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Autoeczematisation

'id' Reaction


Presentation

  • Autoeczematization to a distant focus of dermatophyte infection very rarely presents as DDC.[ingentaconnect.com]
  • "Id Reaction (Autoeczematization) Clinical Presentation: History, Physical Examination, Causes". emedicine.medscape.com. Retrieved 2017-11-25. James, William; Berger, Timothy; Elston, Dirk (2005).[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Histology typically reveals spongiotic dermatitis that often is vesicular, and eosinophils may be present in the infiltrate. Read More Download full-text PDF Source[pubfacts.com]
  • Typically, the compound of the present invention is co-administered with a corticosteroid.[google.tl]
  • Presentation on theme: "Suzy Tinker CNS Paediatric Dermatology Homerton NHS Foundation Trust"— Presentation transcript: 1 Suzy Tinker CNS Paediatric Dermatology Homerton NHS Foundation Trust Tinea Capitis Suzy Tinker CNS Paediatric Dermatology Homerton[slideplayer.com]
Physician
  • Professor of Medicine (Dermatology), Chief, Division of Dermatology, University of Louisville School of Medicine Jeffrey P Callen, MD is a member of the following medical societies: Alpha Omega Alpha, American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Physicians[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • […] half day conference was planned with the Primary Care Physician in mind and will endeavour to provide education in dermatology focusing on practical diagnosis and management.[ubccpd.ca]
  • SH Board Certified Physician Doctoral Degree 6,399 satisfied customers I have been dealing with a persistent all over body itch for I have been dealing with a persistent all over body itch for that last three years.[justanswer.com]
  • […] stress Sweating Low humid conditions Change in temperature Soaps or detergents Dust or sand Wool or fabric clothing Cigarette smoke Living in cities where the pollution is high Foods like milk, soy, wheat or eggs One should consult a Dermatologist or a Physician[simplyknowledge.com]
Dermatitis
  • , Autosensitization dermatitis, Cutaneous autosensitisation, Cutaneous autosensitization, Id reaction, Sensitisation dermatitis, Sensitization dermatitis Spanish autoeccematizacion, autoeczematizacion, dermatitis por autosensibilizacion, dermatitis por[66.199.228.237]
  • , allergic contact dermatitis, acute irritant contact eczema and infective dermatitis have been documented as possible triggers, but the exact cause and mechanism is not fully understood. [7] Several other types of id reactions exist including erythema[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Diaper dermatitis is the most common cutaneous diagnosis in infants. Most cases are associated with the yeast colonisation of Candida or diaper dermatitis candidiasis (DDC).[ingentaconnect.com]
  • This stimulus may be a pre-existing or new dermatitis (most often on the lower leg), or skin infection with fungi, bacteria, viruses or parasites. The rash tends to occur at a site distant from the original infection or dermatitis.[bionicinterface.com]
  • Id reaction, also known as autoeczematization, is the development of dermatitis that is distant to an initial site of infection or sensitization.[pubfacts.com]
Blister
  • , itchy, symmetrical red rash occurring at least one to two weeks after the primary skin infection or dermatitis (sometimes months or even years later) - Variable rash: may be small raised spots, large red flat patches, or pus-filled vesicles (small blisters[bionicinterface.com]
  • Often intensely itchy, the red papules and pustules can also be associated with blisters and scales and are always remote from the primary lesion. [5] It is most commonly a blistering rash with itchy vesicles on the sides of fingers and feet as a reaction[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Appearance varies and includes blisters, bumps, crusted plaques (discoid eczema), follicular papules, morbilliform eruption, targetoid lesions and pompholyx(blisters on palms and soles).[naamanskinclinic.com]
  • Appearance varies and includes blisters, bumps, crusted plaques ( discoid eczema ), follicular papules, morbilliform eruption, targetoid lesions and pompholyx (blisters on palms and soles).[dermnetnz.org]
  • […] erythema and erosions where the napkin rubs, usually on waistband or thighs Candida albicans : erythematous papules and plaques with small satellite spots or superficial pustules Impetigo ( Staphylococcus aureus and/or Streptococcus pyogenes ): irregular blisters[gpdesknote.wordpress.com]
