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Congenital facial nerve palsy


Presentation

  • We present a 65-year-old man with Darier disease with pityriasis amiantacea on the scalp, alopecia, and congenital facial nerve palsy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of these entities is discussed in detail in a clear, easy to understand format.[books.google.com]
  • When I was born I was what was known as a "facial presentation" birth and I came out "face first" instead of "head first".[facial-palsy.com]
  • We present a case of a 4-day-old infant girl with a familial history of renal disease, who was hospitalized because of congenital unilateral facial palsy, which subsequently appeared to be a part of BOR syndrome and led to the diagnosis of congenital[link.springer.com]
  • If the patient presents later then a number of other surgical options maybe required.[southernplasticsurgery.com.au]
Developmental Delay
  • delay: Mild Poland syndrome: 1 patient Congenital heart disease Atrial septal defects Similar genetic changes in cardiofacial syndrome Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome Recessive Facial Nerve Trauma & Tumors Trauma Petrous bone fracture Surgery: Middle ear[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]
Cerebral Palsy
  • The doctors did not rule out cerebral palsy until I was about 10 years of age.[facial-palsy.com]
Lagophthalmos
  • In this report, a case of a male infant, with the features of hemi facial microsomia, anotia, vertebral anomalies, congenital facial nerve palsy and lagophthalmos is described.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Average preoperative lagophthalmos was 4.41mm. Average postoperative lagophthalmos was 0.5mm, 1.36mm, 1.57mm, 1.6mm and 1.34mm at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 1 year and 2 years respectively.[iovs.arvojournals.org]
  • Lower eyelid surgery for lagophthalmos in Mobius and Poland-Mobius syndromes. J Craniofac Surg. 2011;22:e53-e54. Rankin JK, Andrews C, Chan WM, Engle EC. HOXA1 mutations are not a common cause of Mobius syndrome. J AAPOS. 2010;14:78-80.[rarediseases.org]
  • Lagophthalmos is not just on gentle and forced closure, it is during blink as well and this is something ignored traditionally by doctors when assessing the ability of the eyelids to close.[ramanmalhotra.com]
  • A first large series of thin-profile platinum eyelid weight implantations has been introduced for the treatment of lagophthalmos.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Alopecia
  • We present a 65-year-old man with Darier disease with pityriasis amiantacea on the scalp, alopecia, and congenital facial nerve palsy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Pulsatile Tinnitus
  • The focus is on patients presented with vertigo, disequilibrium, hearing loss, pulsatile and non-pulsatile tinnitus, facial nerve weakness, and complications of the otitis media.[books.google.com]
Social Isolation
  • Self-consciousness and social isolation frequently arise in the wake of these physical changes. The goals of surgery include protecting the eye, preventing drooling and re-establishing facial symmetry both in motion and at rest.[myplasticsurgery.gr]
  • Self-consciousness and social isolation frequently arise in the wake of these physical changes. Innovative surgical techniques are now available to restore the paralyzed face.[methodistfacialparalysis.com]
  • It is no surprise that the diagnosis of facial paralysis can be devastating and socially isolating to the patient affected.[uchealth.com]
Behavior Disorder
  • disorder 10 Motor disability, general: 88% Poor coordination (83%) Hypotonia: Congenital Poland syndrome : Some patients Malformations Hands: Deformities Legs: Hypoplasia Möbius & Congenital facial syndromes: Types Facial Nerve Trauma & Tumors Trauma[163.178.103.176]
  • disorder 10 Motor disability, general: 88% Poor coordination (83%) Hypotonia: Congenital Poland syndrome : Some patients Malformations Hands: Deformities Legs: Hypoplasia Laboratory EMG Neurogenic: Normal or low amplitude motor unit potentials No spontaneous[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]
Fear
  • […] the management of the fetus and the neonate with the latest information on the developmental neurology and pathology of the developing central nervous system, so that they can provide prompt and informed treatment of neurological disability - the most feared[books.google.com]
Dysarthria
  • Flaccid dysarthria results from the facial muscle paralysis.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Inability to abduct past midline Patterns Bilateral: 90% Abducens nerve palsy, isolated: 9% Conjugate horizontal gaze paresis: 48% Duane retraction syndrome : 34% Congenital fibrosis of extraocular muscles : 9% Bulbar Palate and pharynx dysfunction: 56% Dysarthria[163.178.103.176]
  • There can be dysarthria to no intelligible speech, mental retardation and epilepsy 17. TREATMENT: The correction of facial asymmetry in congenital facial palsy presents a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeons.[jemds.com]

Workup

  • Further workup of facial nerve palsy is dictated by clinical suspicion of the underlying cause of facial weakness.[eyewiki.aao.org]

