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Cerebrovascular Disorder

Cerebrovascular Disease


Presentation

  • Fifteen cases of unilateral gustatory disturbance due to central lesions, including the present cases, have been reported to our knowledge.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • As per available reports about 450 journals, 444 Conferences, 18 workshops are presently dedicated exclusively to Cerebrovascular Disease and about 436,000 articles are being published on the current trends in Cerebrovascular Disease.[omicsonline.org]
  • Vascular malformations: This refers to abnormalities present in arteries or veins. Vascular dementia : Cognitive impairment that is usually permanent.[healthline.com]
  • These patients present with a large number of lesions and more severe symptoms that arise in much younger individuals.[sciencedaily.com]
  • A structural lesion unrelated to migraine pathogenesis presents with clinical features typical of migraine.[medlink.com]
Prolonged Bleeding
  • However, it should also be noted that thrombolysis, due to its effects on the coagulation system at high doses, can be difficult to blind completely due to the obvious signs of bleeding (prolonged bleeding at venepuncture sites, easy bruising, gingival[doi.org]
Snoring
  • Snoring and cerebral infarction. Lancet. 1985 ; 2 : 1325–1326. Crossref Medline Google Scholar 406 Palomaki H, Partinen M, Erkinjuntti T, Kaste M. Snoring, sleep apnea syndrome, and stroke. Neurology. 1992 ; 42 (7 suppl 6): 75–81;discussion 82.[doi.org]
Venous Insufficiency
  • Aortic arch syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia) Arterial embolism (Medical Encyclopedia) Arteriogram (Medical Encyclopedia) Cerebral angiography (Medical Encyclopedia) Duplex ultrasound (Medical Encyclopedia) Venous insufficiency (Medical Encyclopedia) Venous[icdlist.com]
Joint Deformity
  • NURSING INTERVENTIONS : Improve mobility and preventing joint deformities because flexor muscles are stronger than extensor muscles, a posterior splint is applied at night to the affected extremity may prevent flexion and maintain correct positioning[slideshare.net]
Loss of Peripheral Vision
  • Loss of peripheral vision Manifestation: Difficulty seeing at night. Unaware of objects or the borders of objects. Nursing Implications/ Patient Teaching Applications: Place objects in center of patient’s intact visual field.[slideshare.net]
Loss of Attention
  • Cognitive deficits Manifestation: Short and long term memory loss. Decreased attention span. Impaired ability to concentrate. Poor abstract reasoning. Altered judgement.[slideshare.net]
Decreased Attention Span
  • Decreased attention span. Impaired ability to concentrate. Poor abstract reasoning. Altered judgement. Nursing Implications/ Patient Teaching Applications: Reorient patient to time, place, and situation, frequently.[slideshare.net]

Workup

  • "Extensive workup, including fasting lipid panel and transesophageal echocardiogram, was only significant for methamphetamine in the urine," they wrote. "No cocaine or other illicit drugs were detected."[medpagetoday.com]
  • (See Workup.) Axial noncontrast computed tomography scan of the brain of a 60-year-old man with a history of acute onset of left-sided weakness.[emedicine.com]
  • Asymptomatic carotid artery occlusion (ACAO) is most frequently discovered as an incidental finding during radiological workup for cerebrovascular disease or after auscultation of a neck bruit. 3 Improvements in ultrasound technology and wide-scale diffusion[doi.org]
Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
  • ventricular hypertrophy Points 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Age 55-56 57-59 60-62 63-64 65-67 68-70 71-73 74-76 77-78 79-81 82-84 SBP-untrd 95-106 107-118 119-130 131-143 144-155 156-167 168-180 181-192 193-204 205-216 or SBP-trtd 95-106 107-113 114-119 120[web.archive.org]
  • Individual components of the combined outcomes were prespecified and examined, as were other secondary outcomes including cancer, incident electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy, end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (dialysis, renal transplant, or[doi.org]
  • ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiogram (ECG).[doi.org]
  • Treated systolic blood pressure, mm Hg 95–106 107–113 114–119 120–125 126–131 132–139 140–148 149–160 161–204 205–216 History of diabetes No Yes Cigarette smoking No Yes Cardiovascular disease No Yes Atrial fibrillation No Yes Left ventricular hypertrophy[doi.org]

Treatment

  • Treatment is recommended when the risk of the aneurysm rupturing outweighs the risks of treatment.[hus.fi]
  • Treatment is personalized for each patient by choosing from the most advanced medical, endovascular and surgical treatments, as well as ongoing clinical trials.[neurosurgery.ucsf.edu]
  • Steve Roach, Kerstin Bettermann, and José Biller have completely revised and updated sixth edition of the highly respected standard for stroke diagnosis and treatment, adding chapters on genetics, pregnancy-related stroke, and acute treatment.[books.google.com]
  • Neurologists work with doctors trained in brain and nervous system surgery ( neurosurgeons ) and others to provide inpatient and outpatient treatment for people who have strokes and other cerebrovascular diseases.[mayoclinic.org]

