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Biliary Peritonitis


Presentation

  • RESULTS: A total of 6 patients were included in present series commonest presenting symptom was progressive abdominal distension without signs of overt peritonitis followed by progressive jaundice, fever and abdominal pain.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Anomalous pancreaticobiliary union (APBU) has varied presentations.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We present the postmortem findings and a review of the literature.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Such an unusual presentation of chronic calcific pancreatitis is herein reported.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The clinical presentation is highly variable depending on the extent of the ischemic territory. We report a case of biliary peritonitis related to an acute thrombosis of the celiac trunk.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Fever
  • In addition, abdominal pain, fever and WBC count are also predictive of severity of BP.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Gallbladder perforation as a complication of typhoid fever. PMID: 13377918. 1956. Veronesi, G. Gallbladder perforation in typhoid fever. PMID:13193785. 1954. Klein, K. Gall bladder perforation complicating typhoid fever in a child.[acmicrob.com]
  • RESULTS: A total of 6 patients were included in present series commonest presenting symptom was progressive abdominal distension without signs of overt peritonitis followed by progressive jaundice, fever and abdominal pain.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Rapidly Progressive Glomerulonephritis
  • With a diagnosis of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis due to immune complex, the patient received steroid treatment for nephritis, diuretics, and carperitide for heart failure.[surgicalcasereports.springeropen.com]
Plethora
  • […] appropriately selecting and interpreting laboratory tests, Small Animal Clinical Diagnosis by Laboratory Methods, 5th Edition helps you utilize your in-house lab or your specialty reference lab to efficiently make accurate diagnoses without running a plethora[books.google.com]
Acute Abdomen
  • We describe a case of 65-year old previously healthy man, who present with signs of acute abdomen, due to biliary peritonitis as a complication of acute acalculouscholecystitis caused by Salmonella paratyphi B.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Spontaneous rupture of intrahepatic biliary ducts is a rare cause of acute abdomen due to biliary peritonitis. We report a 92-year-old woman with 48-h history of upper abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting and peritoneal signs.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Most patients present with an acute abdomen and are operated upon urgently without diagnostic iter. A recent experience with such a case prompted a thorough review of 27 similar cases previously reported.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • BACKGROUND: Spontaneous biliary peritonitis is a rare cause of acute abdomen.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract Background : Spontaneous biliary peritonitis is a rare cause of acute abdomen.[ajol.info]
Abdominal Distension
  • RESULTS: A total of 6 patients were included in present series commonest presenting symptom was progressive abdominal distension without signs of overt peritonitis followed by progressive jaundice, fever and abdominal pain.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Results : A total of 6 patients were included in present series commonest presenting symptom was progressive abdominal distension without signs of overt peritonitis followed by progressive jaundice, fever and abdominal pain.[ajol.info]
  • Results: A total of 6 patients were included in present series commonest presenting symptom was progressive abdominal distension without signs of overt peritonitis followed by progressive jaundice, fever and abdominal pain.[afrjpaedsurg.org]
  • Abdominal examination revealed mild abdominal distension, general abdominal guarding and rigidity in the right upper quadrant. There were no palpable masses or liver enlargement. The hernial sites were free.[panafrican-med-journal.com]
  • The clinical examination showed an abdominal distension and diffuse pain. FAST echography revealed a moderate peritoneal effusion.[wjes.biomedcentral.com]
Abdominal Rigidity
  • He developed fever, jaundice, and abdominal rigidity.[surgicalcasereports.springeropen.com]
  • Other symptoms [ edit ] Diffuse abdominal rigidity (" abdominal guarding ") is often present, especially in generalized peritonitis Fever Sinus tachycardia Development of ileus paralyticus (i.e., intestinal paralysis), which also causes nausea, vomiting[en.wikipedia.org]
Severe Abdominal Pain
  • If you have severe abdominal pain or an abdominal injury, such as a knife wound, take one of the following actions: see your doctor go to an emergency room call 911 or your local emergency services The outlook for peritonitis depends on the cause of your[healthline.com]
  • Symptoms include sudden, severe abdominal pain. A rupture, also known as a perforation, often causes infection. One example is the rupture of the appendix during a case of appendicitis.[medicalnewstoday.com]
Abdominal Guarding
  • Abdominal examination revealed mild abdominal distension, general abdominal guarding and rigidity in the right upper quadrant. There were no palpable masses or liver enlargement. The hernial sites were free.[panafrican-med-journal.com]
  • Other symptoms [ edit ] Diffuse abdominal rigidity (" abdominal guarding ") is often present, especially in generalized peritonitis Fever Sinus tachycardia Development of ileus paralyticus (i.e., intestinal paralysis), which also causes nausea, vomiting[en.wikipedia.org]
Hypotension
  • They may be hypotensive due to dehydration and show signs of septic shock. Bowel sounds may be absent.[patient.info]
Eruptions
  • With a diagnosis of drug eruption, the suspected drugs were discontinued, but the skin eruption rapidly expanded with vesicles and fell into the status of toxic epidermal necrolysis.[surgicalcasereports.springeropen.com]

