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Bordetella Parapertussis

Bordetella Parapertussis Bacterium


Presentation

  • CONCLUSION: The prevalence of B. pertussis in children presenting to the ED with bronchiolitis was 2%. Copyright 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The medical records of Mayo Clinic patients who tested positive in 2014 were reviewed for demographic information, presenting symptoms, disease course, and vaccination history.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • IS1001 is present in a subset of B. bronchiseptica strains that were derived mainly from pigs and rabbits, suggesting that these strains had a common ancestry.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We review the literature and describe the clinical presentation and treatment of 2 children with B. parapertussis bacteremia, as well as the techniques used to isolate the organism.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Presently, the intracellular fate of these bacteria in human tracheal epithelial cells was compared by use of transmission electron microscopy. The three species, even when cytotoxic, were taken-up by epithelial cells.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Fever
  • A38.0 Scarlet fever with otitis media A38.1 Scarlet fever with myocarditis A38.8 Scarlet fever with other complications Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.[icd10data.com]
  • A38.0 Scarlet fever with otitis media A38.1 Scarlet fever with myocarditis Reimbursement claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015 require the use of ICD-10-CM codes.[icd10data.com]
  • Fever abated within 24 hours of instituting levofloxacin, and he was weaned off oxygen within 72 hours.[journals.lww.com]
  • Though efficacious and immunogenic, tolerability was limited by vaccine reactions, including local reactions, fever, and febrile seizures.[medpagetoday.com]
  • All whole cell vaccines are reactogenic, causing fever and local reactions in many vaccinees. In the past, these vaccines were thought to cause infant deaths and brain damage.[doi.org]
Italian
  • In the Italian trial, a comparison of clinical characteristics between B. pertussis and B. parapertussis infections showed lower frequencies and shorter duration of typical symptoms of whooping cough such as paroxysmal coughing, whooping, and vomiting[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Assuming that pertussis vaccines are not efficacious in preventing B. parapertussis infections, as suggested also by this study, the incidence of B. parapertussis infection in Italian children 36 months of age or younger is 2.1 per 1,000 person-years.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Fatigue
  • His symptoms had been slowly progressing over the preceding 6 months, with the additional development of fatigue and nonproductive cough 2–3 months before presentation, both of which had worsened in the past 2 weeks.[journals.lww.com]
Pertussis
  • Abstract Bordetella pertussis and B. parapertussis are the etiological agents of pertussis, yet the former has a higher incidence and is the cause of a more severe disease, in part due to pertussis toxin.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] infection caused by Bordetella pertussis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of positive cultures for B pertussis or B parapertussis and/or positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results and frequency of symptoms in those with pertussis and parapertussis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • All samples were tested for B. pertussis. B. parapertussis testing could not be completed on 23 samples. No cases (0/204; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0-1.8%) tested positive for B. pertussis or B. parapertussis (0/181; 95% CI 0-2%).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Cough
  • Frequencies of typical symptoms of whooping cough, such as paroxysmal coughing, whooping and vomiting, were almost identical in the two groups. Nocturnal coughing and contact anamnesis were noted more often in the Bordetella pertussis group.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In the Italian trial, a comparison of clinical characteristics between B. pertussis and B. parapertussis infections showed lower frequencies and shorter duration of typical symptoms of whooping cough such as paroxysmal coughing, whooping, and vomiting[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Data regarding acute cough illnesses and receipt of azithromycin prophylaxis among parapertussis patient household members (HHMs) were also collected.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • At the first sampling, ten children were found to have a cough and 21 were asymptomatic. Of the latter, 12 remained asymptomatic and eight developed cough within 11 to 53 days (mean /- standard deviation, 31 /- 12 days) after sampling.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Thus, the O antigen of B. parapertussis confers asymmetrical cross-immunity between the causative agents of whooping cough.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Persistent Cough
  • Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a respiratory infection that causes a persistent cough in all age groups from the newborn to the elderly.[ibl-international.com]
  • Pertussis can also present as a non-specific persistent cough Vomiting often follows a coughing spasm. Infants may develop apnoea and/or cyanosis with coughing spasms. Close contact with a case of Pertussis may raise suspicion.[rch.org.au]
  • cough, especially in the absence of fever, sore throat, hoarseness, tachypnea, or wheeze Posttussive emesis in setting of acute viral illness symptoms Laboratory Testing Refer to Key Points Differential Diagnosis Acute ( Viral upper respiratory infection[arupconsult.com]
Sleep Disturbance
  • Forty percent reported posttussive vomiting, 40% coryza, 32% apnea/sleep disturbance, and 12% sore throat. All were current with pertussis vaccination.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • Prompt treatment might shorten illness duration, and prompt HHM prophylaxis might prevent secondary illnesses.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We review the literature and describe the clinical presentation and treatment of 2 children with B. parapertussis bacteremia, as well as the techniques used to isolate the organism.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • These results suggest a possible role for the fluoroquinolones in the treatment of pertussis, at least in adult patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract A repeated DNA sequence in the genome of Bordetella parapertussis was identified by means of heteroduplex formation and S1 nuclease treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Following treatment of the monolayers with gentamicin, numbers of viable B. parapertussis recovered were comparable to those of invasive Salmonella and Shigella isolates.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Etiology