Treatment

  • Focused on treatment: key points boxes pick out the most important information for the busy specialist. Evidence-based information: extensively referenced with the latest and most important papers and articles.[books.google.com]
  • It’s extremely integral for treatment to be tailored to the patient and their particular disorder.[facialparalysisinstitute.com]
  • ; congenital; Bell’s palsy; and relapsing from a prior treatment.[medicaldaily.com]
  • Treatment with prednisolone should begin within 3 days (72 hours) of the symptoms starting. Bell's palsy is rare in children, and most children who are affected make a full recovery without treatment.[nhs.uk]

Prognosis

  • However, in a majority of the cases, the facial nerve palsy resolves on its own, without therapy; although, close clinical monitoring is initially necessary The prognosis of Facial Nerve Palsy due to Birth Trauma is usually excellent with treatment Who[dovemed.com]
  • Prognosis of secondary facial facials depends on the success and management of the primary disease process.[eyewiki.aao.org]
  • The prognosis for good recovery is better in cases when the paresis is only partial. Facial nerve palsy has a broad differential diagnosis.[clinicaladvisor.com]
  • […] age group, the prognosis for full recovery is excellent in approximately 95% of cases.[primarypsychiatry.com]
  • Lacrimation: Mildly affected in some patients Taste: No clinically significant changes in most patients Sensory loss 7 Mild or None May be present on face or tongue: On side of paralysis Possibly related to involvement of greater superficial petrosal nerve Prognosis[163.178.103.176]

Etiology

  • The etiology was undetermined. [ 1 ] COMMENT. This appears to be the first report of familial congenital facial palsy. A partial agenesis of the facial nerve nucleus is considered in etiology.[pediatricneurologybriefs.com]
  • Typically, the combination of sensory and motor symptoms correlate to intra-cranial CN 7 pathology, while isolated motor symptoms are associated with extra-cranial CN 7 lesions. [1] Etiology There are numerous possible etiologies of facial nerve palsy[eyewiki.aao.org]
  • Pathology Etiology perinatal trauma intrauterine posture intrapartum compression familial and congenital aplasia of the facial nerve nucleus cardiofacial syndrome Mobius syndrome (bilateral) Poland syndrome (only occasionally associated with CFP) Goldenhar[radiopaedia.org]
  • Subclavian artery supply disruption sequence: Hypothesis of vascular etiology for Poland, Klippel Feil and Möbius anomalies. Am J Med Genet 1986;23:903-18. [ PUBMED ] 7. Caravella L, Rogers GL.[jmgims.co.in]
  • Abstract The anatomy of the facial nerve and the various etiologic factors in both congenital and acquired facial paralysis in children have been reviewed.[pediatrics.aappublications.org]

Epidemiology

  • Epidemiology CFP are reported with an incidence of 0.2% of live births, making it a rare cause of facial palsy.[radiopaedia.org]
  • […] tightly together: Difficulty keeping food in mouth Facial muscle atrophy (Late) Electrophysiology EMG Denervation Synkinesis: Late Blink reflex Abnormal ipsilateral R1 (early, disynaptic) R2 (late multisynaptic) responses Synkinesis (Late) Bell's Palsy 8 Epidemiology[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]
  • Epidemiology In 2007, the Moebius Syndrome Foundation estimated that there were at the time a total of approximately 2,000 cases of Moebius Syndrome worldwide [6].[physio-pedia.com]
  • […] droop Loss of forehead &d nasolabial folds Drooping of corner of mouth Uncontrolled tearing Inability to close eye Lips cannot be held tightly together: Diificulty keeping food in mouth Facial muscle atrophy (Late) Facial Paresis: Left Bell's Palsy 8 Epidemiology[163.178.103.176]
  • Epidemiology and Risk Factors The overall prevalence of facial nerve palsy has been estimated at 2-3 cases per 10 000 people in the general population. [5] Facial nerve palsy affects individuals regardless of sex, age, or race.[eyewiki.aao.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • The pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and management of these entities is discussed in detail in a clear, easy to understand format.[books.google.com]
  • Pathophysiology of Bell’s Palsy Many patients with Bell’s palsy have been found to have rising antibody titers to herpes simplex virus. 31 Different pathophysiological processes have been suggested, 31 including active viral invasion or immune processes[primarypsychiatry.com]
  • Pathophysiology  Main cause of Bell's palsy is latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes zoster virus), which are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia  Edema of nerve within inelastic fallopian canal  Recovery begins by 3 weeks[slideshare.net]

Prevention

  • The goals of surgery include protecting the eye, preventing drooling and re-establishing facial symmetry both in motion and at rest.[myplasticsurgery.gr]
  • You can't prevent Bell's palsy Because it's probably caused by an infection, Bell's palsy can't be prevented. It may be linked to the herpes virus. You'll usually only get Bell's palsy once, but it can sometimes come back.[nhs.uk]

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