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Coltivirus


Presentation

  • I. pacificus – West Coast Rocky Mountains at 4,000-10,000 feet of altitude E. chaffeensis, E. ewingii – southeastern, south central, and mid-Atlantic states EML – Wisconsin and Minnesota Clinical presentation Influenza-like illness Rash – uncommon (can[arupconsult.com]
  • More severe cases present as headache, myalgia, photophobia, rash, conjunctivitis, and hemorrhaging. The disease is self-limiting; however, red blood cells retain the virus for several months, so patients should not donate blood during this time.[chegg.com]
  • Consultant Virologist and Director, Clinical Microbiology and Public Health Laboratory, Cambridge UK, 1991-2002 (Clinical Director of Pathology, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, 1998-2002); Senior Research Fellow, CNRS, Gif-sur-Yvette, France, 2002-present[books.google.es]
  • The resulting bootstrapped neighbor-joining tree drawn from these alignments, using bluetongue virus (BTV) as an outgroup, is presented in Fig. 4B .[jvi.asm.org]
  • Properties, Genome, and Replication Seadornavirus has 7 structural proteins, 5 of which are present in the core ( 37 ). The viruses are icosahedral with a diameter of 60–70 nm, and the core has a diameter of 50 nm.[doi.org]
Falling
  • Abstract RNA viruses of filamentous fungi fall into two broad categories, those that contain double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes in rigid particles and those that are more closely related to positive-sense, single-stranded RNA viruses with dsRNA replicative[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Fungal viruses classified as dsRNA viruses fall within two broad categories. The “true” dsRNA viruses have rigid particles containing genomic dsRNA that is not polyadenylated on either strand.[jvi.asm.org]
  • Diagnosis depends on isolation of the virus, demonstration of antigen in the red blood cells, or demonstration of a fourfold rise or fall in antibody titer from the acute to the convalescent phase.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Fishing
  • Journal of Fish Diseases 27: 687–692. Further Reading Barber TL and Jochim MM (1985) Bluetongue and related orbiviruses. Progress in Clinical and Biological Research 178: 1–746. Bowen GS (1988) Colorado tick fever. In: Monath TP (ed.)[els.net]
  • Certain Orthoreovirus, Orbivirus, Coltivirus, and Rotavirus species infect humans; Phytoreovirus and Fijivirus species infect plants and insects; the cypoviruses (the cytoplasmic polyhidrosis viruses) infect insects, and aquareoviruses infect fish.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Reoviruses constitute one of the largest virus families in terms of numbers of genera and breadth of host range, which includes plants, arthropods, fish, and mammals ( 21 ; see reference 25 for review).[jvi.asm.org]
Anorexia
  • The most serious of these diseases is Colorado tick fever, characterized by diphasic fever, headache, muscle pain, anorexia, leukopenia, and weakness; some cases are complicated by encephalitis, hemorrhage, thrombocytopenia, or pericarditis; death is[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Chronic Infection
  • Pathogenesis Colorado tick fever coltivirus chronically infects the tick Dermacentor andersoni, which transmits it to humans.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Steatorrhea
  • Reovirus infections have been observed in patients with various conditions such as fever, exanthema, upper and lower respiratory tract illnesses, gastrointestinal illness (including steatorrhea), hepatitis, pneumonitis, keratoconjunctivitis, neonatal[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Lethargy
  • Colorado tick fever virus can cause a fever, chills, headache, photophobia , myalgia , arthralgia , and lethargy. Children, in particular, may develop a hemorrhagic disease.[findwords.info]
  • Colorado tick fever virus can cause a fever, chills, headache, photophobia, myalgia, arthralgia, and lethargy. Children, in particular, may develop a hemorrhagic disease.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • It includes the causative agent of Colorado tick fever . [1] Colorado tick fever virus can cause a fever, chills, headache, photophobia , myalgia , arthralgia , and lethargy. Children, in particular, may develop a hemorrhagic disease.[en.wikipedia.org]

