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Facial Granuloma


Presentation

  • Case presentation A 3-year-old boy presented for evaluation of multiple facial nodules that had been present for six months. After their initial appearance, the lesions sporadically fluctuated in size but never resolved completely.[escholarship.org]
  • Lesions may be present for weeks or months and tend to follow a chronic course.[accessmedicine.mhmedical.com]
  • Despite the large eosinophilic component, flame figures were not present. Immunohistochemical studies were performed to rule out the possibility of lymphoma.[ijdvl.com]
  • […] with a history of a red-brown well-circumscribed lesion present on the face for a long duration.[dermatologyadvisor.com]
Cat Scratch
  • Cultures for mycobacteria and cat scratch disease serologies were negative. Antibiotic therapy was ineffective; the lesion healed spontaneously with a mean duration of 11 months.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Constitutional Symptom
  • The characteristic appearance and location of the lesions in the absence of adenopathy and constitutional symptoms should make the clinical diagnosis straightforward and prevent unnecessary interventions.[escholarship.org]
Loss of Appetite
  • Common side-effects mentioned in the summary of product characteristics (SPC) include nausea and loss of appetite.[medicaljournals.se]
Hepatosplenomegaly
  • There was no palpable lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly, and the general examination was otherwise unremarkable.[karger.com]
Facial Skin Lesion
  • skin lesions whose course is chronic and slowly progressive. 3 Diagnosis is based on clinical features, histopathology and, more recently, dermatoscopy. 1 Multiple modalities of medical and surgical treatment have been suggested, but none has proved[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Skin Ulcer
  • There was no skin ulceration. No photosensitivity, fever or joint pain was present. Past and personal history was unremarkable. Figure 1: Before treatment - single, grey-brown nodule with prominent follicular orifices over left cheek.[jcasonline.com]
Night Sweats
  • The patient was otherwise systemically well, with no fevers, night sweats, fatigue, weight loss, or symptoms of infection.[karger.com]
Photosensitivity
  • No photosensitivity, fever or joint pain was present. Past and personal history was unremarkable. Figure 1: Before treatment - single, grey-brown nodule with prominent follicular orifices over left cheek.[jcasonline.com]
Facial Edema
  • Among these, there were 68% (27/40) cases of orofacial granulomatosis and 43% (3/7) cases of solid facial edema. [53] In an unpublished study conducted in our department, 10 (52.6%) of 19 cases of clinically diagnosed granulomatous cheilitis showed granulomas[ijdpdd.com]
Facial Burn
  • A mucosal variant of the skin lesion granuloma faciale. Burns BV, Roberts PF, De Carpentier J, Zarod AP. Department of Otolaryngology, North Manchester General Hospital, Manchester.[thedoctorsdoctor.com]

Workup

  • Such a reaction should prompt referral to an allergist or rheumatologist for allergy and autoimmune workup. Major complications. More significant complications include migration of the filler, granuloma formation, and infection. 3 Migration.[aao.org]
Afipia Felis
  • We recorded clinical details about the nodule and its duration, ultrasound study pattern, cultures for bacteria and mycobacteria, and Bartonella henselae and Afipia felis antibody testing.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Ultrasound studies have shown that the lesions are solid and cultures for bacteria and mycobacteria, and antibody tests for Bartonella henselae and Afipia felis are negative [ 4 ].[escholarship.org]
Bartonella Henselae
  • Bartonella henselae titers and the Coccidioidomycosis immitis immunodiffusion test were negative; a Tuberculin Skin Test was non-reactive.[escholarship.org]
  • We recorded clinical details about the nodule and its duration, ultrasound study pattern, cultures for bacteria and mycobacteria, and Bartonella henselae and Afipia felis antibody testing.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Granulomatous Tissue
  • tissue L92.9 (abnormal) (excessive) ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To L92.9 L91 Hypertrophic disorders of skin L91.0 Hypertrophic scar L91.8 Other hypertrophic disorders of the skin L91.9 Hypertrophic disorder of the skin, unspecified L92 Granulomatous disorders[icd10data.com]

Treatment

  • Treatment Options Treatment options are summarized in Table I . Table I. Treatment options for granuloma faciale.[dermatologyadvisor.com]
  • The treatments were performed with 5 mm minimally overlapping spots at 8.0 J/cm 2 for the first treatment and 8.5 J/cm 2 for the second treatment. No anesthesia was needed and there was no significant postoperative discomfort.[jamanetwork.com]
  • Treatment Options Treatment options are summarized in Table I. Table I.[psychiatryadvisor.com]
  • This case supports previous reports of successful treatment of GF with topical tacrolimus. Keywords: Granuloma faciale, tacrolimus, treatment How to cite this article: Gupta L, Naik H, Kumar NM, Kar HK.[jcasonline.com]

Prognosis

  • The patients were reviewed according to demographics, location, treatment, and prognosis. Follow-up was obtained through a questionnaire sent to each referring physician.[mdedge.com]

Etiology

  • Granuloma faciale (GF) is an uncommon cutaneous disease of uncertain etiology that predominantly affects the face. Extrafacial lesions are rare.[mayoclinic.pure.elsevier.com]
  • Etiology and Pathophysiology Etiology and pathogenesis are not clearly defined, but several hypotheses exist. Some cases are idiopathic.[unboundmedicine.com]
  • […] and Pathogenesis The etiology of granuloma faciale is unknown.[plasticsurgerykey.com]
  • Etiology is unknown. Early cases of granuloma faciale were reported as “eosinophilic granuloma” of the skin.[accessmedicine.mhmedical.com]

Epidemiology

  • OBJECTIVES: To improve our epidemiological, clinical and pathological knowledge on IFAG, to search for an infectious aetiology, and to assess therapeutic recommendations.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Epidemiology Primarily a disease of middle-aged white men with rare reports of GF in Japanese, blacks, and children Incidence/Prevalence Rare; precise incidence and prevalence are unknown.[unboundmedicine.com]
  • Epidemiology Early cases of granuloma faciale were reported as “eosinophilic granuloma” of the skin.[plasticsurgerykey.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Case Overview granuloma faciale Member Rated 0 Patient case no. 1546 Date added 16 April 2003 Patient details Age --Undetermined-- Localisation Head / face / cheek Primary Lesions Plaque / erythematous Pathophysiology reactive conditions / eosinophilic[dermquest.com]
  • Regarding the pathophysiology, our study rules out a primary infectious disease, and allows considering IFAG either as a granulomatous process appearing around an embryological residue or as a manifestation to include in the spectrum of granulomatous[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Etiology and Pathophysiology Etiology and pathogenesis are not clearly defined, but several hypotheses exist. Some cases are idiopathic.[unboundmedicine.com]
  • Understanding their pathophysiology is essential in differential diagnosis and appropriate management.[aestheticsjournal.com]

Prevention

  • How can Granuloma Faciale be Prevented? Currently, there are no known methods to prevent Granuloma Faciale occurrence. However, some of the risk factors may be recognized and controlled.[dovemed.com]
  • The characteristic appearance and location of the lesions in the absence of adenopathy and constitutional symptoms should make the clinical diagnosis straightforward and prevent unnecessary interventions.[escholarship.org]
  • We take the utmost care to prevent poor voice outcomes.[voicedoctorla.com]
  • Counselling the patient and adopting preventative measures such appropriate filler choice and prevention of infection should be part of every case of dermal filler injections.[aestheticsjournal.com]

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