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Foreign Body

Bodies Foreign


Presentation

  • Repeated ingestion of foreign objects presents a multidisciplinary endoscopic dilemma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Medical records were reviewed, and information including age at presentation, type of foreign body, side of presentation, length of time in place, signs and symptoms at presentation, management practices, and outcomes was recorded.[doi.org]
Lower Abdominal Pain
  • The patient was complaining of a foul-smelling vaginal discharge and lower abdominal pain. On vaginal examination, a hard and large foreign body was found. Examination under anesthesia was performed, and an aerosol cap was removed from her vagina.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Epigastric Pain
  • She has had vomiting and epigastric pain since then. The patient has a long history of similar behavior in the past.[web.archive.org]
Excoriation
  • Surrounding skin showed hyperpigmentation and excoriation. CT scan orbit was inconclusive. MRI orbit revealed a peripherally enhancing extraconal/conal collection in the left orbit with a central hypo intense structure suggestive of a foreign body.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Polyembolokoilamania
  • The present case represents a rare occurrence of polyembolokoilamania or insertion of a FB into any bodily orifice for sexual gratification. BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Dysphasia
  • PATIENT CONCERNS: A 55-year-old Chinese male was admitted to our hospital with a 10-day history chest and upper abdominal pain without dysphasia, cough or other symptoms.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Adnexal Mass
  • Subsequent computed tomography imaging of the pelvis revealed a vaginal foreign body, complex adnexal mass, and hydroureter.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Painful Erection
  • Presenting complaints in patients with a foreign body are urinary retention, dysuria, frequent urination, decreased urine volume, nocturia, hematuria, painful erection, as well as pain in the urethra and pelvis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Nocturia
  • Presenting complaints in patients with a foreign body are urinary retention, dysuria, frequent urination, decreased urine volume, nocturia, hematuria, painful erection, as well as pain in the urethra and pelvis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Urinary Incontinence
  • The patient developed urinary incontinence after removal of the foreign body. Subsequent work-up demonstrated the presence of a right ureterovaginal fistula. The patient underwent an abdominal ureteroneocystostomy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

  • Diagnostic Imaging Diagnostic imaging is an essential component of the workup to determine the presence, location, material, size, and number of OrbFBs.[aao.org]
  • […] from children spending more time indoors on rainy days, with greater opportunity to put a small toy in their ear or nose. [6] Differential Diagnosis Abrasions to ear canal Cerumen impaction Hematoma Otitis externa Tumor Tympanic membrane perforation Workup[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Point and Stanley Zaslau, Bedside Ultrasound in Workup of Self-Inserted Headset Cable into the Penile Urethra and Incidentally Discovered Intravesical Foreign Body, Case Reports in Emergency Medicine, 2013, (1), (2013). Aaron M. Potretzke, Kelvin S.[doi.org]
  • Imaging exams are helpful, with routine radiography being the preferred imaging modality for the initial workup. However, several types of soft tissue foreign bodies are not radiopaque and therefore remain undetected.[scielo.br]
Staphylococcus Aureus
  • One hundred ninety-six staphylococci isolates (coagulase negative staphylococci and Staphylococcus aureus) derived from foreign body associated infections were tested towards susceptibility to ceftobiprole, using a test strip assay and broth microdilution[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Staphylococcus aureus infection often causes boils to form around them.Tetanus prophylaxis may be appropriate. Foreign bodies in the peritoneum can include retained surgical instruments after abdominal surgery.[en.wikipedia.org]

Treatment

  • Rectal Foreign Object Treatment 1. Go to a Hospital Emergency Room Do not try to remove foreign object. A hospital emergency room is most likely to have appropriate tools for removal. Delay in treatment could lead to serious injury or infection. 2.[web.archive.org]
  • MAIN LESSONS: An appendiceal foreign body is very rare in infant and there are currently no treatment guidelines. We report 2 cases of appendiceal foreign body including infant who gave us difficult decisions.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • With increased awareness and advanced surgical techniques, the outcome and the prognosis for these potentially devastating injuries have substantially improved.[web.archive.org]
  • Open eye injury is one of the commonest ophthalmic emergencies, and when accompanied by intraorbital foreign bodies, the condition carries a poor prognosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Background Intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs) are rather variable in presentation, outcome, and prognosis.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Etiology

  • Heavy, prolonged menstrual bleeding is common in adolescents and results from a variety of etiologies.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Pathology Etiology There are many ways in which a foreign body can be introduced into various parts of the human body.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Given the shared traumatic etiology, a corneal foreign body injury may seem like a likely source for RCE to develop from. The reality, however, is that foreign bodies rarely cause this condition.[reviewofoptometry.com]
  • MRI is impractical for routine foreign body detection in the ED but should be considered in cases of longstanding wounds or focal infections with unknown etiology in which the presence of a foreign body is being considered. [51, 52] Ultrasonography The[emedicine.medscape.com]

Epidemiology

  • This study aimed to analyze the current epidemiology of in-hospital or out of hospital treated foreign object injuries and suspected foreign body injuries in children.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Common removal methods include use of forceps, water irrigation, and suction catheter. [ 1 ] Epidemiology Foreign bodies of the ear are relatively common.[patient.info]
  • In addition to the initial damage caused at the time of impact, the risk of endophthalmitis and subsequent scarring (eg, PVR) play an important role in the planning of the surgical intervention. [3] Epidemiology Frequency United States According to the[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Epidemiology Most common in children, psychiatric patients and jail inmates IV. History Object swallowed How long ago was the ingestion V.[fpnotebook.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Pathophysiology The final resting place of and damage caused by an IOFB depend on several factors, including the size, the shape, and the momentum of the object at the time of impact, as well as the site of ocular penetration.[web.archive.org]
  • Because the respiratory tract does not participate in gas exchange, its total volume of the tidal volume is referred to as dead space. 5 Pathophysiological notes After the gastrointestinal tract, the respiratory tract has the highest germ count.[flexikon.doccheck.com]
  • Pathophysiology The final resting place of and damage caused by an IOFB depend on several factors, including the size, the shape, and the momentum of the object at the time of impact, as well as the site of ocular penetration. [1, 2] IOFBs transversing[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Essential Treatment Considerations The pathophysiology and management of a foreign body wound is dependent upon the material that has punctured the foot, the location, depth and time of presentation, footwear and underlying medical conditions of the patient[podiatrytoday.com]

Prevention

  • In order to prevent such iatrogenic injuries, which could have fatal consequences, the hospital staff must give particular care in the handling of sharp FBs.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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