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Bladder Fistula

Fistula Vesical


Presentation

  • He presented 7 months after initiation of ART, which suggests that this presentation was an IRIS phenomenon. IRIS in HIV-infected patients initiating ART results from restored immunity to specific infectious or non-infectious antigens.[sajs.redbricklibrary.com]
  • We present a patient with electrical burns which resulted in loss of the right upper arm and a urinary bladder fistula. A jump flap was used to cover the repaired bladder, and also to cover the stump of the amputated right arm.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In this review chapter, we cover the etiology, clinical presentation, and various surgical approaches to repairing vesicovaginal and enterovesical fistulas.[ucdavis.pure.elsevier.com]
  • Our aim is to present a case of enterovesical fistula following myomectomy. 2.[scirp.org]
  • Most patients in the present series were male.[urotoday.com]
Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection
  • Presenting features include fecaluria, pneumaturia and recurrent urinary tract infection [5] [6] [7] .[scirp.org]
  • urinary tract infections, or passage of urine rectally 4.[radiopaedia.org]
  • urinary tract infections, or passage of urine rectally 4 .[radiopaedia.org]
  • The symptoms of the appendicovesical fistula resemble those of other enterovesical fistulae and include dysuria, recurrent urinary tract infection, pneumaturia, and fecaluria. Confirmation of the appendicular origin of such fistulae is difficult.[journals.lww.com]
  • Aggarwal, et al. (2011). “26-year-old man with recurrent urinary tract infections.” Mayo Clin Proc 86(6): 557-560. PubMed ; CrossRef Sou, S., T. Yao, et al. (1999).[urotoday.com]
Pseudotumor
  • “Inflammatory pseudotumor of the urinary bladder. A clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and flow cytometric study of 13 cases.” Am J Surg Pathol 17(3): 264-274. PubMed ; CrossRef Benchekroun, A., H. A. el Alj, et al. (2003).[urotoday.com]
Rigor
  • Those distinctions mean our doctors passed optional, rigorous exams and completed additional years of subspecialty training. Providers from across the tristate area look to our team members for their expertise and advice. Meet our team.[muschealth.org]
Dyspnea
  • He denied fever, chills, weight change, cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hematochezia, melena, dysuria, hematuria, urinary urgency, numbness, and tingling. History.[consultant360.com]
Tingling
  • He denied fever, chills, weight change, cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hematochezia, melena, dysuria, hematuria, urinary urgency, numbness, and tingling. History.[consultant360.com]
Encephalopathy
  • Haug Browse recently published Learning/CME Learning/CME View all learning/CME CME Case 3-2019: A 70-Year-Old Woman with Fever, Headache, and Progressive Encephalopathy Caplacizumab Treatment for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Randomized[nejm.org]
Urinary Incontinence
  • Urinary incontinence is a primary symptom of a bladder fistula, because the fistula's opening can leave you unable to control the flow of urine from the bladder.[sharecare.com]
  • A vesicovaginal fistula can lead to urinary incontinence and a rectovaginal fistula can lead to fecal incontinence.[search.com]
  • Female Urinary Incontinence Male Urinary Incontinence Pelvic Organ Prolapse Urinary Tract Infection About our Incontinence Center Sexual Function & Infertility Epididymitis / Orchitis Erectile Dysfunction -Nonsurgical Management Erectile Dysfunction -[mciverclinic.com]
  • A vesicovaginal fistula can lead to urinary incontinence, and a rectovaginal fistula can lead to fecal incontinence.[urogyn.coloradowomenshealth.com]
Uremia
  • Due to its associated complications, including diarrhea, nephritis due to reflux of urine into the ureters, and uremia due to reabsorption of urea in the colon, it has become the least-performed procedure.[consultant360.com]
Microscopic Hematuria
  • When blood can only be seen with a microscope, it’s called microscopic hematuria. Diarrhea and abdominal pain are also common symptoms. More than half of colovesical fistula cases are the result of diverticular disease.[healthline.com]

Workup

  • The primary aim of a diagnostic workup is not to observe the fistular tract itself but to find the etiology of the disease so that an appropriate therapy can be initiated.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Discussion The diagnosis of an enterovesical fistula poses a significant challenge as there is no consensus on any clear gold standard for EVf workup.[omicsonline.org]
Pyuria
  • Pyuria is very common; chronic pyuria with positive urine cultures in young adults should suggest an enterovesical fistula [6,13,17] . Hematuria is less common [12,18,19] .[urotoday.com]
Hyponatremia
  • Patients may also exhibit metabolic disturbances secondary to diarrhea, including hyponatremia, hypochloremia, hyperkalemia, and metabolic acidosis. Outcome of the case.[consultant360.com]

