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Familial Atrial Fibrillation 7

ATFB7


Presentation

  • Acronym ATFB7 Keywords Any medical or genetic information present in this entry is provided for research, educational and informational purposes only.[uniprot.org]
  • Many of these patients may present either a hereditary or a de novo genetic abnormality.[revespcardiol.org]
  • ] Last updated: 11/9/2015 The long-term outlook ( prognosis ) for a person with familial atrial fibrillation (AF) varies depending on the type of atrial fibrillation the person has, as well as whether another underlying heart condition or disease is present[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • At present, 8 genes are now recognized as a cause of sporadic or familial AFIB.[eplabdigest.com]
  • They are present in the membranes that surround all biological cells because their main function is to regulate the flow of ions across this membrane.[acris-antibodies.com]
Congestive Heart Failure
  • It can result in palpitations, syncope, thromboembolic stroke, and congestive heart failure. Acronym ATFB7 Keywords Any medical or genetic information present in this entry is provided for research, educational and informational purposes only.[uniprot.org]
  • It can result in palpitations, syncope, thromboembolic stroke, and congestive heart failure.[malacards.org]
  • It can be associated with palpitations, syncope, thromboembolic stroke, and congestive heart failure. Sequence similarities Belongs to the potassium channel family. A (Shaker) (TC 1.A.1.2) subfamily. Kv1.5/KCNA5 sub-subfamily.[abcam.com]
  • It can be associated with palpitations, syncope, thromboembolic stroke, and congestive heart failure. 配列類似性 Belongs to the potassium channel family. A (Shaker) (TC 1.A.1.2) subfamily. Kv1.5/KCNA5 sub-subfamily.[abcam.co.jp]
Italian
  • Association of rs2200733 at 4q25 with atrial flutter/fibrillation diseases in an Italian population. Heart 2008;94:1394–6. Crossref PubMed Shi L, Li C, Wang C, et al.[aerjournal.com]
Palpitations
  • It can result in palpitations, syncope, thromboembolic stroke, and congestive heart failure. Acronym ATFB7 Keywords Any medical or genetic information present in this entry is provided for research, educational and informational purposes only.[uniprot.org]
  • He complained of daily episodes of rapid, irregular palpitation. There was no radiographic or echographic evidence of structural myocardial abnormalities.[revespcardiol.org]
  • Signs and symptoms may include dizziness, chest pain, palpitations, shortness of breath, or fainting. Affected people also have an increased risk of stroke and sudden death.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • It can result in palpitations, syncope, thromboembolic stroke, and congestive heart failure.[malacards.org]

Treatment

  • […] available about treatment for atrial fibrillation in general.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • Treatment was continued with flecainide at a dose of 100 mg/12 h. During follow-up, multiple episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation were detected, and ablation of the pulmonary veins was indicated.[revespcardiol.org]
  • […] follow-up, rate versus rhythm control, antiarrhythmic drug therapy, catheter ablation, surgery, antithrombotic and anticoagulant therapy, left atrial appendage exclusion, management of patients with heart failure and structural heart disease, and novel treatment[books.google.com]
  • It is not in any way intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, treatment or care. Our staff consists of biologists and biochemists that are not trained to give medical advice .[uniprot.org]

Prognosis

  • Procedures may include cardioversion, catheter ablation, or maze surgery. [3] Last updated: 11/9/2015 The long-term outlook ( prognosis ) for a person with familial atrial fibrillation (AF) varies depending on the type of atrial fibrillation the person[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • An earlier onset and longer duration of AF might also promote a so‐called cardiomyopathy in some patients, which may worsen prognosis.[jaha.ahajournals.org]
  • Wiesfeld sabelle C. van Gelder Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia, is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. 1 , 2 The majority of patients have AF in association with underlying (cardiac) diseases. 3 In 15–30% of the patients[link.springer.com]
  • Characteristics and prognosis of lone atrial fibrillation. 30-year follow-up in the Framingham Study . JAMA 254 , 3449–3453 (1985). 7. Fox, C. S. , Parise, H. , D'Agostino, R. B. Sr , Lloyd-Jones, D. M. , Vasan, R. S. , Wang, T. J. et al .[nature.com]
  • Incidence, clinical implications and prognosis of atrial arrhythmias in Brugada syndrome. Eur Heart J 2004;25:879–84. Crossref PubMed Andreasen L, Nielsen JB, Darkner S, et al. Brugada syndrome risk loci seem protective against atrial fibrillation.[aerjournal.com]

Etiology

  • However, familial AF may help to identify the etiology for strokes, more likely to be caused by thromboembolism from AF.[jaha.ahajournals.org]
  • Gelder Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia, is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. 1 , 2 The majority of patients have AF in association with underlying (cardiac) diseases. 3 In 15–30% of the patients, however, a known etiology[link.springer.com]
  • […] often associated with structural heart diseases or systemic disorders, such as hypertension, coronary artery disease, heart failure, rheumatic heart disease, hyperthyroidism and cardiomyopathies. 5 However, in nearly 10–20% of cases, the underlying etiology[nature.com]

Epidemiology

  • This issue of Cardiology Clinics examines following facets of atrial fibrillation: epidemiology and societal impact, risk factors and genetics, mechanisms, diagnosis and follow-up, rate versus rhythm control, antiarrhythmic drug therapy, catheter ablation[books.google.com]
  • Epidemiologic studies previously confirmed the role of genetics in the development of the arrhythmia.[eplabdigest.com]
  • Epidemiology and natural history of atrial fibrillation: clinical implications . J. Am. Coll. Cardiol. 37 , 371–378 (2001). 4. Benjamin, E. J. , Wolf, P. A. , D'Agostino, R. B. , Silbershatz, H. , Kannel, W. B. & Levy, D.[nature.com]
  • […] genetics focused on familial forms of the arrhythmia and led to the identification of additional genetic mutations (discussed in more detail in the next section). 2–31 Around the same time as the first reports of causative mutations in AF pedigrees, epidemiological[aerjournal.com]
  • The Clinical Profile and Pathophysiology of Atrial Fibrillation Relationships Among Clinical Features, Epidemiology, and Mechanisms. Circ Res. 2014;114: 1453–1468. pmid:24763464 View Article PubMed/NCBI Google Scholar 4.[journals.plos.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • The multidimensional role of calcium in atrial fibrillation pathophysiology: mechanistic insights and therapeutic opportunities. Eur Heart J. 2012;33: 1870–1877. pmid:22507975 View Article PubMed/NCBI Google Scholar 39.[journals.plos.org]

Prevention

  • NHLBI is part of the National Institutes of Health and supports research, training, and education for the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, and blood diseases.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • Furthermore, it demonstrates that inhibition of this epigenetic repression sensitizes cancer cells to stress-induced death signals and prevents their hyper-proliferative phenotype.[deepblue.lib.umich.edu]
  • This may facilitate earlier arrhythmia detection and stroke prevention and rhythm control strategies. For more information, please visit: www.ottawaheart.ca[eplabdigest.com]
  • Contributes to the regulation of nerve signaling, and prevents neuronal hyperexcitability. Promotes expression of the pore-forming alpha subunits at the cell membrane, and thereby increases channel activity (By similarity).[string-db.org]
  • Prognostic utility of T-wave alternans in a real-world population of patients with left ventricular dysfunction: the PREVENT-SCD study. Clin Res Cardiol. 2012 Feb;101(2):89-99.[kyoto-u-cardio.jp]

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