Edit concept Question Editor Create issue ticket

Congenital Absence of Thigh and Lower Leg with Foot Present

Congenital Bilateral Absence of Thigh and Lower Leg with Foot Present


Presentation

  • Q72.10 Congenital absence of unspecified thigh and lower leg with foot present Q72.11 Congenital absence of right thigh and lower leg with foot present Q72.12 Congenital absence of left thigh and lower leg with foot present Q72.2 Congenital absence of[icd10data.com]
  • Q72.10 Congenital absence of unspecified thigh and lower leg with foot present Q72.11 Congenital absence of right thigh and lower leg with foot present Q72.12 Congenital absence of left thigh and lower leg with foot present Q72.13 Congenital absence[codelay.com]
  • ICD-10 Q7210 (Q72.10) Diagnosis Congen absence of unsp thigh and lower leg w foot present (Congenital absence of unspecified thigh and lower leg with foot present) Additionally, you can get information about the “Q7210” (ICD-10) code mapping to the ICD[hipaaspace.com]
  • […] malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities Congenital malformations and deformations of the musculoskeletal system Q72 - Reduction defects of lower limb Q721 Code Q72.1 Code: Q721 Description: Congenital absence of thigh and lower leg with foot present[icd-code.org]
Fishing
  • […] addition to the drug-induced anomalies, other cases of phocomelia may have a genetic basis Phocomelia was probably recognized in the early years of Babylonian rule, because the teratologic records of Chaldea mention an infant with hands and feet like fish[wordinfo.info]
Precocious Puberty
  • puberty-obesity syndrome X-linked intellectual disability-psychosis-macroorchidism syndrome X-linked intellectual disability-retinitis pigmentosa syndrome X-linked intellectual disability-seizures-psoriasis syndrome X-linked intellectual disability-spastic[se-atlas.de]
Steatorrhea
  • PubMed Steatorrhea: a common manifestation in patients with HIV/AIDS. Steatorrhea: a common manifestation in patients with HIV/AIDS. Nutrition. 1996 Jul-Aug;12(7-8):507-10. PubMed Your browsing activity is empty. Activity recording is turned off.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Fecal Incontinence
  • […] rarely abnormal. 78 , 82 Urinary tract infection is the predominant sign in an affected infant, but urinary retention is occasionally seen. 77 Once a child is toilet trained, the onset of secondary urinary incontinence, especially in conjunction with fecal[pediatrics.aappublications.org]
Coxa Valga
  • : · valga · vara Q65.9 Congenital deformity of hip, unspecified Q66 Congenital deformities of feet Excludes: reduction defects of feet ( Q72.- ) valgus deformities (acquired) ( M21.0 ) varus deformities (acquired) ( M21.1 ) Q66.0 Talipes equinovarus Q66.1[apps.who.int]
  • […] dislocation of right hip, unilateral Q6532Congenital partial dislocation of left hip, unilateral Q654Congenital partial dislocation of hip, bilateral Q655Congenital partial dislocation of hip, unspecified Q656Congenital unstable hip Q6581Congenital coxa[cms.gov]
  • The angle between the head and neck of the femur and the shaft may be abnormally diminished (coxa vara) or increased (coxa valga).[dartmouth.edu]
Behavior Disorder
  • disorders syndrome X-linked hypophosphatemia X-linked intellectual disability due to GRIA3 mutations X-linked intellectual disability with isolated growth hormone deficiency X-linked intellectual disability with marfanoid habitus X-linked intellectual[se-atlas.de]

Workup

  • Isolated coccygeal dimples do not require further workup or treatment. FIGURE 9 Benign coccygeal dimple within the gluteal cleft and overlying the tip of the coccyx.[pediatrics.aappublications.org]
  • […] poorly understood but it is likely that age-related changes of the skin, cutaneous nerves and other parts of the nervous system play a role. 22 Treating Dry Skin That Is Concomitant With Common Diseases Certain disease states can cause xerosis so in the workup[podiatrytoday.com]

Treatment

  • Babies with birth defects often need special care and treatments. The treatments may include surgery, medicines, assistive devices, and therapies. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Intersex (Medical Encyclopedia) [ Read More ][icdlist.com]
  • Treatment by Syme amputation: Indications and technique. Syme amputation: An evaluation of the physical and psychological function in young patients. Amputation and prosthesis as definitive treatment in congenital absence of the fibula.[wheelessonline.com]
  • Treatment Cerebral palsy can’t be cured, but treatment will often improve a child's capabilities.[childneurologyfoundation.org]
  • Surgical removal is the usual treatment. A check should be made for other deformities. Syndactyly (web toes) - needs no treatment but check for other deformities.[patient.info]
  • TREATMENT: Treatment must be individualized based on the severity of the deformity and on the presence or absence of associated deformities.[gait.aidi.udel.edu]

