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Fungicide Poisoning

Poisoning by Fungicides with Undetermined Intent


Presentation

  • Abstract Background: Reproductive tract infections (RTIs) and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) present a huge burden of disease amongst youth in India (approx. 6%).[iapsmupuk.org]
  • Historically, fungicide poisoning in the U.S. was far more common than at the present time.[experttoxicologist.com]
  • The objective was to evaluate whether combustion/pyrolysis cannabis treated with myclobutanil presented any safety concerns.[coloradogreenlab.com]
  • Copper sulfate also presents health hazards to humans and larger animals since its actions are not specific to just fungi.[geneticliteracyproject.org]
  • Natural products with antimicrobial activity do not appear to be present.” ( source , emphasis mine) What About Organic Grapefruit Seed Extract? Even “pure organic” grapefruit seed extract contains roughly 60% diphenol hydroxybenzene.[mommypotamus.com]
Gastric Lavage
  • "Activated charcoal, emesis, and gastric lavage in aspirin overdose" . BMJ . 296 (6635): 1507. doi : 10.1136/bmj.296.6635.1507 . PMC 2546073 . PMID 2898963 . Saetta, J. P.; March, S.; Gaunt, M. E.; Quinton, D. N. (1991).[en.wikipedia.org]
Disability
  • No residual disability is detected, and time lost from work or normal activities usually does not exceed 5 days. Low-severity illness or injury includes illnesses manifested by skin, eye, or upper respiratory irritation.[cdc.gov]
Low Fever
  • Chronic headaches, dizzi- ness, stomach- aches, salivation, low fever, garlic breath Coumarins, Indandiones, and other Anti-coagulants warfarin C Prevents blood from clotting Reaction if low accidental dose ingested Sodium Fluoroacetate Compound 1080[psep.cce.cornell.edu]
Red Eye
  • Three patients had nausea, and one patient each had pruritis, skin redness, eye pain, weakness, headache, dizziness, and chest pain.[cdc.gov]
Fear
  • Hightower puts the pieces together, she discovers questionable connections between ostensibly objective researchers and industries that fear regulation and bad press.[books.google.com]
  • The fear about poisoning is not unfounded even with the regulatory and medical advances these days. Many household goods that previously had the potential to be dangerous poisons have been made safer.[healthhype.com]
Aggressive Behavior
  • Chronic exposure symptoms can include vomiting, diarrhea, confusion and bizarre or aggressive behavior. Ingestion of large amounts can produce severe metabolic acidosis.[experttoxicologist.com]
Burning Sensation
  • Symptoms of long-term exposure include: Anemia (low red blood cell count) Burning sensation Chills Convulsions Diarrhea (often bloody and may be blue in color) Fever Liver failure, kidney failure Metallic taste in the mouth Muscle aches Nausea Pain Shock[medlineplus.gov]
  • Injure liver, kidney, and nervous system Prompt vomit- ing, burning sensation in stomach, dia- rrhea, muscle twitching Moderately irritating to eyes, skin, and lungs Do not remain in body; passed out within hours or days Paraquat and Diquat Herbicides[psep.cce.cornell.edu]
Chorea
  • This report adds one more compound to the increasing list of toxic chorea. [ FULL TEXT ] [ PDF ]*[jpgmonline.com]
Difficulty Concentrating
  • The woman was nauseated, tired, and had difficulty concentrating, but a litany of tests revealed no apparent cause. She was not alone. Dr.[books.google.com]

Workup

Fusarium
  • These include the vascular diseases Fusarium and Verticillium wilt (Figure 7). Diseases caused by other types of organisms, disorders caused by abiotic factors, and insect damage are not controlled by fungicides.[apsnet.org]

Treatment

  • Moderate-severity illness or injury consists of non--life-threatening health effects that generally are systemic and require medical treatment.[cdc.gov]
  • All patients received periods of treatment interspersed with lay periods; continuous treatment was suggested in future cases.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Each kind of poisoning needs a different kind of treatment. When pesticides get on the skin Most pesticide poisonings are from pesticides being absorbed through the skin.[en.hesperian.org]
  • In case of others- non-specifice Treatment given Atropine 0.05 mg/kg (repeated every 10-15 min) and then maintenance 0.02 to 0.05 mg/kg (at least 24 h) 2 - PAM (25-50 mg/kg) infused over 15-30 min as soon as possible (not later than 24 h).[indianpediatrics.net]
  • If spraying is necessary and the bees are at risk, move the bees out of the treatment area. In some cases, for example when Furadan is used at high rates, there appears to be no safe option but to remove the bees prior to treatment.[www1.agric.gov.ab.ca]

Etiology

  • Autism: The Diagnosis, Treatment, & Etiology of the Undeniable Epidemic . Sudbury, Mass: Jones & Bartlett Publishers. p. 156. ISBN 0-7637-5280-0 . Retrieved 24 July 2010 . a b c d e f g h i Skerfving SB, Copplestone JF (1976).[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Frequency, etiology and several sociodemographic characteristics of acute poisoning in children treated in the intensive care unit. Materia socio-medica. 2012;24(2):76–80.[bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com]

Epidemiology

  • Seite 69 - Epidemiology is defined as the study of the distribution and determinants of health-related states or events in specified populations, and the application of this study to control of health problems. ‎[books.google.com]
  • However, the epidemiological information about pesticide poisoning among children in China is limited.[bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com]
  • Epidemiologic evidence suggests exposed women may be at risk for miscarriages, reduced birth weight and infant malformations. Dinitrophenolic herbicides are nitroaromatic compounds which are highly toxic to humans and animals.[experttoxicologist.com]
  • […] exposure of the esophagus and oral area to the pesticide. [33] Urinary alkalinisation has been used in acute poisonings from chlorophenoxy herbicides (such as 2,4-D , MCPA , 2,4,5-T and mecoprop ); however, evidence to support its use is poor. [34] Epidemiology[en.wikipedia.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 89. Nelson LS. Copper. In: Hoffman RS, Howland MA, Lewin NA, Nelson LS, Goldfrank LR, eds.[medlineplus.gov]
  • […] exposure. [20] As mentioned before, long-term low-level exposure affects individuals from sources such as pesticide residues in food as well as contact with pesticide residues in the air, water, soil, sediment, food materials, plants and animals. [20] Pathophysiology[en.wikipedia.org]

Prevention

  • Prevention of Crops Contamination by Fungi and Mycotoxins Using Natural Substances Derived from Lycopersiconesculentum Mill. Leaves. Journal of Food Security . 2013; 1(2):16-26. doi: 10.12691/jfs-1-2-2.[sciepub.com]
  • The article offers ideas on preventing additional illnesses associated with pyraclostrobin exposure. Related Articles Pesticide Use and Self-Reported Symptoms of Acute Pesticide Poisoning among Aquatic Farmers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia.[connection.ebscohost.com]
  • This report describes those five events and provides recommendations for preventing additional illnesses associated with exposure to pyraclostrobin. Event A.[cdc.gov]
  • The technology to prevent bee kills exists, but cooperation between the farmer and beekeeper is necessary to prevent damage from pesticides.[www1.agric.gov.ab.ca]
  • Pesticide poisoning of children is mostly preventable if effective preventive strategies are employed. It is important to provide children with a safe environment.[bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com]

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