Eruptions
  • […] the NIH UMLS ( Unified Medical Language System ) Allergy-sensitivity to fungi syndrome ( C0343041 ) Concepts Disease or Syndrome ( T047 ) English Allergy-sensitivity to fungi syndrome, Dermaphytid, Dermatophytid, Dermatophytide, Epidermophytid, Ide eruption[66.199.228.237]
  • Clinical findings typically include an acute, intensely pruritic maculopapular or papulovesicular eruption that most frequently involves the extremities.[pubfacts.com]
  • Morbidity results from symptoms of the id reaction and the acute onset of the primary eruption.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • These include atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, dyshidrosis, photodermatitis, scabies and drug eruptions. [2] Treatment [ edit ] Id reactions are frequently unresponsive to corticosteroid therapy, but clear when the focus of infection or infestation[en.wikipedia.org]
Papule
  • Often intensely itchy, the red papules and pustules can also be associated with blisters and scales and are always remote from the primary lesion. [5] It is most commonly a blistering rash with itchy vesicles on the sides of fingers and feet as a reaction[en.wikipedia.org]
  • This common viral rash is characterised by waxy umbilicated papules of varying sizes that are widely distributed over the limbs and torso. Each papule contains a viral core that can be expressed.[medicinetoday.com.au]
  • Affected skin is in contact with the wet napkin and tends to spare the skin folds Chafing: erythema and erosions where the napkin rubs, usually on waistband or thighs Candida albicans : erythematous papules and plaques with small satellite spots or superficial[gpdesknote.wordpress.com]
  • Granuloma gluteale infantum: red or purple nodules Candida albicans : erythematous papules and plaques with small satellite spots or superficial pustules.[cosmoderma.healios.co.in]
  • Appearance varies and includes blisters, bumps, crusted plaques (discoid eczema), follicular papules, morbilliform eruption, targetoid lesions and pompholyx(blisters on palms and soles).[naamanskinclinic.com]
Urticaria
  • […] eczema and infective dermatitis have been documented as possible triggers, but the exact cause and mechanism is not fully understood. [7] Several other types of id reactions exist including erythema nodosum, erythema multiforme, Sweet's syndrome and urticaria[en.wikipedia.org]
  • […] and contact urticaria are rare adverse effects from topical DPCP Topical DPCP and SADBE do not cause significant blood abnormalities Topical DPCP may be used in the treatment of melanoma and vitiligo SADBE in acetone requires refrigeration True (not[brainscape.com]
  • Immunotherapy DIPHENCYPRONE • Diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) • Initial sensitization for 2-3 days with 2% patch • Then 0.001% to 2% • Mutagenic • S/E: contact urticaria, autoeczematisation, erythema multiformae, hyper & hypo pigmentation( dyschromia in[slideshare.net]
  • Contact Dermatitis 2007; 56:164-7. 2007 Williams JDL Moyle M and Nixon R Occupational contact urticaria from parmesan cheese Contact Dermatitis 2007; 56:113-4. 2007 Cahill J, Williams J, Nixon R.[occderm.asn.au]
  • Immediate contact urticaria is followed by acute and sometimes chronic dermatitis in the same site. Systemic contact dermatitis follows ingestion of a substance that has previously caused allergic contact dermatitis.[book-med.info]
Irritability
  • It is an irritating and inflammatory acute dermatitis in the perineal and perianal areas resulting from the occlusion and irritation caused by diapers. Autoeczematization to a distant focus of dermatophyte infection very rarely presents as DDC.[ingentaconnect.com]
  • Lower threshold for skin irritation 4. Spreading of infectious antigens causing a secondary response 5.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • […] cause of the id reaction is unknown, the following factors are thought to be responsible: (1) abnormal immune recognition of autologous skin antigens, (2) increased stimulation of normal T cells by altered skin constituents, [4, 5] (3) lowering of the irritation[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Also called: Dermatitis, Skin rashA rash is an area of irritated or swollen skin. Many rashes are itchy, red, painful, and irritated. Some rashes can also lead to blisters or patches of raw skin.[medicbind.com]

