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Growth Retardation


Presentation

  • This mini review presents a personal view about the past, the present and the future of the relationship between growth retardation and the IGF system.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • All three patients presented with transitory metabolic acidosis in the neonatal period and development of persistent renal de Toni-Debré-Fanconi-type tubulopathy, with subsequent rachitis, short stature, microcephaly, sensorineural hearing impairment,[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Here we present the case of a girl with distal renal tubular acidosis who had visited multiple hospitals before the diagnosis was made.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In this report, we present a very rare entity of infantile systemic hyalinosis, which is a cause of protein-losing enteropathy and growth retardation in infancy, and review the relevant literature.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We describe a 3-year-old girl with pure 17q25.3 duplication and a complex clinical presentation comprising psychomotor/mental retardation, growth retardation and most dysmorphic features of partial duplication 17q syndrome with, additionally, a striking[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Atrial Septal Defect
  • The patient also presents with ventricular and atrial septal defects, hypoplastic mitral valve, persistent left superior vena cava, accessory spleen, and club foot.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Aniridia
  • We report on two siblings with an unusual constellation of congenital anomalies comprising 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD), congenital adrenal hypoplasia, aniridia, dysmorphic facial features, intrauterine growth retardation, and minor skeletal[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Alopecia
  • Growth retardation-alopecia-pseudoanodontia-optic atrophy (GAPO) syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] ID 230740) is one of the rarest autosomal recessive syndromes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Anterior Knee Pain
  • Osteochondrosis of the primary ossification centre of the patella (Köhler's disease) has been reported as a rare cause of anterior knee pain in children between 5 and 9 years of age. The aetiology remains unclear.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Involuntary Movements
  • We investigated a patient with intractable epilepsy, involuntary movements, microcephaly, and developmental and growth retardation.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

White Matter Lesions
  • We report on a patient with congenital distal limb contractures, characteristic face, prominent metopic sutures, narrow forehead, severe psychomotor and growth retardation, white matter lesions and failure to thrive.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • The test was positive, and the patient was started empirically on treatment to which he responded and ultimately recovered fully. Gastrectomy was not performed, and following treatment, the ulcer, anemia, and poor growth resolved.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Severe nutritional Cbl deficiency is an important nutritional disease where complications can be prevented with early treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We report a case of meningioma diagnosed 23 years after high-dose cranial and whole-body irradiation for the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Awareness of the fact that hypopituitarism may occur in this clinical setting is necessary for early diagnosis and treatment, especially among general care practitioners taking care of these patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • If despite these measures, growth suppression still occurs then treatment with medicines other than corticosteroids should be considered.[medsafe.govt.nz]

Prognosis

  • OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to investigate maternal serum and neonatal umbilical cord asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels in prediction of perinatal prognosis in pregnancies with preeclampsia (PE) and fetal intrauterine growth retardation[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Intracranial germinoma is a rare malignant tumour in childhood with an excellent prognosis under adequate therapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • IUGR Prognosis AAFP suggests that most infants with IUGR have a positive prognosis, with many catching up in growth within the first three months after birth.[birthinjuryguide.org]
  • In such cases, the prognosis is good Additional and Relevant Useful Information for Intrauterine Growth Retardation: There are about 200,000 cases of Intrauterine Growth Retardation in the United States annually.[dovemed.com]
  • Prognosis The prognosis is poor with half of infants dying during the first days of life and the other half not living past 4 months of age, mainly because of energy depletion.[orpha.net]

Etiology

  • We propose etiology and the term pyloric achalasia for this late-onset functional gastric outlet obstruction.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • So far no data suggest etiological impact of consanguinity, parental age, or environmental factors. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The etiology and perinatal behaviour in the two groups were also different. A single head: abdominal circumference ratio may be useful in differentiating between symmetrical and asymmetrical IUGR after 36 weeks.[link.springer.com]
  • A more specific threshold would be one oriented on the 5th percentile - however, a number of endangered infants would eventually be overlooked then. 3 Etiology Causes can be genetic or due to environmental factors.[flexikon.doccheck.com]
  • Etiology Many different factors cause IUGR, but they may be divided into two large categories, based on etiology. These categories include fetoplacental factors and maternal factors.[aafp.org]

Epidemiology

  • The aim of this review is to study the epidemiology, physiopathology and possible causes of IUGR. Also, it intends to study the possible role of the placenta as an IGF-1 target organ.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • ., infarction and abruption) Epidemiology risk factors asymmetric IUGR chronic hypertension pre-eclampsia chronic renal failure diabetes smoking symmetric intrauterine infections chromosomal abnormalities congenital anomalies Pathophysiology asymmetric[step2.medbullets.com]
  • Malin Hult, Niklas Darin, Ulrika Döbeln and Jan‐Eric Månsson, Epidemiology of lysosomal storage diseases in Sweden, Acta Paediatrica, 103, 12, (1258-1263), (2014). Bryan G.[dx.doi.org]
  • Discussion References Discussion Reversibility of stunting: Epidemiological findings in children from developing countries 1. Introduction 2. The timing of stunting 3. Age at menarche 4.[archive.unu.edu]
  • Summary Epidemiology The typical GRACILE syndrome (caused by the homozygous c.232A G mutation in the BCS1L gene) is prevalent in Finland, where it has an incidence of about 1/50,000 births. It has also rarely been found in Sweden and the U.K.[orpha.net]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • ., infarction and abruption) Epidemiology risk factors asymmetric IUGR chronic hypertension pre-eclampsia chronic renal failure diabetes smoking symmetric intrauterine infections chromosomal abnormalities congenital anomalies Pathophysiology asymmetric[step2.medbullets.com]
  • […] abnormalities chemical exposure constitutional small size However, there is an increasing sentiment that this classification may not be ideal, and that comparison of blood flow via ultrasound dopplers ( see below ) may provide more helpful return to top Pathophysiology[sharinginhealth.ca]
  • It has helped physicians understand the pathophysiology of IUGR with regard to diminished blood flow.[aafp.org]

Prevention

  • Severe nutritional Cbl deficiency is an important nutritional disease where complications can be prevented with early treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • IUGR Prevention Unfortunately, there is currently no known way that will prevent IUGR, but there are certain steps that you can to help reduce the risk, including: Eating healthy and taking appropriate prenatal vitamins Not smoking or partaking in drug[birthinjuryguide.org]
  • Therefore, a preventive management approach needs to be instituted in developing countries and this should begin with the first antenatal clinic visit.[ijponline.biomedcentral.com]

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