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Brain Laceration

Laceration of Brain


Presentation

  • When such injuries are present or such injuries result in death, the party found to be negligent or at fault in the accident that caused the injuries may be held legally liable to compensate the victim or their family.[ernstlawgroup.com]
  • Additional chapters emphasize forensic evaluation with discussions on the detection of brain-injury malingering, determination of impairment, methods of neurobehavioral analysis, and the presentation of evidence at trial.[books.google.com]
  • Persons surviving a severe traumatic brain injury often present long-term disabilities, sensitive and motor deficits, cognitive, vegetative or mental disorders.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • A subdural hemorrhage is present above and below the cerebellar tentorium. D, A photograph of specimen from brain cutting demonstrates the left temporal SCWM laceration ( black arrow ). Fig 4. Parenchymal brain lacerations. Case 53.[ajnr.org]
  • This type of lesion is present in 35% of head trauma deaths and is the most common cause of poor neurological outcome.[kobiljak.msu.edu]
Spontaneous Hemorrhage
  • They can cause progressive increase in intracranial pressure and eventually death. brain hemorrhage intracranial hemorrhage affecting the brain usually follows traumatic injury but spontaneous hemorrhage may result from an intrinsic vascular lesion.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
Military Personnel
  • Military personnel in combat zones are also at risk. Symptoms of a TBI may not appear until days or weeks following the injury. A concussion is the mildest type.[icdlist.com]
Fever
  • Fever is treated. If seizures occur, anticonvulsants are given. To measure pressure in the brain, doctors may implant a pressure gauge inside the skull or insert a catheter into one of the internal spaces (ventricles) within the brain.[merckmanuals.com]
Epilepsy
  • […] sinuses or auditory canal l Signs: Racoon’s eyes, Battle’s sign, otorrhea, rhinorrhea l post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) or milder memory difficulties l focal losses (e.g cognitive, personality, motor etc.) l meningitis if head was opened l post-traumatic epilepsy[uni.edu]
Malingering
  • Additional chapters emphasize forensic evaluation with discussions on the detection of brain-injury malingering, determination of impairment, methods of neurobehavioral analysis, and the presentation of evidence at trial.[books.google.com]
Neck Pain
  • It can cause a headache or neck pain, nausea, ringing in the ears, dizziness, and tiredness.[icdlist.com]
Seizure
  • Since then, Wells said, her son has had brain surgery and multiple seizures. The full catalogue of his injuries includes brain damage, lacerations on his liver and blood behind his retinas, according to Wells.[wcpo.com]
  • People with a moderate or severe TBI may have those, plus other symptoms: A headache that gets worse or does not go away Repeated vomiting or nausea Convulsions or seizures Inability to awaken from sleep Slurred speech Weakness or numbness in the arms[icdlist.com]
  • They may also have vomiting, seizures, or impaired balance or coordination. The ability to think, control emotions, move, feel, speak, see, hear, smell, and remember may be impaired.[merckmanuals.com]
  • The latter include: seizures, unilateral or bilateral weakness or paralysis. 3. Intracerebral Bleeding Bleeding is within the cerebrum and often includes sub-cortical structures. It most often occurs because of penetrating head wounds.[csuchico.edu]
Seizure
  • Since then, Wells said, her son has had brain surgery and multiple seizures. The full catalogue of his injuries includes brain damage, lacerations on his liver and blood behind his retinas, according to Wells.[wcpo.com]
  • People with a moderate or severe TBI may have those, plus other symptoms: A headache that gets worse or does not go away Repeated vomiting or nausea Convulsions or seizures Inability to awaken from sleep Slurred speech Weakness or numbness in the arms[icdlist.com]
  • They may also have vomiting, seizures, or impaired balance or coordination. The ability to think, control emotions, move, feel, speak, see, hear, smell, and remember may be impaired.[merckmanuals.com]
  • The latter include: seizures, unilateral or bilateral weakness or paralysis. 3. Intracerebral Bleeding Bleeding is within the cerebrum and often includes sub-cortical structures. It most often occurs because of penetrating head wounds.[csuchico.edu]
Headache
  • It can cause a headache or neck pain, nausea, ringing in the ears, dizziness, and tiredness.[icdlist.com]
  • Symptoms of bleeding in the brain, which may gradually worsen or suddenly appear, include: sudden severe headache seizures nausea or repeated vomiting lethargy weakness in an arm or leg loss of consciousness.[radiologyinfo.org]
  • High-risk patients have focal neurologic findings, asymmetric pupils, multiple traumas, initial GCS of 14 to 15, loss of consciousness, headache, nausea, vomiting, seizure, intoxication, and much more [12].[journalofethics.ama-assn.org]
Slurred Speech
  • People with a moderate or severe TBI may have those, plus other symptoms: A headache that gets worse or does not go away Repeated vomiting or nausea Convulsions or seizures Inability to awaken from sleep Slurred speech Weakness or numbness in the arms[icdlist.com]
  • speech, N/V, HA, changes in LOC, pupil changes, amnesia, decrease strength decline of consciousness, projectile vomiting, impaired speech/groaning, cardiac dysrhythmias, brainstem reflex impairment, abnormal reflexes, wide pulse pressure w/ HTN, irregular[quizlet.com]
  • Slurred speech. Ringing in your ears. Intense headache. Changes in vision or consciousness.[spinalcord.com]
  • speech difficulty with walking weakness in one side or area of the body sweating pale in color seizures or convulsions behavior changes including irritable blood or clear fluid draining from the ears or nose one pupil (dark area in the center of the[beaumont.org]
Convulsions
  • Acute anoxia causes muscle tremor, recumbency, convulsions and death or recovery if the anoxia is relieved soon enough. Chronic anoxia causes lethargy, weakness, blindness and sometimes convulsions.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • People with a moderate or severe TBI may have those, plus other symptoms: A headache that gets worse or does not go away Repeated vomiting or nausea Convulsions or seizures Inability to awaken from sleep Slurred speech Weakness or numbness in the arms[icdlist.com]
  • […] and vomiting loss of short term memory, such as difficulty remembering the events that led right up to and through the traumatic event slurred speech difficulty with walking weakness in one side or area of the body sweating pale in color seizures or convulsions[beaumont.org]
  • […] and vomiting Loss of short term memory, such as difficulty remembering the events that led right up to and through the traumatic event Slurred speech Difficulty with walking Weakness in one side or area of the body Sweating Pale in color Seizures or convulsions[hopkinsmedicine.org]