  • The results of this prospective study suggest that Bordetella parapertussis is a more common etiologic agent of mild respiratory tract infection among vaccinated school-aged children than is generally recognised.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract Bordetella pertussis and B. parapertussis are the etiological agents of pertussis, yet the former has a higher incidence and is the cause of a more severe disease, in part due to pertussis toxin.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] diagnostic test for the detection of Bordetella pertussis or Bordetella parapertussis Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test Bordetella pertussis is the highly contagious etiological[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
  • Birkebaek NH: Bordetella pertussis in the etiology of chronic cough in adults.Diagnostic methods and clinic. Dan Med Bull 2001; 48:77–80. Wendelboe and Van Rie: Diagnosis of pertussis: a his- torical review and recent developments.[ijm.tums.ac.ir]

Epidemiology

  • Specific diagnostic tools were applied for the first time in a Tunisian prospective study in order to get a first estimation of the prevalence of Bordetella pertussis/parapertussis infections and to evaluate their use to determine the epidemiologic characteristics[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract The epidemiology of whooping cough in a vaccinated population was studied during an outbreak of paroxysmal cough in an elementary school with 258 pupils in Turku, Finland.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Epidemiology and Pathogenesis Epidemiology Before the introduction of the vaccine (and currently in nonimmunized populations), pertussis (whooping cough) periodically became an epidemic disease that cycled approximately every 2 to 5 years.[clinicalgate.com]
  • Overview of pertussis: focus on epidemiology, sources of infection, and long term protection after infant vaccination. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal 2005 ; 24 : S104 – S108. 3. He, QS, et al.[cambridge.org]
  • Epidemiology of pertussis. Pediatr Infect Dis J 2006;25:361–2. [3]. Mattoo S, Cherry J. Molecular pathogenesis, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations of respiratory infections due to Bordetella pertussis and other Bordetella subspecies.[journals.lww.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Useful For Suggests clinical disorders or settings where the test may be helpful Preferred diagnostic test for the detection of Bordetella pertussis or Bordetella parapertussis Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical[mayomedicallaboratories.com]

Prevention

  • Prompt treatment might shorten illness duration, and prompt HHM prophylaxis might prevent secondary illnesses.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Taken together, our data suggest that in the absence of opsonic antibodies, B. parapertussis survives inside macrophages by preventing phagolysosomal maturation in a lipid raft- and O antigen-dependent manner.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The analysis of the distribution of B. parapertussis cases in children fully immunized with each pertussis vaccine suggested that vaccination is irrelevant in preventing B. parapertussis infection.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • However, immunity induced by B. pertussis infection prevented subsequent B. pertussis infections but did not protect against B. parapertussis infections.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Author information 1 Molecular Prevention and Therapy of Human Diseases, Institut Pasteur, National Centre of Reference of whooping cough and other bordetelloses, Paris, France. nicole.guiso@pasteur.fr Abstract Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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