Edit concept Question Editor Create issue ticket

Erysipeloid

Erysipeloid is a cutaneous infection caused by a bacterial pathogen Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. Skin injury and subsequent occupational exposure to livestock and other animals result in a cellulitis-like lesion, but several distinguishing characteristics may be identified. Patient history, clinical signs and microbiological investigations are necessary during workup, but the diagnosis can be made based on clinical criteria.


Presentation

Erysipeloid is considered to be a zoonotic infection, meaning that exposure to contaminated animal products is a mandatory step in the pathogenesis of the infection [1] [2]. Chicken, turkey, and fish are common animal hosts of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, and its transfer to humans almost exclusively happens after fishing, livestock handling or other occupations involving animal contact [1] [2] [3]. The organism is inoculated onto previously abraded or injured skin (as a result of occupational or accidental injury), and after an incubation period of several days (2-7 in most cases), initial signs and symptoms appear. Because of the nature of acquisition of the infection, lesions predominantly appear on the hands and fingers [4] [5]. Some patients may experience an asymptomatic course of the disease, but burning, itching or throbbing pain at the site of skin injury followed by edema, erythema, and localized inflammation is a typical finding [2] [3]. The lesion is well-defined, contains raised edges and mimics subacute cellulitis, which is why it is often misdiagnosed as erysipelas or cellulitis, caused by streptococcal or staphylococcal species, respectively [3] [5]. Furthermore, the absence of suppuration, together with a history of animal contact and immense pain, are distinguishing features of erysipeloid [3]. In addition, vesicles, bullae, and erosions can be encountered, while proximal lymphadenopathy and signs of more severe infection (fever, arthralgia) are seen in a small number of cases [4] [5]. In the majority of cases, the clinical course is self-limiting, and spontaneous resolution is seen within 3-4 weeks without the need for antibiotic therapy, but in rare cases, relapses have been documented [3] [5].

Fishing
  • We present a case of a 50-year-old housewife whose hobby was fishing, with a reddish, tender patch on the fifth finger and dorsum of the left hand, which developed a week after she had sustained an injury while boning the fish.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In humans, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infections most commonly present in a mild cutaneous form known as erysipeloid or fish poisoning. E. rhusiopathiae can cause an indolent cellulitis, more commonly in individuals who handle fish and raw meat.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • This type of bacteria may be found in fish, birds, mammals, and shellfish. Erysipeloid usually affects people who work with these animals (such as farmers, butchers, cooks, grocers, fishermen or veterinarians).[nlm.nih.gov]
  • It is acquired by handling meat or fish infected with Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. The disease is self-limited, lasting about 3 weeks, but responds to penicillin. Also called fish-handler's disease. Compare erysipelas.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Abstract Erysipeloid, a cutaneous infection with the gram-positive bacillus Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, is typically an occupational dermatosis seen in persons working with livestock or involved in commercial fishing (fishmongers).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Low Fever
  • Symptoms may include: Bright red skin in the infected area Swelling of the area Throbbing pain with itching or burning sensation Fluid-filled blisters Low fever if the infection spreads Swollen lymph nodes (sometimes) The infection may spread to other[nlm.nih.gov]
Falling
  • Late summer, early fall disease. PATHOLOGY : Infection with E. insidiosa occurs in worldwide distribution in a variety of animals, especially hogs. This is an occupational disease.[atsu.edu]
  • The infection is more likely to occur during the summer or early fall. See the image below. Erysipeloid. Courtesy of DermNet New Zealand () and the Waikato District Health Board ().[emedicine.medscape.com]
Asymptomatic
  • The lesion may be asymptomatic or accompanied by mild pruritus, pain and fever. In addition to cutaneous infection, E. rhusiopathiae can cause endocarditis… CONTINUE READING Tweets This paper has been referenced on Twitter 2 times.[semanticscholar.org]
  • The lesion may be asymptomatic or accompanied by mild pruritus, pain and fever. In addition to cutaneous infection, E. rhusiopathiae can cause endocarditis, which may be acute or subacute. Endocarditis is rare and has a male predilection.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Some patients may experience an asymptomatic course of the disease, but burning, itching or throbbing pain at the site of skin injury followed by edema, erythema, and localized inflammation is a typical finding.[symptoma.com]
Anemia
  • Anemia was reported as a frequent feature, and its severity appeared to be correlated with the duration of the infection. Leukocyte counts were normal, but thrombocytopenia was observed.[doi.org]
Thin Skin
  • The rash may be accompanied by thinning skin, changes in skin pigmentation in surrounding areas, itching, burning, and in rare cases, sores may form in the affected area.[ozarkderm.com]
Burning Sensation
  • Symptoms may include: Bright red skin in the infected area Swelling of the area Throbbing pain with itching or burning sensation Fluid-filled blisters Low fever if the infection spreads Swollen lymph nodes (sometimes) The infection may spread to other[nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

