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Cataract - Ataxia - Deafness

Cataract-Ataxia-Deafness Syndrome


Presentation

  • She is board certified in Neurology (1997-present) and is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, the American Neurological Association and the Movement Disorder Society.[books.google.com]
  • A sensorineural hearing loss may also be present in childhood but sometimes not until later. Hyperreflexia with extensor plantar responses and Achilles tendon contractures are often present later.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu]
  • Presentation [ 5 , 6 ] Refsum's disease presents with anosmia and early-onset retinitis pigmentosa, with variable neuropathy, deafness, ataxia and ichthyosis. The age of presentation varies from age 7 months to over 50 years.[patient.info]
  • Occasionally patients will present with late-onset forms of this disease.[neuroweb.us]
Hemophilia A
  • Urinary System Disorders 189 Genetic Conditions in Cats 199 Hemophilia Hyperoxaluria Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy 203 BreedRelated Health Problems 221 91 228 98 235 165 238 101 257 Metabolic Disorders 103 Metabolic Disorders Amyloidosis Cholesterol Ester[books.google.com]
  • A Hemophilia B Hemophilia B, Leyden Hemophilia B, Brandenburg Hemorrhagic Diathesis due to Antithrombin Pittsburgh Heparin Cofactor II Deficiency Hepatic Lipase Deficiency Hereditary Angioedema, Type II Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia, Type 2[sequencing.com]
Physician
  • Written for practicing clinicians, this volume is an excellent reference for physicians, audiologists, and other professionals working with individuals with hearing loss and their families, and can also serve as a text for clinical training programs and[books.google.com]
  • In-Depth Information The Monarch Initiative brings together data about this condition from humans and other species to help physicians and biomedical researchers.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • A physician can detect cataracts through a comprehensive eye exam. Treatment for cataracts usually involves surgery to remove the old lens and replace with an artificial lens.[diseaseinfosearch.org]
  • Edge;Sync-n-Scale;mCharts Received income in an amount equal to or greater than 250 from: The Physicians Edge, Cliexa Received stock from RxRevu; Received ownership interest from Cerescan for consulting;.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Movement Disorder
  • Disorder Fabry Disease Faciogenital Dysplasia with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Factor H Deficiency Factor V and Factor VIII Deficiency, Combined Factor V Deficiency Factor VII Deficiency Factor X Deficiency Factor XI Deficiency Factor XII[sequencing.com]
Amyloidosis
  • Urinary System Disorders 189 Genetic Conditions in Cats 199 Hemophilia Hyperoxaluria Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy 203 BreedRelated Health Problems 221 91 228 98 235 165 238 101 257 Metabolic Disorders 103 Metabolic Disorders Amyloidosis Cholesterol Ester[books.google.com]
  • I Amyloidosis I, Hereditary Neuropathic Amyloidosis III Amyloidosis, Familial, Finnish Type Amyloidosis, Familial, Visceral Amyloidosis, Reactive Amyloid Systemic Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy, Cardiac or Denmark Type Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy, German-American[sequencing.com]
Respiratory Disorders
  • Disorders 187 List ofAbbreviations 259 36 262 102 264 Index 315 Aggression 323 著作権[books.google.com]
Decrease in Height
  • […] body height Small stature [ more ] 0004322 Tremor Tremors 0001337 Visual impairment Impaired vision Loss of eyesight Poor vision [ more ] 0000505 Percent of people who have these symptoms is not available through HPO Autosomal recessive inheritance 0000007[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
Progressive Sensorineural Deafness
  • Orpha Number: 1368 Disease definition Cataract - ataxia -deafness syndrome is characterised by mild intellectual deficit, congenital cataract, progressive sensorineural deafness and ataxia. It has been described in two sisters.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • ., macrothrombocytopenia and progressive sensorineural deafness ( OMIM ) and a form of nonsyndromic deafness ( DFNA17 ), are also caused by mutation in the MYH9 gene.[mendelian.co]
Tremor
  • Tremors 0001337 Visual impairment Impaired vision Loss of eyesight Poor vision [ more ] 0000505 Percent of people who have these symptoms is not available through HPO Autosomal recessive inheritance 0000007 Distal sensory impairment Decreased sensation[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • He is current or past member of numerous scientific and medical advisory boards of national foundations including the Worldwide Education and Awareness for Movement Disorders (WE MOVE), Dystonia Medical Research Foundation, International Tremor Foundation[books.google.com]
  • The most common of all involuntary movements, tremor can affect various body parts such as the hands, head, facial structures, vocal cords, trunk, and legs; most tremors, however, occur in the hands.[galactosemia.org]
  • Symptoms / Signs Growth delay Delayed skeletal maturation Short stature Severe global developmental delay Intellectual disability Seizures Trembling during precise movement (intention tremor) Poor muscle coordination (ataxia) Walks with legs spaced far[undiagnosed.hms.harvard.edu]