Treatment

  • […] is treated. [9] [5] : 81 Therefore, the best treatment is to treat the provoking trigger.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • A worsening of a pre-existing dermatitis caused by infection, scratching or inappropriate treatment often precedes autoeczematisation.[bionicinterface.com]
  • […] heart disease 1 niece with light psoriasis. psoriasis kopfhaut gel best elbows for treatment Symptoms of Moist Dermatitis. A plan of treatment for dyshidrotic eczema includes: Corticosteroid ointments or creams.[masca-project.eu]
  • Treatment of kerions The same treatment strategy for normal infections is used. However, it is more difficult to clear with 6-8 weeks of treatment. It is therefore recommended to continue therapy for 12-16 weeks.[patient.info]
  • Dead Sea Salt Treatment for Psoriasis & Eczema The natural treatment recreates the water conditions of the famous Dead Sea in the user’s bath tub. This rash requires treatment with medication.[ezdtech.eu]

Prognosis

  • Prognosis Prognosis is good once the inciting etiology has been identified and appropriately treated. Morbidity results from symptoms of the id reaction and the acute onset of the primary eruption.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • […] opportunistic bacterial infection occurs, antibiotics may be required. [2] Epidemiology [ edit ] With no particular affinity to any particular ethnic group, seen in all age groups and equally amongst males and females, the precise prevalence is not known. [2] Prognosis[en.wikipedia.org]
  • A patient who had borne two children both having eczema at an psoriasis and dying your hair prognosis arthritis early age during pregnancy produced a child healthy and no eczema ever followed.[edenbio.eu]
  • Prognosis [ 6 ] Continuous shedding of fungal spores may last several months even with active treatment. Keeping patients with tinea capitis out of school is impractical. The treatments are very effective.[patient.info]

Etiology

  • Some cases have been related to medications and intravenous immune globulin. [6] Id reaction has also been noted with BCG therapy. [7] Etiology The etiology of id reactions includes the following: Immunization reactions Papulonecrotic tuberculid [13][emedicine.medscape.com]
  • This article reviews how changes in disposable diaper technology interact with the various etiological factors in DD, thus helping to improve overall diaper area skin health for children around the world.[read.qxmd.com]
  • Inflammation of the skin (dermatitis) in mammals can result from a number of different etiologies.[google.tl]

Epidemiology

  • "Cutaneous id reactions: A comprehensive review of clinical manifestations, epidemiology, ethology and management". Critical Reviews in Microbiology. 38 (3): 191–201. doi : 10.3109/1040841X.2011.645520. ISSN 1549-7828.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • However, id reactions have been reported following BCG vaccination. [14] Epidemiology Frequency The exact prevalence of id reaction is not known. Dermatophytid reactions are reported to occur in 4-5% of patients with dermatophyte infections.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Although the commonest cause of tinea capitis worldwide remains Microsporum canis, starting about 20 years ago in the USA and more recently in the UK, the epidemiology has shifted such that greater than 90% of cases are now caused by Trichophyton tonsurans[ep.bmj.com]
  • Epidemiology [ 1, 2 ] The pattern of infection varies around the world. Microsporum canis is the most common agent in Europe, particularly the countries bordering the Mediterranean.[patient.info]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Dermatophytid Reaction Aka: ID Reaction Pathophysiology Follows Tinea Pedis infection Signs Painful, tense bullae on palms and soles Management Systemic Corticosteroid s Course Occurs at height of dermatophyte infection Id reaction ( C0263236 ) Concepts[66.199.228.237]
  • Pathophysiology While the exact cause of the id reaction is unknown, the following factors are thought to be responsible: (1) abnormal immune recognition of autologous skin antigens, (2) increased stimulation of normal T cells by altered skin constituents[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Id reactions are often described as a type 4 delayed hypersensitivity reaction, though specifics of pathophysiology are incompletelyunderstood.[everydayebm.org]
  • The pathophysiology of disseminated secondary eczema is not well understood. The dissemination is thought to be haematological but it is not known what specific allergen is disseminated.[medicinetoday.com.au]

Prevention

  • Avoidable - 0% Emergent - ED Care Needed - Not Preventable/Avoidable - 4% Primary diagnosis of injury 0% Primary diagnosis of mental health problems 0% Primary diagnosis of substance abuse 0% Primary diagnosis of Alcohol 0% Unclassified 0% Also called[medicbind.com]
  • An in-depth report on the causes diagnosis treatment and prevention of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).[trsovia.eu]
  • Patients should be instructed about proper foot hygiene, which is important to prevent recurrent infections. FREE Publisher Full Text New Search Next[unboundmedicine.com]

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