The diagnosis of erysipeloid may be difficult to obtain without a proper patient history and a thorough examination of the wound. Firstly, a detailed interview with the patient about his/her occupation and possible animal contact, as well as recent injury to the skin is an essential step in order to suspect Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae as a possible cause. Moreover, a detailed physical examination of the lesion can reveal key features of erysipeloid, and the diagnosis can often be made solely on clinical criteria supported by details from patient history [5]. A confirmation of the pathogen, however, can only be obtained after microbiological testing. A viable sample for cultivation requires a full-thickness biopsy of the lesion (due to the fact that bacteria is located deep within the skin), but the results may be provided after at least 3 or more days [3]. Visualization of thin, gram-positive rods is considered diagnostic, but gram stains and other cultivation methods frequently yield negative results [3]. For this reason, the introduction of novel molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), is slowly being introduced into regular practice, since they can rapidly detect bacterial DNA [2].

Erythroblast
  • See Also: eruv ervil Ervin Ervine Erving Erwin Erwinia Erymanthian boar Erymanthus erysipelas erysipeloid erysipelothrix erythema erythema infectiosum erythorbate erythorbic acid erythrism erythrite erythritol erythro- erythroblast Settings: Click on[wordreference.com]
Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae
  • From Wikidata Jump to navigation Jump to search infections most commonly present in a mild cutaneous Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infectious disease Infection due to E. rhusiopathiae Infection due to Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae edit English erysipeloid[wikidata.org]
  • Erysipeloid is a cutaneous infection caused by a bacterial pathogen Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.[symptoma.com]
  • Our observations suggest that Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is capable of producing L forms that may revert to a bacterial form and produce sepsis at a later time.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Gram-Positive Rods
  • Erysipeloid is a zoonotic infection caused by the gram-positive rod Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae .[jamanetwork.com]
  • Visualization of thin, gram-positive rods is considered diagnostic, but gram stains and other cultivation methods frequently yield negative results.[symptoma.com]
  • Erysipeloid is caused by the non–spore-forming, non–acid-fast, gram-positive rod microorganism, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (insidiosa), which long has been known to cause animal and human infections.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • positive rod similar to actinomycetes Often nonspecific histopathology Dermoepidermal detachment with many neutrophils floating in the blisters Upper and mid-dermis is edematous with vascular dilatation; infiltrate consists mainly of neutrophils and[pathologyoutlines.com]
Gram-Positive Bacteria
  • Entry H01315 Disease Name Erysipeloid; Swine erysipelas Category Infectious disease Brite Infectious diseases [BR: br08401 ] Bacterial infections Infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria H01315 Erysipeloid Human diseases in ICD-11 classification [BR[genome.jp]
  • Definition / general A rare disease, with 50 articles published from 1950 - 2008 Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, formerly named Erysipelothrix insidiosa, is a rod-shaped, nonmotile, gram-positive bacteria that forms long-branching filaments with characteristic[pathologyoutlines.com]
  • Listeria monocytogenes is a small gram-positive bacteria that is widely distributed in nature. A recent review of the world literature found 58 cases of endocarditis due to L. monocytogenes 260.[doi.org]

Treatment

  • We also present a complete review of the clinical and pathologic features of Erysipelothrix infections and their treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The treatment of choice is a single dose of benzathine benzylpenicillin given by intramuscular injection, or a five-day to one-week course of either oral penicillin or intramuscular procaine benzylpenicillin.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Treatment *Mild cases may resolve if heat exposure is avoided *Severe cases may never resolve unfortunately *Treatments to improve appearance of the affected area may be considered There is no specific treatment for Erythema ab igne except for avoiding[ozarkderm.com]
  • Despite local treatment and oral antibiotherapy, there was no improvement. The diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis was confirmed by positive skin smears. Histopathological examinations of a skin biopsy showed no malignancy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] on the patient's occupation (housewife), history of previous traumatic contact with a scorpion fish, typical inflammatory lesions located on one hand, lack of severe systemic features, mild laboratory abnormalities and rapid remission after specific treatment[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • Prognosis Erysipeloid usually is an acute, self-limited infection of the skin that resolves without consequences.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Predicted outcome The prognosis for erysipeloid is excellent. Alternatives A number of infectious and non-infectious skin conditions may mimic erysipeloid. Appropriate specialists Infectious disease specialist, dermatologist, and cardiologist.[nmihi.com]
  • Outlook (Prognosis) Erysipeloid may get better on its own. It rarely spreads. If it does spread, the lining of the heart can become infected. This condition is called endocarditis. References Habif TP. Bacterial infections. In: Habif TP, ed.[ufhealth.org]
  • Outlook (Prognosis) Erysipeloid may get better on its own. It rarely spreads. If it does spread, the lining of the heart can become infected. This condition is called endocarditis . References Habif TP. Bacterial infections. In: Habif TP, ed.[mountsinai.org]