  • Other clinical problems in CS include hearing loss (of any type, but affecting both ears), cataracts, visual impairment due to retinal degeneration, tremor, walking and balance problems (ataxia), joint contractures, progressive loss of body fat and abnormal[amyandfriends.org]
Polyneuropathy
  • Title Other Names: Cataract ataxia deafness syndrome; Polyneuropathy, cataract, deafness syndrome; Begeer syndrome; Cataract ataxia deafness syndrome; Polyneuropathy, cataract, deafness syndrome; Begeer syndrome; Cataract-ataxia-deafness-retardation syndrome[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • Prevention - PHARC (Retinitis Pigmentosa, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Cataract, and Polyneuropathy) Not supplied. Diagnosis - PHARC (Retinitis Pigmentosa, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Cataract, and Polyneuropathy) Not supplied.[checkorphan.org]
  • The peripheral polyneuropathy is predominantly demyelinating with both sensory and motor components and is present in all adults. Cerebellar atrophy, primarily in the vermis, can be demonstrated on MRI examination.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu]
  • Cataracts and photophobia caused by impaired pupillary light responses. [ 7 ] Peripheral polyneuropathy. Absent or diminished deep tendon reflexes. Palpable peripheral nerves secondary to hypertrophy. Cerebellar ataxia.[patient.info]
  • Beriberi polyneuropathy is often found and consists, in contrast to alcoholic polyneuropathy, of non-painful motor neuropathy affecting distal leg muscles.[neuroweb.us]
Peripheral Neuropathy
  • neuropathy 0009830 30%-79% of people have these symptoms Nystagmus Involuntary, rapid, rhythmic eye movements 0000639 Short stature Decreased body height Small stature [ more ] 0004322 Tremor Tremors 0001337 Visual impairment Impaired vision Loss of[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • Macrocephaly,peripheral neuropathy,hyporeflexia. Adult syndrome consists of leukodysrophy, cortical blindness, and spasticity. Peripheral neuropathy is rare. Dx B-gaclactocerebrosidase measurement. Maple suryp urine disease Rarely to live to age 5.[cmdg.org]
  • Peripheral neuropathy, Fiskerstrand type Overview Polyneuropathy, hearing loss, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa, and cataract (PHARC) is a neurodegenerative disease marked by early-onset cataract and hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa, and involvement of[checkorphan.org]
  • neuropathy Personality disorder Petit mal seizures Pituitary tumour Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Psychosis Psychotic depression R Renal dialysis Retinal treatment Retinopathy S Schizo-affective disorder Schizophrenia Scotoma Seizures Sight in[gov.uk]
Dystonia
  • AAN) Movement Disorders Research Award, sponsored by the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, the Guthrie Family Humanitarian Award, presented by the Huntington’s Disease Society of America, the Tourette Syndrome Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the Dystonia[books.google.com]
  • […] ataxia and extrapyramidal signs (dystonia).[neuroweb.us]
  • […] fetal morbidity Clinical Cardiac defects–eg PDA, pulmonary valve stenosis, VSD, hepatosplenomegaly, interstitial pneumonia, LBW, congenital cataracts, deafness, microcephaly, petechia, purpura, CNS Sx–eg, mental retardation, lethargy, irritability, dystonia[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • 12 Dystonia, Adult-onset Dystonia, Dopa-responsive Dystonia, Torsion Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Cardiac Valvular Form Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Progeroid Form Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Spondylocheiro[sequencing.com]
  • 18 Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dyskinesia With Or Without Epilepsy And/Or Hemolytic Anaemia Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dyskinesia With Or Without Epilepsy And/Or Hemolytic Anemia Paroxysmal Exertion-Induced Dystonia With Or Without Epilepsy And/Or Hemolytic[ukgtn.nhs.uk]
Stroke
  • He then accepted a fellowship at the National Institutes of Health, in the Experimental Therapeutics Branch of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Maryland under Thomas N. Chase (1992-1994).[books.google.com]
  • […] dementia Limb disability Low blood sugar Lumboperitoneal shunt Lung cancer Lymphoma M Macular degeneration Malignant brain tumours Malignant melanoma Manic depressive psychosis Marfan syndrome Medulloblastoma Memory problems (severe) Meningioma Mini-stroke[gov.uk]
  • Disorders (diseases of the glands that release hormones) Hypothyroidism Vitamin E deficiency Nutritional Deficiencies Vitamin B12 deficiency Neoplastic (Tumor) - Primary or Metastatic Paraneoplastic (Associated with a distant tumor) Vascular Causes (Stroke[cmdg.org]
  • Learn more about how to achieve it with Mendelian Learn more Other signs and symptoms that you may find interesting Rod-cone dystrophy and EEG abnormality, related diseases and genetic alterations Wide nasal bridge and Ischemic stroke, related diseases[mendelian.co]
  • Leukocytes were diluted in 300 μL of deionized water and homogenized at 4 C (glass/Teflon; 10 strokes).[journals.plos.org]