Workup

Erythroblast
  • Erythrocytes, which are enucleated red blood cells, seem to be infected while they are erythroblasts, their nucleated precursor stage. The virus stays in these red blood cells without harming it for up to four months.[microbenotes.com]
  • Erythrocytes , which are enucleated red blood cells, seem to be infected while they are erythroblasts , their nucleated precursor stage. [4] The virus stays in these red blood cells without harming it for up to four months. [6] Here, it is protected from[en.wikipedia.org]
Rickettsia Rickettsii
  • All life stages of this tick can transmit Colorado tick fever virus (CTFV) to humans, and Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) rickettsia (Rickettsia rickettsii) to humans, cats, and dogs.[tickencounter.org]
  • CTFV is endemic in northwestern North America, where it causes CTF, a human disease initially confused with a mild form of Rocky Mountain spotted fever, which is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii.[wwwnc.cdc.gov]
Complement Fixing Antibody
  • These include 1) a complement-fixation test that is relatively insensitive because in 25% of patients complement-fixing antibodies are not detected and in 75% of patients these antibodies appear late after infection; 2) a seroneutralization assay for[wwwnc.cdc.gov]
Viral Inclusion Body
  • Electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that TarTV particle had a non-enveloped bilayer icosahedral structure, and viral inclusion bodies were formed in infected cells.[pubag.nal.usda.gov]
  • These structures are similar to viral inclusion bodies produced during orbivirus infections ( 15 ).[wwwnc.cdc.gov]
Lymphocytic Infiltrate
  • Patients with neurologic disorders (meningitis, meningoencephalitis, encephalitis) show lymphocyte infiltration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the virus has been isolated from CSF.[wwwnc.cdc.gov]

Treatment

  • Treatment resulted in delayed rotavirus excretion and milder symptoms.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Treatment of Coltivirus No specific antiviral treatment is available. Patients with suspected CTF are given supportive care as appropriate. Prevention and control of Coltivirus No vaccine to prevent CTF.[microbenotes.com]
  • What is the treatment for CTF? Supportive care. No salicylates (aspirin) should be used because of thrombocytopenia and rare occurrence of bleeding disorders following CTF virus infection.[quizlet.com]
  • The best way to avoid getting bitten and catching this disease is wearing long sleeves or pants, avoiding high tick-infested areas, and wearing tick repellent. [4] Treatment [ edit ] Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) procedure Colorado[en.wikipedia.org]

Prognosis

  • (Outcomes/Resolutions) Colorado Tick Fever is usually self-limiting and the prognosis excellent, even when patients have severe neurological problems.[dovemed.com]
  • Prognosis The prognosis for patients with Colorado tick fever is excellent, even in cases complicated by neurologic symptoms. Although prompt recovery is the expected outcome, rare fatalities have been reported.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Etiology

  • Their role as agents of such illnesses remains unclear since convincing evidence of an etiologic association remains elusive.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Florio L, Stewart M and Mugrage ER (1946) The etiology of Colorado tick fever. Journal of Experimental Medicine 83: 1–10.[els.net]
  • The etiology of Colorado tick fever. J Exp Med. 1946 ; 83 : 1 – 10. DOI Koprowski H, Cox HR, Miller MS, Florio L. Response of man to egg-adapted Colorado tick fever virus. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1950 ; 74 : 126 – 31.[wwwnc.cdc.gov]
  • Pathophysiology and Etiology The cause of Colorado tick fever is infection with the causative agent that is transmitted by a tick bite. This agent is a double-stranded RNA virus of the genus Coltivirus in the family Reoviridae.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Epidemiology

  • This ELISA will be useful to clarify the epidemiological status and the suspected pathogenicity of the virus.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] information about: ISBN: 9781498819732 1498819737 OCLC Number: 1024250029 Description: 1 online resource (17 pages) Contents: COLTIVIRUS INFECTIONS: GLOBAL STATUS; Copyright; Introduction: The GIDEON e-book series; Table of Contents; Colorado tick fever; Epidemiology[worldcat.org]
  • Fauquet has extensive experience in field virology and epidemiology, but also in molecular and experimental virology. He is mostly interested in tropical plant viruses and particularly in geminiviruses that are devastating tropical crops.[books.google.es]
  • Epidemiology Group A rotaviruses are ubiquitous and infect most individuals by the third year of life.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Epidemiology of Coltivirus The virus that causes Colorado tick fever is the second most common Arbovirus in the United States, and several hundred cases are reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) annually.[microbenotes.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Pathophysiology and Etiology The cause of Colorado tick fever is infection with the causative agent that is transmitted by a tick bite. This agent is a double-stranded RNA virus of the genus Coltivirus in the family Reoviridae.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Prevention

  • Prevention and control of Coltivirus No vaccine to prevent CTF.[microbenotes.com]
  • GENE EXPRESSION The dsRNA genome is never completely uncoated, to prevent activation of antiviral state by the cell in response to dsRNA. The viral polymerase VP1 synthesizes a capped mRNA from each dsRNA segment.[expasy.org]
  • It belongs to medical microbiology and it is very important for clinics, public health and prevention.[chinacdc.cn]
  • The importance of rotavirus as a cause of diarrheal illness in infants and young children throughout the world indicates that an effective vaccine is needed to prevent rotavirus-induced illness.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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