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Diverticulosis

Diverticular Disease


Presentation

  • Presentation of jeujunoileal diverticulosis in young age is virtually unknown. It is associated with middle or old age. It is usually asymptomatic but may present with vague abdominal pain and episodic nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Fever
  • We report a case of a woman admitted to our Department with acute abdominal pain and fever. The surgical and histological investigation, revealed a rare coexistence that has never been mentioned in the published medical literature.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Diverticulitis is a more serious condition that causes localized abdominal pain and tenderness, nausea, fever, vomiting, chills or constipation. While Dr.[manhattangastroenterology.com]
Fatigue
  • We ask about general symptoms (anxious mood, depressed mood, fatigue, pain, and stress) regardless of condition. Last updated: January 30, 2019[patientslikeme.com]
  • However, the Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome Association of America explains that “weight loss can be a side effect of any gastrointestinal disorder.”[livestrong.com]
  • Signs and symptoms of familial dilated cardiomyopathy can include an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), shortness of breath (dyspnea), extreme tiredness (fatigue), fainting episodes (syncope), and swelling of the legs and feet.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Common symptoms of heart failure include shortness of breath, fatigue and swelling of the ankles, feet, legs, abdomen and veins in the neck.[heart.org]
  • DCM usually presents with any one of the following: (1) Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion); (2) arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease[flybase.org]
Veterinarian
  • The Health Professionals Follow-up Study is a prospective cohort study initiated in 1986 when 51 529 male dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, optometrists, osteopathic physicians, and podiatrists aged 40 to 75 years returned a self-administered questionnaire[dx.doi.org]
  • METHODS Study Population The Health Professionals Follow-up Study is a prospective cohort study initiated in 1986 when 51,529 male dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, optometrists, osteopathic physicians and podiatrists, aged 40-75 years, returned a[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Dentist
  • The Health Professionals Follow-up Study is a prospective cohort study initiated in 1986 when 51 529 male dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, optometrists, osteopathic physicians, and podiatrists aged 40 to 75 years returned a self-administered questionnaire[dx.doi.org]
  • METHODS Study Population The Health Professionals Follow-up Study is a prospective cohort study initiated in 1986 when 51,529 male dentists, veterinarians, pharmacists, optometrists, osteopathic physicians and podiatrists, aged 40-75 years, returned a[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Vietnamese
  • CONCLUSION: RD was common in this Vietnamese population, and the prevalence was higher than in the Caucasian control group. 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • ., Fiore, J. ( 2015 ) Right-sided diverticulosis and disparities from left-sided diverticulosis in the Vietnamese population living in Boston, Mass., USA: a retrospective cohort study. Med Princ Pract 24: 355 – 361.[doi.org]
Abdominal Pain
  • It can present with a wide range of clinical scenarios and when patients experience chronic symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, nausea, bacterial overgrowth, or malabsorption, medical therapy is successful in most patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Nausea
  • It is usually asymptomatic but may present with vague abdominal pain and episodic nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea. It can lead to complications like bleeding, perforation and obstruction.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Diverticulitis can cause abdominal pain, fever, nausea and altered bowel habits. Symptoms Most people with diverticulosis do not have any symptoms.[arizonadigestivehealth.com]
Rectal Bleeding
  • SCAD most often presents with rectal bleeding and subsequent endoscopic visualization reveals a well localized process with non-specific histopathologic inflammatory changes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • One complication of diverticular disease is rectal bleeding. Diverticular Disease Menu What is diverticular disease? Diverticular disease consists of two conditions: diverticulosis and diverticulitis.[my.clevelandclinic.org]
  • Rectal bleeding Formation of a narrowing of the colon that prevents easy passage of stool (called a stricture) Formation of a tract or tunnel to another organ or the skin (called a fistula).[fascrs.org]
Intermittent Dysphagia
  • Esophageal intramural pseudo-diverticulosis (EIPD) is a rare disease characterized by multiple small flask-shaped pouches in the esophageal wall, with the predominant symptom of chronic progressive or intermittent dysphagia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Wide Neck
  • Although fecal matter is commonly found within wide-necked diverticula, the relationship between the ingestion of a particular food and subsequent trauma to a diverticulum is largely speculative, and the exact mechanisms leading to diverticular complications[dx.doi.org]
  • While fecal matter is commonly found within wide-necked diverticula, the relationship between the ingestion of a particular food and subsequent trauma to a diverticulum is largely speculative, and the exact mechanisms leading to diverticular complications[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

  • See Workup for more detail. Treatment of diverticulitis The management of patients with diverticulitis depends on their presentation severity, presence of complications, and comorbid conditions.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Treatment

  • Although novel treatment options are yet to become available, the addition of therapies based on mesalazine (mesalamine) and probiotics may enhance treatment efficacy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • The prognosis varies if complications develop and is particularly serious in the case of peritonitis. About 90% of people who have a colon resection do not have symptoms return after the surgery.[womenshealthmag.com]
  • Treatment and prognosis The majority of patients remain asymptomatic throughout life and no treatment is required. A high fiber diet may reduce the incidence of diverticula and rate of complications 7.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Mortality/Morbidity The prognosis is good even with complications.[emedicine.com]

Etiology

Epidemiology

  • This review will focus on the history and epidemiology of diverticulosis in regard to age, sex, race, geography, and the epidemiology of complicated diverticular disease.[dx.doi.org]
  • Article Navigation 1 From the Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, and Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston. 3 Address reprint requests to WH[doi.org]
  • Those pouches however, are false diverticula (also called pseudiverticula), meaning that not all layers of the intestinal wall are affected. 2 Epidemiology Diverticulosis is an example of diseases of affluence in developed countries, promoted by a diet[flexikon.doccheck.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • The underlying pathophysiology of the syndrome of post-diverticulitis IBS is discussed and clinical markers of centrally driven symptoms suggested as a means to avoid ineffective colonic resections in those with IBS-like diverticular disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Pathophysiology The cause of this condition is not known. It is believed to develop as the result of abnormalities in peristalsis, intestinal dyskinesis, and high segmental intraluminal pressures.[emedicine.com]

Prevention

  • Finally, there is not currently adequate evidence to recommend any medical treatment for the prevention of diverticulitis recurrence.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Several different medications have been studied in hopes of preventing recurrent diverticulitis in patients who have had one or more attacks.[patients.gi.org]

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