Workup

Dyslipidemia
  • Kompoliti’s include the gender differences in Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders, studies to define the effect of neuroleptics on weight, risk for diabetes and dyslipidemia in patients with Tourette syndrome, and define the current status[books.google.com]

Treatment

  • You may also want to contact a university or tertiary medical center in your area, because these centers tend to see more complex cases and have the latest technology and treatments.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • Treatment Treatment Options: Treatment is directed at symptoms. Visually significant cataracts may require removal. Low vision aids and physical therapy can be helpful.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu]
  • Food and Drug Administration has chosen Wave Life Sciences’ planned phase 2/3 study of suvodirsen, its lead experimental therapy for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, to break new ground.[globalgenes.org]
  • Treatment - PHARC (Retinitis Pigmentosa, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Cataract, and Polyneuropathy) Treatment is directed at symptoms. Visually significant cataracts may require removal. Low vision aids and physical therapy can be helpful.[checkorphan.org]
  • Please do not use this information to diagnose or develop a treatment plan for a health problem or disease without consulting a qualified health care provider.[undiagnosed.hms.harvard.edu]

Prognosis

  • Prognosis - PHARC (Retinitis Pigmentosa, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Cataract, and Polyneuropathy) Not supplied. Treatment - PHARC (Retinitis Pigmentosa, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Cataract, and Polyneuropathy) Treatment is directed at symptoms.[checkorphan.org]
  • Diagnosis and Prognosis: The diagnosis is most likely made collaboratively by an ophthalmologist and a neurologist. It may require testing by an ERG (electroretinogram), and MRI imaging.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu]
  • Prognosis Although there are many (often severe) clinical features associated with Refsum's disease, it is partially treatable with dietary restriction.[patient.info]
  • The prognosis is usually bad with survival rates less than a few years after onset.[neuroweb.us]
  • […] lenses of the eye are small, spherical and prone to subluxation Ectopia lentis (partial displacement of the lens) which leads to lenticular myopia Iridonesis (an iris that is not held in place by the lens) Glaucoma (which resists treatment) Poor visual prognosis[tsbvi.edu]

Etiology

  • Slit lamp examination, careful history, and appropriate serological testing help to determine the cause of interstitial keratitis, directing appropriate treatment according to the etiology.[webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu]
  • Systematic review of the etiology of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in children. Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2004 Sep. 68(9):1193-8. [Medline]. Mehta D, Noon SE, Schwartz E, et al.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • CEP164 Nephronophthisis CEP250 recessive Usher syndrome CEP290/BBS14 Bardet-Biedl syndrome, Leber congenital amaurosis, Joubert syndrome, Senior-Loken syndrome, Meckel syndrome CERKL Retinitis pigmentosa CFH age-related macular degeneration, complex etiology[molecularvisionlab.com]
  • […] may be present in adolescence and result in spontaneous rupture of the anterior lens capsule. 57 Posterior subcapsular cataract occurs quite frequently; however, many patients receive glucocorticosteroids for their renal condition, which may play an etiologic[entokey.com]

Epidemiology

  • Chapters on epidemiology, embryology, non-syndromic hearing loss, and syndromic forms of hearing loss have all been updated with particular attention to the vast amount of new information on molecular mechanisms, and chapters on clinical and molecular[books.google.com]
  • Diagnosis: Cogan's Syndrome EPIDEMIOLOGY Predominantly young to middle aged adults Rare SIGNS Interstitial keratitis (limbal stromal opacity or edema, non-inflammed vascular loops in the mid-stroma) Other inflammation of the eye ( episcleritis, scleritis[webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu]
  • The epidemiology of hearing impairment in the United States: newborns, children, and adolescents. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2009 Apr. 140(4):461-72. [Medline]. Morzaria S, Westerberg BD, Kozak FK.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • In this review, we summarise the clinical, genetic and pathophysiological features of this condition, and the investigations used in its diagnosis.[acnr.co.uk]
  • The pathophysiologic mechanisms of hearing loss are unknown but Merchant et al identified separation of the basilar membrane and the basement membrane and cellular dysmorphology within the organ of corti. [17] Norrie Disease is a rare disorder caused[emedicine.medscape.com]

Prevention

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends two doses of rubella vaccine for all children, given as combination measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, with doses at least four weeks apart.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Prevention - PHARC (Retinitis Pigmentosa, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Cataract, and Polyneuropathy) Not supplied. Diagnosis - PHARC (Retinitis Pigmentosa, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Cataract, and Polyneuropathy) Not supplied.[checkorphan.org]
  • Resources About Genetic Hearing Loss from Around the Web "A Parent's Guide to Genetics of Hearing Loss" - Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage Medscape Reference Genetic Sensorineural Hearing Loss[babyhearing.org]
  • It is present in green vegetables but is tightly bound to chlorophyll. [ 9 ] Diets that are very low in phytanic acid ( The diet should contain enough calories (high in carbohydrates) to prevent weight loss, as this will lead to mobilisation of phytanic[patient.info]
  • Mohr-Tranebjaerg syndrome XLR 3 TMEM126A 612988 Optic Atrophy 7 AR 0 WFS1 606201 noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus / Diabetes mellitus type II; Wolfram syndrome; Deafness, autosomal dominant 6/14/38; Wolfram-like syndrome AD, AR 17 To date, there is no preventative[centogene.com]

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