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Hyperesthetic Thalamic Pain Syndrome


Presentation

  • Improve your interpretation of presenting symptoms with 38 new topics and 40 new images in the Differential Diagnosis section, and optimize patient care with more than 250 new figures and tables.[books.google.com]
  • Each topic is presented in a concise, focused, and well-illustrated format featuring a description of the condition, discussion of symptoms, examination findings, functional limitations, and diagnostic testing.[books.google.de]
Pain
  • Clinical chapters define pain in conditions such as post-herpetic and post-traumatic neuralgias, plantar fasciitis, low back pain, post-surgical pain syndromes and migraine in detail, provide discussion of current modes of treatment and updated information[books.google.com]
  • Get a broader perspective on your field from new chapters on Labral Tears of the Shoulder and Hip, Pubalgia, Chondral Injuries, Central Post-Stroke Pain (Thalamic Pain Syndrome), Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy, Radiation Fibrosis Syndrome,[books.google.de]
  • G89.12 Acute post-thoracotomy pain G89.18 Other acute postprocedural pain G89.2 Chronic pain, not elsewhere classified G89.21 Chronic pain due to trauma G89.22 Chronic post-thoracotomy pain G89.28 Other chronic postprocedural pain G89.29 Other chronic[icd10data.com]
Disability
  • Practical, clinically relevant material facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal, pain, and chronic disabling conditions.[books.google.com]
  • Medical pain management indication to improve pain as patients continue their physical and occupational therapy medications nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) gabapentin bisphosphonates tricyclic antidepressants Complications Chronic pain Disability[medbullets.com]
  • […] syndrome Thalamic pain syndrome of Dejerine-Roussy Central pain ICD-9 Code 338.0 Central pain syndrome ICD-10 Code G89.0 Central pain syndrome Definition Central post-stroke pain (CPSP), formerly known as thalamic pain syndrome, is a chronic complex disabling[clinicalgate.com]
  • Patients can be completely disabled and CP may be so devastating as to override any other disability in the chronic stage.[assets.cambridge.org]
Surgical Procedure
  • According to the medical literature, a surgical procedure known as subparietal leucotomy/capsulotomy has the potential to eliminate pain associated with central pain syndrome.[rarediseases.org]
  • The first recorded surgical procedure for relief of central thalamic pain, a spinothalamic cordotomy, was performed by Frazier in 1937 ( Frazier et al 1937 ).[medlink.com]
  • This duality (nociception and suffering) is of practical importance for certain drugs or surgical procedures, such as cingulotomy, and may reduce the patient’s reaction to painful stimuli, leaving awareness of the sensation largely intact.[accessmedicine.mhmedical.com]
  • Investigational Therapies Surgical procedures to affect lesions may interrupt the sensory pathway from the brain and help decrease pain without affecting sensory ability.[flash.lymenet.org]
  • It also has high complication rates which are related to surgical procedures such as infections, equipment failures, local pain in the implantation site and the need of replacement of its components [ 24 - 26 ].[jneuro.com]
Fatigue
  • Glean the latest information on hot topics in the field such as cancer-related fatigue, polytrauma, and traumatic brain injury Efficiently and expertly implement new ICD-10 codes in a busy outpatient setting.[books.google.com]
  • Chronic Pain Connection - HealthCentral Learn about the symptoms, treatment, and medications of chronic pain conditions like Fibromyalgia, Back Pain, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, TMJ Disorder, and Foot Pain View More...[samhea.com]
  • Large fiber Pin loss: Distal; Most patients Vibration: Commonly (50%) reduced Sensory ataxia: Increased falling in some patients Pain: Some patients Distal Proximal: May be prominent in proximal regions Paresthesia Burning Increased at night Motor: Fatigue[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]
  • "A terrible fatigue in my muscles, "A feeling of drawing, pulling, crushing." Hyperpathia: Heightened response to a noxious stimulus. Allodynia: Pain from a very mild stimulus. Can also describe referred pain.[caring.com]
Limb Pain
  • .-) back pain (M54.9) breast pain (N64.4) chest pain (R07.1-R07.9) ear pain (H92.0-) eye pain (H57.1) headache (R51) joint pain (M25.5-) limb pain (M79.6-) lumbar region pain (M54.5) pelvic and perineal pain (R10.2) shoulder pain (M25.51-) spine pain[codelay.com]
  • .-) back pain ( M54.9 ) breast pain ( N64.4 ) chest pain ( R07.1 - R07.9 ) ear pain ( H92.0 -) eye pain ( H57.1 ) headache ( R51 ) joint pain ( M25.5 -) limb pain ( M79.6 -) lumbar region pain ( M54.5 ) painful urination ( R30.9 ) pelvic and perineal[icd10coded.com]
  • Mononeuropathy: one nerve Mononueropathy multiplex: several nerves Polyneuropathy: in symmetric bilateral nerves Abnormal CNS activity Phantom limb, pain from spinal cord injury, post-stroke pain Pain perceived at a site other than the site of tissue[quizlet.com]
  • Phantom limb pain is a category in itself and is described separately.[medlink.com]
  • Constant or intermittent burning, aching, or lancinating limb pain due to generalized or focal diseases of peripheral nerves. Pain referred to a surgically removed limb or portion thereof.[brainscape.com]
Cough
Failure to Thrive
  • Fred Ferri’s popular "5 books in 1" format provides quick guidance on menorrhagia, Failure to Thrive (FTT), Cogan’s syndrome, and much more.[books.google.de]
Musculoskeletal Pain
  • Practical, clinically relevant material facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal, pain, and chronic disabling conditions.[books.google.com]
  • Lin WC, Shen CC, Tsai SJ, Yang AC Does Conservative Treatment Change the Brain in Patients with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain? A Systematic Review. Kregel J, