir.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Prevention

  • See also pinkeye. acute contagious conjunctivitis a contagious inflammation of the conjunctiva caused by Haemophilus aegypticus; secretions must be handled with extreme care to prevent its spread.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • This will prevent the spread of infection to other children. The incidence of conjunctivitis decreases with age.[betterhealth.vic.gov.au]
  • Blurred vision or sensitivity to light A gritty feeling in your eye Prevention The best way to prevent viral and bacterial conjunctivitis is to wash your hands frequently and avoid touching your eyes.[visionweb.com]
  • Good hygiene is extremely important, as it will help to prevent the spread of conjunctivitis.[visioneyeinstitute.com.au]

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