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Cat Bite


Presentation

  • In the present case report, tooth eruption was absent in the anterior mandibular arch.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Sepsis
  • "If any of these infections are left untreated they certainly can spread to the blood stream causing sepsis, organ damage and even death," said Torvinen.[eu.rgj.com]
  • A general physical examination to rule out systemic sepsis is also essential. Plain radiographs should be obtained for all bites.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Lymphadenopathy
  • The entire upper extremity should be examined for signs of cellulitis, deep space infections (abscesses), lymphadenopathy, and lymphangitis. A general physical examination to rule out systemic sepsis is also essential.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Veterinarian
  • […] irrigating the bite wound with water and isopropyl alcohol. [22] [23] [9] Often, a tetanus shot is prescribed. [8] If a cat that has bitten another cat or animal and appears to be ill, the cat would benefit from an assessment and possible treatment by a veterinarian[en.wikipedia.org]
Dentist
  • Williams BJ published a review and case report of orofacial dog bites detailing the role of the pediatric dentist. 2 Dental follicle infection of primary maxillary canine following a dog bite has also been reported. 5 There are no other reports of dog[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Hunting
  • Hudspeth MK, Hunt Gerardo S, Citron DM, Goldstein EJ. Growth characteristics and a novel method for identification (the WEE-TAB system) of Porphyromonas species isolated from infected dog and cat bite wounds in humans.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Diarrhea
  • Other signs of infection can include diarrhea, fever, nausea, vomiting and severe fatigue, according to Torvinen. In short, cleaning a wound and keeping an eye on it afterward are both essential steps in care.[eu.rgj.com]
Thrombosis
  • "Cathrombosis: Deep Vein Thrombosis After a Cat Bite - A Case Report". Cureus. 11 (6). doi : 10.7759/cureus.4924. a b c d Philipsen, T. E. J.; Molderez, C.; Gys, T. (2006-01-01). "Cat And Dog Bites. What To Do?".[en.wikipedia.org]
Tachycardia
  • […] from the cat bite can impair mobility or cause tenosynovitis or arthritis. [10] In these cases, surgical consultation is needed to assess severity. [3] [4] Some unusual complications, like deep-vein thrombosis, [5] subcutaneous emphysema [11] and fetal tachycardia[en.wikipedia.org]
Eruptions
  • In the present case report, tooth eruption was absent in the anterior mandibular arch.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Rabies
  • Seek medical attention if the cat has not been vaccinated against rabies. [21] If a cat has bitten someone, and there is no evidence that the cat has been vaccinated against rabies, the person will be treated for rabies infection. [19] Epidemiology [[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Tetanus and rabies immunization history must be verified and vaccination and immune globulin must be given when indicated. In all cases of cat bites, prophylaxis with amoxycillin clavulanate is necessary.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Immunization against tetanus and rabies (where indicate) is advised. REFERENCES 1. Tan JS. Human zoonotic infections transmitted by dogs and cats. Arch Intern Med. 1997; 157 :1933–43. [ PubMed ] [ Google Scholar ] 2. Weiss HB, Friedman DI, Coben JH.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Meningism
  • […] significant source of wound infection in humans. 6 Saliva of many animals contains a wide variety of bacteria, predominantly Bacteroides species, Pasteurella multocida and Porphyromonas species which can result in fatal complications such as cellulitis, meningitis[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • A recent Mayo Clinic study shows that one out of three people who sought treatment for a cat bite to the hand were hospitalized.[eu.usatoday.com]
  • Management of infection can be divided into cleansing of the wound, antibiotic prophylaxis, and antibiotic treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Discuss the treatment of cat bites according to severity of the injury. DISCUSSION Animal bites are a common entity among patient visits to the emergency department.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] ill, the cat would benefit from an assessment and possible treatment by a veterinarian.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • If the wound does stop bleeding and is not too large in size, following-up with normal wound care treatment is a next course of action, she recommended.[eu.rgj.com]

Epidemiology

  • Seek medical attention if the cat has not been vaccinated against rabies. [21] If a cat has bitten someone, and there is no evidence that the cat has been vaccinated against rabies, the person will be treated for rabies infection. [19] Epidemiology [[en.wikipedia.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Prevention

  • When you're finished, apply an antibiotic cream to the bite to help prevent an infection. Finally, cover the bite with a bandage to keep dirt and bacteria out. For advice from our Medical co-author, like how to prevent future cat bites, scroll down![wikihow.com]
  • Vaccination of the cat can prevent rabies being transmitted by the cat through a bite.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Providers generally give patients a prophylactic antibiotic to prevent infections from occurring if [stiches are required]." Additionally, about 20 percent of cat scratches become infected, whether stiches are needed or not.[eu.rgj.com]
  • INTRODUCTION The primary objective of diagnosis and treatment of traumatic injuries affecting children in the primary dentition is the prevention of damage to the developing permanent dentition.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Sellers; Public Health Image Library (PHIL), Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC-USA)[sahealth.sa.gov.au]

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