Treatment

  • Following the diagnosis of a fistula, the medical professional will decide the best plan of treatment based on its location, size, and condition. One treatment path may simply be controlling symptoms with a catheter.[nafc.org]
  • Despite different techniques have been proposed as yet there is still no standard treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The second phase of treatment will vary from patient to patient depending on the precise nature of the fistula.[cedars-sinai.edu]
  • However, only a minority of fistulae subsides under this treatment [26] . Thus, surgery remains the treatment of choice [31] .[urotoday.com]

Prognosis

  • Treatment and prognosis Surgical resection of the fistula and abnormal segment of bowel is usually required for cure, although in the setting of malignancy this suggests advanced disease (T4) making surgery complex.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Prognosis The location and severity of the fistula play a major role in determining treatment. A fistula is a sign of serious inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and without proper care, can lead to serious complications.[ibdcrohns.about.com]
  • Outlook (Prognosis) This surgery will very often repair the prolapse and the symptoms will go away. This improvement will often last for years. References Kirby AC, Lentz GM.[mountsinai.org]

Etiology

  • In this review chapter, we cover the etiology, clinical presentation, and various surgical approaches to repairing vesicovaginal and enterovesical fistulas.[ucdavis.pure.elsevier.com]
  • English : BL blood CF cerebrospinal fluid CI chemically induced CL classification CO complications CN congenital DI diagnosis DG diagnostic imaging DH diet therapy DT drug therapy EC economics EM embryology EN enzymology EP epidemiology EH ethnology ET etiology[decs.bvs.br]
  • Conclusions Entero-vesical fistula is an uncommon complication of both malignant and benign processes and even a rare etiology must be considered, like in our case.[omicsonline.org]
  • The type of surgery required to treat a colovesical fistula depends on the etiology (cause), severity, and location of the fistula. Typically, for these cases, doctors use a kind of surgery called a sigmoid colectomy.[healthline.com]
  • Etiology: Ureterocolic fistula is the most common type of ureteroenteric fistula. Etiologies include colorectal malignancy, post pelvic surgery, radiation therapy and spontaneous fistulas.[ijcasereportsandimages.com]

Epidemiology

  • 2006 Allowable Qualifiers English : BL blood CF cerebrospinal fluid CI chemically induced CL classification CO complications CN congenital DI diagnosis DG diagnostic imaging DH diet therapy DT drug therapy EC economics EM embryology EN enzymology EP epidemiology[decs.bvs.br]
  • Epidemiology and pathogenesis of diverticular disease. J Gastrointest Surg. 2008; 12 :1309–1311. [ PubMed ] 5. Song JH, Huh JG, Kim YS, Lee JH, Jang WC, Ok KS, et al.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Epidemiology Colovesical fistulae are the most common type of fistulous communication between the bowel and the urinary bladder. heT incidence in patients with diverticular disease approximately 2%.[knowledge.statpearls.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Pathophysiology An enterovesical fistula usually refers to a predisposing pathophysiologic process. Therefore, the pathophysiology depends on the predisposing cause or disease.[knowledge.statpearls.com]
  • Sleisenger & Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 28. Lentz GM, Krane M. Anal incontinence: diagnosis and management.[nlm.nih.gov]
  • Such conditions may include: chronic steroid use smoking poorly controlled diabetes mellitus infection malignancy return to top Pathophysiology Fistulas often occur following injury to the vaginal tissue.[sharinginhealth.ca]

Prevention

  • For malformations that involve the mixing of urine and feces, treatment will first focus on diverting the feces away from the urethra to prevent infection and other complications.[cedars-sinai.edu]
  • A high index of suspicion is required to prevent a delay in the diagnosis of this disease condition. As seen in this case report, diagnosis and surgical repair of enterovesical fistula was done three years after myomectomy.[scirp.org]
  • […] diet therapy DT drug therapy EC economics EM embryology EN enzymology EP epidemiology EH ethnology ET etiology GE genetics HI history IM immunology ME metabolism MI microbiology MO mortality NU nursing PS parasitology PA pathology PP physiopathology PC prevention[decs.bvs.br]
  • To prevent the cross-contamination that occurs with any fistula and to restore normal function to your bladder, the urogynecologists at Women’s Center for Pelvic Wellness repair your fistula surgically by placing healthy tissue over the opening.[search.com]
  • Not only do they provide expert preventative care, they are international leaders in repairing problems that develop after complex surgeries. There is no aspect of urologic care our program can’t provide. MUSC Health is proud to have earned U.S.[muschealth.org]

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