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Congenital Elbow Dislocation

Congenital Radial Head Dislocation


Presentation

  • Congenital radial head dislocation is often asymptomatic, which may result in a delayed presentation. Patients usually present in adolescence, when the child starts using the limb more.[radiopaedia.org]
  • It is characterised by holoprosencephaly and limb defects, however other anomalies may also be present. Following the initial description, three further cases have been reported in the literature.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The book brings together a prestigious group of leaders in the field, who share their expertise and experiences to present the full scope of every aspect of elbow procedures.[books.google.com]
  • If these shapes are not present- the radial head and capitellum have not developed normally because it is a problem present since birth (i.e., not a trauma).[congenitalhand.wustl.edu]
  • An 18-year-old man presented with left elbow pain and limited range of motion after being struck by a motor vehicle while on a bicycle.[healio.com]
Asymptomatic
  • […] despite sl loss of extension and supination; - Exam: - pts are often asymptomatic (as in this case) despite the slight loss of extension and supination; - activities requiring full supination may be difficult; - radial head prominence will be noted in[wheelessonline.com]
  • Congenital Radial Head Dislocation Follow-up Care Asymptomatic patients can be as active in sports as their function allows. May consider limiting contact sports.[eorif.com]
  • Congenital radial head dislocation is often asymptomatic, which may result in a delayed presentation. Patients usually present in adolescence, when the child starts using the limb more.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Although it is most often bilateral, unilateral congenital radial head dislocation has been described. 6 Physical Examination Congenital dislocation of the radial head is typically discovered incidentally because it is most frequently an asymptomatic[healio.com]
Back Pain
  • 26 Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip 435 27 Legg0Calv00Perthes Disease 465 28 Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis 481 29 The Knee 495 Congenital Talipes Equinovarus 540 32 Pes Cavus 559 33 Congenital Vertical Talus Congenital Convex Pes Valgus 565 35 Back[books.google.com]
Osteochondral Loose Body
  • Early reconstruction may prevent the long term complication of pain, loss of motion, deformities and osteochondral loose bodies 13.[f1000research.com]
Low Back Pain
  • Back Pain 280 Chapter 137 Lower Cervical Spine Injuries 282 Chapter 138 Lumbosacral Plexus 284 Chapter 139 Mallet Finger 286 Chapter 140 Marfan Syndrome 287 Chapter 141 Median Nerve Disorders 289 Chapter 142 The Meniscus 292 Chapter 143 Metastatic Tumor[books.google.com]
Hip Pain
  • Utilize the very latest approaches in hip surgery including hip resurfacing, hip preservation surgery, and treatment of hip pain in the young adult; and get the latest information on metal-on-metal hips so you can better manage patients with these devices[books.google.com]
Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Neuropathy 374 Chapter 181 Peroneal Nerve Palsy 376 Chapter 182 Pes Cavus 378 Chapter 183 Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis 380 Chapter 184 Physeal Growth Plate Fractures 383 Chapter 185 Pilon Fractures 385 Chapter 186 Plantar Fasciitis 387 Chapter 187[books.google.com]
  • Cubital tunnel syndrome is a common peripheral neuropathy. It arises from compression of the ulnar nerve within the cubital tunnel, where the nerve passes beneath the cubital tunnel retinaculum.[radiologyassistant.nl]

Workup

Treatment

  • Treatment and prognosis Treatment is largely non-operative in the majority of cases 3 with analgesics and follow-up.[radiopaedia.org]
  • : - treatment is directed to alleviating pain, increasing motion, and improving appearance; - if pt is doing well, recommended treatment is observation; - Operative Treatment: - excision of radial head is contraindicated in a skeletally immature pt, but[wheelessonline.com]
  • Sports-related injuries, as well as treatment of children's elbow injuries, are addressed extensively.[books.google.com]

Prognosis

  • Treatment and prognosis Treatment is largely non-operative in the majority of cases 3 with analgesics and follow-up.[radiopaedia.org]
  • This has a less complicated prognosis with no surgery required. Complex Elbow Dislocation - involves the rupture of the ligaments and bone fractures mostly to the forearm.[pathologies.lexmedicus.com.au]
  • What Is the Prognosis for a Dislocated Elbow? Generally, this injury heals well and has a good prognosis.[emedicinehealth.com]
  • (Outcomes/Resolutions) The long-term prognosis of an Elbow Dislocation is usually good, in a majority of the individuals.[dovemed.com]

Etiology

  • […] synonyms: Congenital Radial Head Dislocation ICD-10 Q68.8 Other specified congenital musculoskeletal deformities Congenital Radial Head Dislocation Etiology / Epidemiology / Natural History most common congenital anomaly of the elbow etiology unknown[eorif.com]
  • Etiology The underlying abnormality is hypothesized to be failure of development of a normal capitulum, causing loss of contact pressure required for normal development of the radial head.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Regardless of the etiology, radial head dislocation causes rather mild deformity and lameness and can be treated by conservative management, surgical correction, or radial head ostectomy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Examination revealed a stable elbow, supporting a congenital etiology for the radial head dislocation.[healio.com]

Epidemiology

  • […] synonyms: Congenital Radial Head Dislocation ICD-10 Q68.8 Other specified congenital musculoskeletal deformities Congenital Radial Head Dislocation Etiology / Epidemiology / Natural History most common congenital anomaly of the elbow etiology unknown[eorif.com]
  • 335 21 Developmental Anomalies of the Hand 339 22 The Shoulder and Elbow 356 238pt Brachial Plexus Injuries Peripheral Nerve Injuries 365 Section 2 The Lower Limb 387 25 The Limping Child 423 37 Spondylolisthesis 638 Part V Fractures 647 39 Fracture Epidemiology[books.google.com]
  • […] separation of the distal radius and ulna for a time the proximal radius and ulna are united and share a common perichondrium abnormal genetic or teratogenic factors operating at this time would interfere with proximal radioulnar joint morphogenesis Epidemiology[gait.aidi.udel.edu]
  • The epidemiology of elbow fracture in children : Analysis of 335 fractures, with special reference to supracondylar humeral fractures. J Orthop Sci 2001;6:312-5. 4. 阿部宗昭. 小児上腕骨顆上骨折治療上の問題点. 整・災外1981;24:5-14. 5. 阿部宗昭. 肘周辺骨折. 日本小児整形外科学会教育研修委員会編.[molcom.jp]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • There is no support for the common assumption that a relatively small head of the radius as compared to the neck of the radius predisposes the young to this injury. [ citation needed ] Pathophysiology [ edit ] The distal attachment of the annular ligament[en.wikipedia.org]

Prevention

  • Etiology and Prevention The etiology of elbow stiffness is the basis for its classification, diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Traumatic causes of elbow stiffness include fractures, dislocations, crush injuries, burns and head injury.[consultqd.clevelandclinic.org]
  • Its purpose is to prevent movement of the arm at the elbow. Usually, the arm will be placed in a sling to help the patient hold the splint in a level position and to prevent pressure on the elbow joint.[emedicinehealth.com]
  • Physical therapy is recommended which helps to control pain and swelling, prevent formation of scar of soft tissue, and also helps in collagen formation.[middlesexortho.com]
  • The situation is rare in adults, or in older children, because the changing shape of the radius associated with growth prevents it.[en.wikipedia.org]

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