Workup

Brain Edema
  • This may be done surgically by opening the cranium, or medically by administering hypertonic solutions of slowly metabolized materials, such as mannitol, intravenously. brain edema an important part of a number of acute diseases, e.g. lead poisoning,[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Histopathology, classification and clinical significance of brain edema. J Neurosurg 4: 255–258 PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar 32. Scheinker IM (1945) Vasothrombosis in the central nervous system.[link.springer.com]

Treatment

  • Unfortunately, the dramatic rise in the occurrence of brain injuries over the same time period demands better proficiency in evaluation and treatment.[books.google.com]
  • Serious traumatic brain injuries need emergency treatment. Treatment and outcome depend on how severe the injury is. TBI can cause a wide range of changes affecting thinking, sensation, language, or emotions.[icdlist.com]
  • That changes as there is more bleeding and build up within the skull.Since traumatic brain injuries are serious personal injuries, its important that you get the proper medical treatment.[seriousaccidents.com]
  • Research has shown that prompt, aggressive traumatic brain injury treatment is key to the best long-term outcomes.[beaumont.org]

Prognosis

  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Accurate differentiation of abusive head trauma and accidental head injury in infants and young children is critical and impacts clinical care, patient prognosis, forensic investigations, and medicolegal proceedings.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Persons who suffer a brain laceration typically have a poor prognosis, particularly when there are large amounts of blood visible on a CT scan. Complications associated with the injury are not dependent on the specific location of the laceration.[ernstlawgroup.com]
  • You can help by adding to it. ( November 2018 ) Prognosis [ edit ] A cerebral laceration with large amounts of blood apparent on a CT scan is an indicator of poor prognosis. [2] The progression and course of complications (health effects that result from[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Treatment and Prognosis for Focal Brain Injuries It's possible to heal from focal brain injuries, but your prognosis is dependent on a range of factors, including your overall health, the location and severity of your injury, how promptly you sought medical[spinalcord.com]
  • Prognosis is determined by papillary response, age, medical conditions, motor exam on arrival, and other injuries [15]. Around one-fourth of patients with severe TBI eventually require neurosurgical intervention for intracranial lesions [16].[journalofethics.ama-assn.org]

Etiology

  • For specific brain diseases see under headings relating to etiology and lesion. brain abscess common signs caused by an abscess in the brain are circling, rotation of the head, abnormal reflexes in one eye.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]

Epidemiology

  • It discusses the neuroanatomical and neuroimaging bases of cognitive domains of the brain and includes findings on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of brain injury, as well as acquired psychopathology following injury.[books.google.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • It discusses the neuroanatomical and neuroimaging bases of cognitive domains of the brain and includes findings on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of brain injury, as well as acquired psychopathology following injury.[books.google.com]

Prevention

  • NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Brain injury - discharge Chronic subdural hematoma EEG Extradural hemorrhage Facts about Concussion and Brain Injury (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Head injury - first aid Intracranial[icdlist.com]
  • Prevention of Fetal Lacerations There is ongoing in-depth research in ways to prevent fetal lacerations. Although research continues, a device called CSafe, has proven to an effective way to help prevent fetal lacerations.[birthinjuryguide.org]
  • Prevention With lacerations and any skin wound in general, the best means of prevention is to use the right equipment, wear the proper clothing and exercise strong judgment and reason when in situations that could be detrimental to your health or physical[injuryinformation.com]
  • An increase of intracranial pressure not only damages tissue, but it also prevents adequate oxygen and blood flow through the brain. Without blood and oxygen, the brain dies.[allabouttbi.com]

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