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Enterobacter


Presentation

  • At presentation, it is challenging to determine rare organisms in a timely fashion; however, emergent extensive surgical intervention of an accelerated aberrant disease process should be considered to avoid catastrophic outcomes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • KPC was present in 88.6% of E. aerogenes and in all E. cloacae resistant to carbapenems.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Among these clinical strains, four presented resistant phenotypes during successive imipenem and colistin treatments.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We present a case of post-neurosurgical ventriculitis caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacter cloacae successfully treated with intraventricular colistin.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • A case of fever with rigors is presented and on ultrasound and CT examination was found to have portal venous gas which resolved with adequate antibiotic treatment. Blood culture revealed growth of gram negative bacillus; Enterobacter aerogenes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Painter
  • Painter, D. Suber, D. Shungu, L. Silver, K. Inglima, J. Kornblum, N. Woodford, and D. Livermore, Abstr. 43rd Intersci. Conf. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother., abstr. C2-50, 2003).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome
  • The patient developed septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: We first report an unusual case of sepsis caused by E. aerogenes after liver transplantation in China.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Aspiration
  • A colistin-resistant Enterobacter aerogenes [study code 12264] was isolated from the tracheal aspirate of a 71-year-old male patient in the General Hospital [GH] in Pula, Croatia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Two multiresistant E. aerogenes isolates were recovered from bronchial aspirates of two patients hospitalized in the Intensive Care Unit at the "Santa Maria della Scaletta" Hospital, Imola.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Although some researches demonstrate a bacterial behavior non-producer of biofilm (non-adherent), the infection sites (infectious environment) - tracheal aspirate ( 10 ) and urinary tract ( 21, 25 ) - are important variables in the expression of virulence[scielo.br]
Formication
  • Subsequently 30 μL of formic acid (70%) was added and mixed with the pellet by vortexting. Next, 30 μL of acetonitrile was added and mixed thoroughly.[doi.org]
Fracture
  • Abstract We report a case of osteomyelitis caused by Enterobacter cancerogenus resistant to aminopenicillins in a 56-year-old male who had a motorcycle accident and suffered from multiple bone fractures with abundant environmental exposure.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

  • See Workup for more detail. Management Antimicrobial therapy is indicated in virtually all Enterobacter infections.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Treatment

  • The purpose of this case report is to relate an unusual presentation of liver transplantation to show how successive treatment can be an appropriate option in septic patients after liver transplantation.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract Quinolones are frequently used classes of antimicrobials in hospitals, crucial for the treatment of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Among these clinical strains, four presented resistant phenotypes during successive imipenem and colistin treatments.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] antibiotic treatment in the past 30 days.[nanologix.com]
  • A case of fever with rigors is presented and on ultrasound and CT examination was found to have portal venous gas which resolved with adequate antibiotic treatment. Blood culture revealed growth of gram negative bacillus; Enterobacter aerogenes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • The observed phenomenon may have implications not only for antimicrobial chemotherapy, but also for the prognosis of infectious diseases and infection control.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Thus, it can be presumed that bacteremia caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria may have a poorer prognosis because of the delay in initiating appropriate antimicrobial therapy.[cid.oxfordjournals.org]
  • The prognosis of E cloacae complex infections depends on numerous variables, including the infection site (eg, bloodstream, meninges, lungs), time to diagnosis and treatment, antimicrobial resistance, and underlying host vulnerabilities.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Peña Risk factors and prognosis of nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli [5] M.J. Schwaber, Y.[elsevier.es]

Etiology

  • Major trends in the microbial etiology of nosocomial infection. Am J Med. 1991 Sep 16; 91 (3B):72S–75S. [ PubMed ] [ Google Scholar ] Scheider DM, King PD, Miedema BW.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Introduction Strains of Enterobacter cloacae have been implicated as etiological agents of human intestinal and extraintestinal infections that may cause fatal bacteremia, including skin and soft tissues, intra-abdominal, the urinary tract and central[academic.oup.com]
  • […] infection and impact of resistance on outcomes , Clin Infect Dis , 2001 , vol. 32 (pg. 1162 - 71 ) 12 CDC definitions for nosocomial infections, 1988 , Am J Infect Control , 1988 , vol. 16 (pg. 128 - 40 ) 13 Septic shock in critically ill patients: etiology[cid.oxfordjournals.org]
  • Therefore, this fact underlines the necessity for more accurate, routine methods for bacterial identification and for better understanding of the etiology of urinary tract infection and pathogenesis of the E. cloacae complex [ 11 , 13 ] .[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Irrespective of the etiology, the clinical picture at presentation is usually that of a severe, rapidly progressive disease with acute onset which results in a poor final visual outcome and often loss of the eye.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Epidemiology

  • The epidemiology of the Algerian isolates is compared to previous epidemiological studies of E. cloacae in Algeria in Table 2. The antibiotic resistance results are summarized in Table 3.[doi.org]
  • E. amnigenus was also cultured from the unused package of salined cotton in the container through epidemiologic investigation.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular epidemiology of clinical Enterobacter cloacae bloodstream isolates in Shanghai, China. PLoS ONE. 2017 Dec;12 (12): e0189713. [ PubMed ] [ Crossref ] 10.[journal-imab-bg.org]
  • Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100071, China. 3 College of Food Science, Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Xinxiang, 453003, China. 4 State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • This opportunistic pathogen, similar to other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, possesses an endotoxin known to play a major role in the pathophysiology of sepsis and its complications.[tgw1916.net]
  • PATHOPHYSIOLOGY• These bacteria have an outer membrane that contains, among other things, lipopolysaccharides from which lipid-A plays a major role in sepsis.[de.slideshare.net]

Prevention

  • Results indicated that the use of probiotics to act directly on the TMA in the gut might be an alternative approach to reduce serum TMAO levels and to prevent the development of atherosclerosis and "fish odor syndrome" through the effect of TMA on the[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Author information 1 College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, 510642, China. 2 Institute of Disease Control and Prevention, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100071, China. 3 College of Food Science, Henan[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Disinfectant effectiveness for prevention The necessary spectrum of activity against enterobacteria is: bactericidal[hygiene-in-practice.com]
  • The goal of therapy is to eradicate the infection and to prevent complications.[livestrong.com]
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. New Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Warrant Additional Action by Healthcare Providers. CDC. Feb 14 2013. [Full Text]. Abbott SL, Janda JM.[medscape.com]

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