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Baritosis

Baritosis is used to describe the accumulation of barium in the lungs in the setting of occupational exposure. Although barium is a very toxic mineral when introduced to the body via the gastrointestinal system, patients experience minimal or no symptoms when inhalation of this particle occurs. Cessation of exposure results in rapid resolution of clinical and radiographic findings.


Presentation

Occupational exposure to barium and its numerous forms (most important being barium sulfate) through inhalation was described throughout the 20th century as an asymptomatic form of a nonfibrotic and uncommon type of pneumoconiosis. [1] [2] Manufacturing of lithopone, a white pigment composed primarily of barium sulfate, as well as arc welding and manufacture of paints, paper, glass, rubber, electronic components (in the form of barium titanate) can be the source of this mineral [2] [3]. Consequently, workers (predominantly males) involved in these industries may inhale significant amounts of barium, but very few reports have addressed symptomatic patients in whom a mild cough was reported as the only complaint [2] [3]. In fact, abnormal clinical findings accompanied by an inability to work and frequent leave of absence, as well as impaired lung function, is never reported if baritosis alone is identified. For this reason, it is classified into the group of "benign pneumoconiosis" [3]. Moreover, even short cessation of exposure to barium dust can result in complete resolution of radiographic findings, which are often the only evidence of this condition [3]. However, baritosis may concomitantly develop with other more dangerous types of occupational lung disease, such as asbestosis, silicosis, berylliosis, and coal worker pneumoconiosis. In such disorders, progressive decline in respiratory function accompanied by a cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea is frequently noted, especially if the diagnosis is made after years or decades of exposure [1]. The chronic exposure to barium can lead to the presentation of symptoms like a dry cough, cough with expectoration, wheezing, shortness of breath, sniffing and nasal irritation.

Asymptomatic
  • Cough Wheezing Nasal irritationIn some cases, it is asymptomatic. The barium particles can be seen as opaque shadows on the chest X-rays of people with baritosis.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Symptoms and Signs Asymptomatic Cough Wheezing Nose irritation Asymptomatic Cough Wheezing Nose irritation Cases In a small factory where barytes was crushed, milled and graded nine cases of baritosis happened.[dianamossop.com]
  • Occupational exposure to barium and its numerous forms (most important being barium sulfate) through inhalation was described throughout the 20th century as an asymptomatic form of a nonfibrotic and uncommon type of pneumoconiosis.[symptoma.com]
  • Asymptomatic- The short-term exposure often causes minimum symptoms for few days and later patient is asymptomatic, though Chest X-Ray may show radiopaque shadows of barium dust.[epainassist.com]
Vietnamese
  • Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Vietnamese[translation.sensagent.com]
Amyloidosis
  • Carroll ‏ لا تتوفر معاينة - 2011 عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة acute aetiology amyloid amyloidosis antibodies antigen asbestos asbestos fibre asbestosis aspergilloma Aspergillus associated berylliosis beryllium biopsy bone lesions bronchi bronchial carcinoma[books.google.com]
Turkish
  • Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish[translation.sensagent.com]
Italian
  • Arabic Bulgarian Chinese Croatian Czech Danish Dutch English Estonian Finnish French German Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malagasy Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Romanian Russian Serbian[translation.sensagent.com]
Cough
  • The chronic exposure to barium can lead to the presentation of symptoms like a dry cough, cough with expectoration, wheezing, shortness of breath, sniffing and nasal irritation.[symptoma.com]
  • Cough Wheezing Nasal irritationIn some cases, it is asymptomatic. The barium particles can be seen as opaque shadows on the chest X-rays of people with baritosis.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Expectorant The persistent cough should be treated with expectorant. Expectorant helps to soften mucosa and helps to cough out the sputum and barium particles. Cough Suppressants Irritation of throat and dry cough is treated with cough suppressants.[epainassist.com]
  • Symptoms and Signs Asymptomatic Cough Wheezing Nose irritation Asymptomatic Cough Wheezing Nose irritation Cases In a small factory where barytes was crushed, milled and graded nine cases of baritosis happened.[dianamossop.com]
Hemoptysis
  • In such disorders, progressive decline in respiratory function accompanied by a cough, hemoptysis, and dyspnea is frequently noted, especially if the diagnosis is made after years or decades of exposure.[symptoma.com]
  • Chapters: Air trapping, Allergy, Anaphylaxis, Anginal equivalent, Atelectasis, Baritosis, Central nervous system depression, Chemical pneumonitis, CO retention, Diffuse panbronchiolitis, Dry drowning, Extrapulmonary restriction, Hamman's syndrome, Hemoptysis[alibris.com]
Nasal Irritation
  • The chronic exposure to barium can lead to the presentation of symptoms like a dry cough, cough with expectoration, wheezing, shortness of breath, sniffing and nasal irritation.[symptoma.com]
  • Frequent Sniffing and Nasal Irritation- In few cases barium deposits in nasal mucosa causes irritation of nasal mucosal membrane. The barium deposits in nasal mucosa causes nasal irritation. Patient often complaints of sneezing and nasal itching.[epainassist.com]
Pleural Effusion
  • effusion pneumoconiosis polyarteritis nodosa present prognosis progressive massive fibrosis protein pulmonary eosinophilia pulmonary fibrosis pulmonary sarcoidosis radiographic abnormalities radiographic appearances radiological renal respiratory tract[books.google.com]
Persistent Cough
  • Expectorant The persistent cough should be treated with expectorant. Expectorant helps to soften mucosa and helps to cough out the sputum and barium particles. Cough Suppressants Irritation of throat and dry cough is treated with cough suppressants.[epainassist.com]
Suggestibility
  • Computed tomography (CT), however, is considered as a superior method for diagnosing occupational lung diseases, and extremely dense opacities on high-resolution CT in the basal segments of lower lobes are most important findings that suggest baritosis[symptoma.com]