Prognosis

  • Prognosis Although stroke is a disease of the brain, it can affect the entire body. A common disability that results from stroke is complete paralysis on one side of the body, called hemiplegia.[ninds.nih.gov]
  • If ES worsens prognosis, the prophylactic use of anticonvulsants in patients at risk is warranted.[doi.org]
  • Abstract The etiology of ischemic stroke affects prognosis, outcome, and management. Trials of therapies for patients with acute stroke should include measurements of responses as influenced by subtype of ischemic stroke.[doi.org]

Etiology

  • The TOAST classification denotes five subtypes of ischemic stroke: 1) large-artery atherosclerosis, 2) cardioembolism, 3) small-vessel occlusion, 4) stroke of other determined etiology, and 5) stroke of undetermined etiology.[dx.doi.org]
  • Covered topics include differential diagnosis, etiological determination, radiologic investigations, and management of patients within the National Service Framework.[curlie.org]
  • Imaging, laboratory, and clinical data studies do not suggest nonischemic etiology: possible alternative etiologies ARE ruled out. 1. Sudden onset of pure motor hemiplegia that persists with normal CT at 12 hours after onset.[doi.org]

Epidemiology

  • Website: Aims & Scope The subject areas include, but are not limited to the following fields: Aneurysms Arterial Development Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Closed Cardiovascular System Cor Pulmonale Coronary Circulation Coronary Heart Disease Embolism Epidemiology[hrpub.org]
  • February 2014, Vol.20, No.1 doi: 10.1212/01.CON.0000443838.95260.4b REVIEW ARTICLES Article Related Links Abstract This article discusses the physiologic changes of pregnancy and how they affect risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and then reviews epidemiology[journals.lww.com]
  • While the experimental evidence is exciting and provocative, epidemiological evidence also suggests a link between alcohol consumption and stroke.[doi.org]
  • Global Overview of the Epidemiology of Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease. Arch Med Res. 2015 Jul;46(5):328-38. Seidel GA, Giovannetti T, Libon DJ. Cerebrovascular disease and cognition in older adults. Curr Top Behav Neurosci. 2012;10:213-41.[cambridgecognition.com]
  • Epidemiology of Stroke in Innherred, Norway, 1994 to 1996 Incidence and 30-Day Case-Fatality Rate Hanne Ellekjær, MD ; Jostein Holmen, MD, PhD ; Bent Indredavik, MD ; Andreas Terent, MD, PhD From Innherred Hospital, Levanger, and National Institute of[web.archive.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • […] following fields: Aneurysms Arterial Development Atherosclerosis Cardiomyopathy Closed Cardiovascular System Cor Pulmonale Coronary Circulation Coronary Heart Disease Embolism Epidemiology Heart Failure Hypertension Inflammatory Heart Disease Ischemia Pathophysiology[hrpub.org]
  • The tests within this battery measure the dysfunction in specific brain circuitry often impaired in patients and are firmly rooted in a scientific understanding of the pathophysiology of cerebrovascular disease.[cambridgecognition.com]
  • Acute ischemic cerebrovascular syndrome (AICS) describes a spectrum of clinical presentations that share a similar underlying pathophysiology: cerebral ischemia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The term acute ischemic cerebrovascular syndrome describes a spectrum of clinical presentations that share a similar underlying pathophysiology: cerebral ischemia.[doi.org]

Prevention

  • NURSING INTERVENTIONS : Improve mobility and preventing joint deformities because flexor muscles are stronger than extensor muscles, a posterior splint is applied at night to the affected extremity may prevent flexion and maintain correct positioning[slideshare.net]
  • In the latter group, neurosurgery is required to treat and prevent hemorrhages. In the prevention of cerebral artery occlusions, neurosurgical methods are only effective in certain exceptional situations.[hus.fi]
  • Prompt treatment of hemorrhagic disease may prevent more serious damage to the person affected.[disabled-world.com]
  • You can prevent high blood pressure by excercising regularly, eating healthily, not smoking and drinking alcohol in moderation.[nhsdirect.wales.nhs.uk]
  • The Neurovascular Disease and Stroke Center at UCSF Medical Center brings an integrated, interdisciplinary approach to screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment for stroke and conditions that put patients at high risk for stroke, including brain[neurosurgery.ucsf.edu]

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