Etiology

  • ERYSIPELOID Etiology and Epidemiology Erysipeloid, an acute infection of traumatized skin caused by E. rhusiopathiae (formerly E. insidiosa), occurs most frequently in fishermen, butchers, kitchen workers, and others who handle raw fish, poultry (especially[dermaamin.com]
  • (V.) panamensis was identified as the etiologic agent. Our cases extend the spectrum of clinical presentations in New World leishmaniasis. Copyright 2005 The American Society of Tropical Medicine Article metrics loading...[ajtmh.org]
  • In the latter case, the etiologic agents are either fastidious extracellular or intracellular bacteria.[doi.org]
  • Etiology. Listeria is gram-positive, non-acid resistant. BORING PIGS Erysipelas suum, Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, Rhusiopathia suia; Eng. - Swine Erysipelas, Diamond disease; see color inset).[en.medicine-guidebook.com]

Epidemiology

  • We report the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of the erysipeloid form of cutaneous leishmaniasis as well as its diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • ERYSIPELOID Etiology and Epidemiology Erysipeloid, an acute infection of traumatized skin caused by E. rhusiopathiae (formerly E. insidiosa), occurs most frequently in fishermen, butchers, kitchen workers, and others who handle raw fish, poultry (especially[dermaamin.com]
  • Epidemiology Frequency Infection with E rhusiopathiae occurs in worldwide distribution in a variety of animals, especially hogs. Race No racial predilection is recognized for erysipeloid.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Submit an Article Received: 19/01/1999 Accepted: 15/03/1999 Cover date: 01/09/1999 Abstract Fulltext Figs (0) References (0) Cited By (140) Supplementary Material (0) Metrics Related Content Preview this: Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae : bacteriology, epidemiology[doi.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Pathophysiology E rhusiopathiae, which is highly resistant to environmental factors, enters the skin through scratches or pricks. In the skin, the organism is capable of producing certain enzymes that help it dissect its way through the tissues.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • (iii) Pathophysiology and echocardiography. Patients suffering from Q fever endocarditis have profound lymphocyte unresponsiveness to C. burnetii that results in a lack of macrophage activation 244.[doi.org]

Prevention

  • Prevention: prevention of minor injuries at work meat - and fish factories (automation of production, work clothes), and immediate processing of skin injuries 2% alcoholic iodine solution, fluid Novikov and other disinfectants.[medicalency.com]
  • Prompt diagnosis and early treatment of the rare but severe systemic erysipeloid are essential to prevent serious or fatal complications.[dermnetnz.org]
  • Get the skills you need now with new information on global humanitarian relief and expedition medicine, plus expanded coverage of injury prevention and environmental preservation.[books.google.com]
  • Using gloves while handling or preparing fish or meat can prevent the infection. Erysipelothricosis - erysipeloid; Skin infection - erysipeloid; Cellulitis - erysipeloid; Erysipeloid of Rosenbach; Diamond skin disease Habif TP. Bacterial infections.[nlm.nih.gov]

References

Article

  1. Boyd AS, Ritchie C, Fenton JS. Cutaneous Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (erysipeloid) infection in an immunocompromised child. Pediatr Dermatol. 2014;31(2):232-235.
  2. Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R. Mandel, Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Churchill Livingstone; 2015.
  3. Murray PR, Rosenthal KS, Pfaller MA. Medical Microbiology. Seventh edition. Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders; 2013.
  4. Veraldi S, Girgenti V, Dassoni F, Gianotti R. Erysipeloid: a review. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2009;34(8):859-862.
  5. Brooke CJ, Riley TV. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae: bacteriology, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of an occupational pathogen. J Med Microbiol. 1999;48(9):789-799.

Ask Question

5000 Characters left Format the text using: # Heading, **bold**, _italic_. HTML code is not allowed.
By publishing this question you agree to the TOS and Privacy policy.
• Use a precise title for your question.
• Ask a specific question and provide age, sex, symptoms, type and duration of treatment.
• Respect your own and other people's privacy, never post full names or contact information.
• Inappropriate questions will be deleted.
• In urgent cases contact a physician, visit a hospital or call an emergency service!
Last updated: 2019-07-11 22:28