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Cannabis Sativa


Presentation

  • The clinical presentation of a C. sativa allergy varies from mild to life-threatening reactions and often seems to depend on the route of exposure.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] the band was never missing, while in monoecious plants it was never present.[doi.org]
Turkish
  • Spanish canapa Italian canapa comune Italian gewone hennep Dutch cânhamo-comum Portuguese maconha Portuguese (BR) hampa Swedish vanlig hampa Swedish アサ Japanese asa Japanese конопля посевная Russian hamp Danish hamp Norwegian hamppu Finnish hint keneviri Turkish[gd.eppo.int]
  • Weed, Yesil (Turkish, ‘the green one’), Zhara Cannabis sativa is an annual, herbaceous plant that is probably originally native to south Central Asia.[entheology.com]
  • The Tunisian majun and the Turkish or Syrian majun are of the ma'agun type, but do not contain the same spices and condiments.[web.archive.org]
Congestive Heart Failure
  • heart failure, and strokes Respiratory effects Transient bronchodilatation may occur after an acute exposure.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Gagging
  • The MADC3 and MADC4 sequences were shown to encode gag/pol polyproteins of copia-like retrotransposons.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The MADC3 and MADC4 sequences were shown to encode gag/pol polyproteins of copia -like retrotransposons.[doi.org]
  • The mode of their execution is the following: a waggon is loaded with brushwood, and oxen are harnessed to it; the soothsayers, with their feet tied together, their hands bound behind their backs, and their mouths gagged, are thrust into the midst of[classics.mit.edu]
Compulsive Disorder
  • CONCLUSION: Future clinical trials involving patients with different anxiety disorders are warranted, especially of panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorders.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Incontinence
  • Cannabis based-medicines, including CBD-enriched extracts, have been shown to reduce urinary urgency, incontinence episodes, frequency, and nocturia in patients with multiple sclerosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The effect of cannabis on urge incontinence in patients with multiple sclerosis: a multicentre, randomised placebo-controlled trial (CAMS-LUTS). Int Urogynecol J Pelvic Floor Dysfunct . 2006;17(6):636-641. PubMed Google Scholar Crossref 129.[doi.org]
Urinary Urgency
  • Cannabis based-medicines, including CBD-enriched extracts, have been shown to reduce urinary urgency, incontinence episodes, frequency, and nocturia in patients with multiple sclerosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Nocturia
  • Cannabis based-medicines, including CBD-enriched extracts, have been shown to reduce urinary urgency, incontinence episodes, frequency, and nocturia in patients with multiple sclerosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

Polyps
  • In vivo, CBD BDS reduced AOM-induced preneoplastic lesions and polyps as well as tumour growth in the xenograft model of colon cancer.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Trophoblastic Cells
  • Together, these results suggest that THC interferes with trophoblast turnover, preventing trophoblast cell death and differentiation, and contribute to disclose the cellular mechanisms that lead to pregnancy complications in women that consume cannabis-derived[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • Previously, from 2003 to 2014, he served as Senior Medical Advisor and study physician to GW Pharmaceuticals for three Phase III clinical trials of Sativex for alleviation of cancer pain unresponsive to optimized opioid treatment and studies of Epidiolex[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Plants under HPS treatment were taller and had more flower dry weight than those under treatments AP673L and NS1. Treatment NS1 had the highest CBG content. Treatments NS1 and AP673L had higher CBD and THC concentrations than the HPS treatment.[karger.com]
  • Planta 149 , 413–415 Google Scholar Reid, M.S.; Paul, J.L.; Farhoomand, M.B.; Kofranek, A.M.; Staby, G.L. (1980): Pulse treatment with silver thiosulphate complex extends the vase life of cut carnations. J. Am. Soc. Hort.[doi.org]

Prognosis

  • The cohort, although small, was therefore considered representative of recurrent glioblastoma multiforme routinely found in the clinical practice, which would make the study unbiased towards patients with better prognosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Etiology

  • Overall, our study provides new insights into the etiology of cannabis use and its relation with mental health.[doi.org]
  • Overall, our study gives new insights about the etiology of cannabis use and its relation with mental health.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Epidemiology

  • Wallace, M.Sc., M.D.* Irene Ensminger Stecher Professor of Epidemiology and Internal Medicine Department of Epidemiology University of Iowa College of Public Health Iowa City John Williams, M.D.[www8.nationalacademies.org]
  • Epidemiological analysis of alcohol and drug use as risk factors for psychotic experiences . J Nerv Ment Dis 1990; 178 : 473–480. 18. van Os J , Bak M , Hanssen M , Bijl RV , de Graaf R , Verdoux H .[doi.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Bernd Nilius, Giovanni Appendino and Grzegorz Owsianik , The transient receptor potential channel TRPA1: from gene to pathophysiology , Pflügers Archiv - European Journal of Physiology , 10.1007/s00424-012-1158-z , 464 , 5 , (425-458) , (2012) .[dx.doi.org]

Prevention

  • THC also diminished the generation of oxidative and nitrative stress and the oxidized form of glutathione, whereas the reduced form of this tripeptide was increased, suggesting that THC prevents ST cell death due to an antioxidant effect.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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