Prognosis

  • Prognosis Cerebral palsy doesn’t always cause profound disabilities and for most people with CP the disorder does not affect life expectancy.[childneurologyfoundation.org]
  • Prognosis A congenital limb deficiency has a profound effect on the life of the child and his or her parents.[healthofchildren.com]
  • Prognosis A congenital limb deficiency has a profound effect on the life of the child and parents. However, occupational therapy can help the child learn to accomplish many tasks.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Establishing a diagnosis is crucial for prognosis, management, and treatment strategies and for ascertaining an accurate recurrence risk for future offspring,” they wrote in a 2011 study. 6 Hypotonia in chromosomal abnormalities “Individuals with Down[lermagazine.com]
  • Harrold A, Walker C (1983) Treatment and prognosis in congenital club foot. J Bone Joint Surg Br 65: 8–11. View Article Google Scholar 9.[journals.plos.org]

Etiology

  • Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology.[icd10coded.com]
  • The patient did not meet the Duke criteria for infective endocarditis.(1) Acute myocarditis (from HIV or other viral etiologies): Although this may have been the historical etiology of cardiac dysfunction, lack of acuity and absence of chest pain made[hivinsite.ucsf.edu]
  • ETIOLOGY/HISTORY: Congenital longitudinal deficiency of the fibula (CLDF) is the most common congenital defect involving the long bones. Males are affected twice as much as females. The precise etiology remains unknown.[gait.aidi.udel.edu]
  • With transverse or longitudinal deficiency, depending on the etiology, infants may also have hypoplastic or bifid bones, synostoses, duplications, dislocations, or other bony defects; for example, in proximal femoral focal deficiency, the proximal femur[merckmanuals.com]
  • Etiology Although the origins of pes cavus are not completely understood, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest it is a progressive deformity resulting from biomechanical imbalances.[opedge.com]

Epidemiology

  • Epidemiology and etiology of cardiomyopathy in Africa. Circulation. 2005 Dec 6;112(23):3577-83. Review. 5. Report of the WHO/ISFC task force on the definition and classification of cardiomyopathies. Br Heart J. 1980 Dec;44(6):672-3. 6.[hivinsite.ucsf.edu]
  • Contraceptive medication use, hypertension, previous leg injuries, and low intake of cellulose fibbers have also been considered. [5] Epidemiology United States statistics CVI is a significant public health problem in the United States.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Epidemiology /Etiology Lower back pain is severely common in general population, but lumbar radiculopathy has only been reported with an incidence of 3 to 5%. [3] 5-10% of patients with low back pain have sciatica. the annual prevalence of disc related[physio-pedia.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Pathophysiology and treatment". The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine. 66 (3): 143–55. PMID 8209551. External links [ edit ] "Congenital amputation". The Free Dictionary.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Pathophysiology Narrowing of the lumbar canal has many potential causes, and various classification schemes have been devised in order to better describe the pathophysiology of this condition.[aafp.org]
  • Back to Top Pathophysiology Neurotrophic Ulcers The development of neurotrophic foot ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus has several components, including neuropathy, biomechanical pressure, and vascular supply.[clevelandclinicmeded.com]
  • Normal Embryology and the Pathophysiology of Spinal Cord Tethering Dysraphic CNS malformations arise during the second, third, and fourth weeks of human embryogenesis, generally referred to as the period of neurulation.[pediatrics.aappublications.org]
  • Pathophysiology Various mechanisms are associated with failure of superficial venous valves. Most commonly, congenitally weak vein walls dilate under normal pressures to cause secondary valve failure.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Prevention

  • Treatable - 0% Emergent - ED Care Needed - Preventable/Avoidable - 0% Emergent - ED Care Needed - Not Preventable/Avoidable - 0% Primary diagnosis of injury 0% Primary diagnosis of mental health problems 0% Primary diagnosis of substance abuse 0% Primary[codelay.com]
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Intersex (Medical Encyclopedia) [ Read More ][icdlist.com]
  • […] the proper wearing of military footwear or impairs walking, marching, running, or jumping, are disqualifying. (3) Current or history of clubfoot (754.70) or pes cavus (754.71) that prevents the proper wearing of military footwear or impairs walking,[militaryspot.com]
  • Current or history of clubfoot (754.70) or pes cavus (754.71) that prevents the proper wearing of military footwear or impairs walking, marching, running or jumping is disqualifying.[thebalance.com]

Ask Question

5000 Characters left Format the text using: # Heading, **bold**, _italic_. HTML code is not allowed.
By publishing this question you agree to the TOS and Privacy policy.
• Use a precise title for your question.
• Ask a specific question and provide age, sex, symptoms, type and duration of treatment.
• Respect your own and other people's privacy, never post full names or contact information.
• Inappropriate questions will be deleted.
• In urgent cases contact a physician, visit a hospital or call an emergency service!