Workup

Because signs and symptoms of baritosis are virtually non-existent, the diagnosis can often be made only after the use of radiographic findings supported by patient history that will confirm exposure to barium. Plain radiography is a useful initial method that can detect fine nodular lesions and small ring-shaped shadows that point to deposition of dust in the alveoli and bronchioles [2]. Computed tomography (CT), however, is considered as a superior method for diagnosing occupational lung diseases, and extremely dense opacities on high-resolution CT in the basal segments of lower lobes are most important findings that suggest baritosis [4]. A distinction from other types of pneumoconiosis can be made based on the absence of fibrosis, which is typical for asbestosis, silicosis and other more severe forms [2] [3].

X-Ray Abnormal
  • After exposure to barium dust ceases, the X-ray abnormalities gradually resolve. "Baritosis". Medcyclopaedia. GE.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • After exposure to barium dust ceases, the X-ray abnormalities gradually resolve. References Doig AT. Baritosis: a benign pneumoconiosis. Thorax. 1976 Feb;31(1):30-9. PMID 1257935 Categories: Radiology Barium[chemeurope.com]
  • After exposure to barium dust ceases, the X-ray abnormalities gradually resolve. Prognosis - Baritosis Not supplied.[checkorphan.org]
  • After exposure to barium dust ceases, the X-ray abnormalities gradually resolve. References Doig AT. Baritosis: a benign pneumoconiosis. Thorax. 1976 Feb;31(1):30-9.[wikidoc.org]
  • Other Pneumoconiosis: More than 40 inhaled minerals cause lung lesions and x-ray abnormalities.[histopathology-india.net]
Atelectasis
  • Books Respiratory Diseases: Air Trapping, Allergy, Anaphylaxis, Anginal Equivalent, Atelectasis, Baritosis, Central Nervous System Depression, Chemical Pneumonitis, Co Retention, Diffuse Panbronchiolitis, Dry Drowning Please note that the content of this[alibris.com]
Hypercapnia
  • Baritosis, Central nervous system depression, Chemical pneumonitis, CO retention, Diffuse panbronchiolitis, Dry drowning, Extrapulmonary restriction, Hamman's syndrome, Hemoptysis, Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, Human parainfluenza viruses, Hypercapnia[alibris.com]
Pleural Effusion
  • effusion pneumoconiosis polyarteritis nodosa present prognosis progressive massive fibrosis protein pulmonary eosinophilia pulmonary fibrosis pulmonary sarcoidosis radiographic abnormalities radiographic appearances radiological renal respiratory tract[books.google.com]

Treatment

  • Alternative treatments for better health and a healthy lifestyle are now available. Alternative medicine, therapies and treatment options are providing some excellent results for many diseases.[alternativetreatmentsfor.com]
  • The condition generally appears 1 to 2 years after exposure, does not affect the function of the lung, and appears to go away without treatment after exposure stops. [2] Last updated: 11/14/2016[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • The condition generally appears 1 to 2 years after exposure, does not affect the function of the lung, and appears to go away without treatment after exposure stops.[checkorphan.org]
  • Baritosis Patient Handouts on Baritosis Directions to Hospitals Treating Baritosis Risk calculators and risk factors for Baritosis Healthcare Provider Resources Symptoms of Baritosis Causes & Risk Factors for Baritosis Diagnostic studies for Baritosis Treatment[wikidoc.org]
  • […] radiographic abnormalities radiographic appearances radiological renal respiratory tract result rheumatoid disease rheumatoid factors sarcoid tubercles Scadding sclerosis seen serum shadowing silicosis simple pneumoconiosis sputum symptoms syndrome tissue treatment[books.google.com]

Prognosis

  • Prognosis - Baritosis Not supplied.[checkorphan.org]
  • […] lung fields lupus pernio lymph nodes lymphocytes macrophages mesothelioma mottling nerve nodular nodules occasionally occur onset opacities pathogenesis Pathology patients peripheral plaques pleural effusion pneumoconiosis polyarteritis nodosa present prognosis[books.google.com]

Etiology

  • Two major issues complicate the etiology of pneumoconioses: 1) First is the variety of dusts to which the sufferer may have been exposed. Often workers exposed to inorganic dusts work in several occupations.[histopathology-india.net]

References

Article

  1. Chong S, Lee KS, Chung MJ, Han J, Kwon OJ, Kim TS. Pneumoconiosis: comparison of imaging and pathologic findings. Radiographics. 2006;26(1):59-77.
  2. Seaton A, Ruckley VA, Addison J, Brown WR. Silicosis in barium miners. Thorax. 1986;41(8):591-595.
  3. Doig AT. Baritosis: a benign pneumoconiosis. Thorax. 1976;31(1):30-39.
  4. Ceylan N, Bayraktaroglu S, Savaş R, Alper H. CT findings of high-attenuation pulmonary abnormalities. Insights Imaging. 2010;1(4):287-292.

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Last updated: 2019-07-11 22:39