Workup

  • Bile Duct Strictures: Differential Diagnoses & Workup; 2009; 3;7 [cited 2010 Nov 27]. Available from 186850-overview. 21 Kim JY, Kim KW, Ahn C, Hwang S, Lee Y, Shin YM, Lee MG.[ghrnet.org]
Amylase Increased
  • Diagnosis and Tests Laboratory findings: Ascitic fluid – turbid, bloody, may contain fat globules; increased WBC ; Gram's stain and aerobic and anaerobic cultures show multiple organisms; increased amylase ; increased mononuclear cells and decreased glucose[diagnose-me.com]
Salmonella Typhi
  • AAC occurs in 2% of Salmonella typhi infections. Nontyphoidal salmonella (NTS) are rarely isolated from cases of acute cholecystitis [ 2 ].[panafrican-med-journal.com]
  • The present case report is of typhoid perforation of the gall bladder in a young female, successfully treated by cholecystectomy and appropriate antimicrobial therapy. Introduction Typhoid fever, caused by Salmonella Typhi (S.[acmicrob.com]
Lymphocytic Infiltrate
  • Figure 2: H & E Microphotograph showing ulceration of epithelium & mucosa with lymphocytic infiltration and congested blood vessels.[acmicrob.com]

Treatment

  • The prompt surgical treatment on diagnosis has good prognosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • BACKGROUND: Nonoperative management is now regarded as the best alternative for the treatment of patients with complex blunt liver injuries.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • RESULTS: Serious illness and worse outcome were associated with: age 60 years (P 0.034), long time between onset of symptoms and treatment (P 0.025), fever 38 C (P 0.009), WBC count 17,000 cell/mm³ (P 0.043), diffuse abdominal pain (P 0.034), and infected[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • RESULTS: Serious illness and worse outcome were associated with: age 60 years (P 0.034), long time between onset of symptoms and treatment (P 0.025), fever 38 C (P 0.009), WBC count 17.000 cell/mm³ (P 0.043), diffuse abdominal pain (P 0.034), and infected[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • RESULTS: Serious illness and worse outcome were associated with: age 60 years (P 0.034), long time between onset of symptoms and treatment (P 0.025), fever 38 C (P 0.009), WBC count 17.000 cell/mm3 (P 0.043), diffuse abdominal pain (P 0.034), and infected[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • The prompt surgical treatment on diagnosis has good prognosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • What is the prognosis for a person with peritonitis? The prognosis for individuals who develop peritonitis depends on both the underlying cause and how rapidly the disease is treated. The prognosis can range from good to poor.[medicinenet.com]
  • Perforated viscera in typhoid fever: A better prognosis for children. Journal of Pediatric Surgery 1975; 8: 531-532.[acmicrob.com]
  • Prognosis Abscess The prognosis has improved considerably with the advent of drainage under CT scanning. Deaths are generally due to the underlying disease process or unsuspected foci of infection.[patient.info]
  • ., cefotaxime, ceftriaxone Discontinue nonselective β-blockers Prognosis, Prevention, Complications Prognosis 90% of cases resolve with proper antibiotic treatment Prevention antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with risk factors for SBP agent: trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole[medbullets.com]

Etiology

  • Three forms of biliary peritonitis without demonstrable perforation are differentiated due to etiology as far as known.[pesquisa.bvsalud.org]
  • Bile duct injuries can be split into five groups according to the mechanism of etiology or to the severity of the lesion.[websurg.com]
  • Biliary peritonitis and biliary leaks The therapy of complications like these is based upon their etiology.[hpb.cz]
  • Pathogenesis Etiology Extrahepatic disease: Severe red cell destruction must be considered in the jaundiced patient. Cholelithiasis. Neoplasia obstructing the bile duct: Within the gall bladder. Within the biliary tree. At the duodenal papilla.[vetstream.com]
  • The etiology is uncertain, but possible causes include decreased motilin levels, removal of the duodenal pacemaker, and disruption of gastroduodenal neural connections.[ghrnet.org]

Epidemiology

  • ., infection, or malignancy may be due to bacterial translocation from the intestine into the ascitic fluid microbiology commonly Escherichia coli, Klebsiella, Streptococcus Epidemiology most commonly occurs in patients with advanced cirrhosis can result[medbullets.com]
  • Epidemiology The incidence depends on the cause. In a hospital setting the prevalence of SBP is around 10%. [ 3 ] Three studies of patients with perforated appendicitis found an incidence of postoperative abscess formation of 20%.[patient.info]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • The pathophysiology of GBP may be caused by an inflammatory reaction and weakness of its wall in the course of the disease due to multiplication of S. Typhi in high numbers in the bile [ 3 ]. The intense inflammation caused by the highly virulent S.[acmicrob.com]
  • Pathophysiology Jaundice represents an accumulation of bilirubin within the blood and subsequently deposition within various body tissues - mucous membranes and skin are most obviously involved.[vetstream.com]
  • […] community acquired or nosocomial infections - patients treated with antibiotics repeatedly or for a long time immediately before the surgery with modified microbial flora), type of patient especially with regard to severe concurrent diseases and ensuing pathophysiological[hpb.cz]

Prevention

  • Features of the case that may have contributed to this complication are described and methods of preventing such an outcome discussed.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • On the contrary, the indications for such intervention are always widening, as its risks become always smaller and the requirements for prevention higher.[books.google.com]
  • Treatment and prevention of this complication are essential in the management of gallstone diseases.[websurg.com]
  • Prevention Peritonitis is not always preventable, and it can happen without warning. However, some cases can be preventable. Good clinical hygiene is vital.[medicalnewstoday.com]
  • Can peritonitis be prevented? Prevention or reduction in the chance of developing peritonitis can be done by preventing underlying causes (for example, trauma, ulcers, alcoholic cirrhosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease).[medicinenet.com]

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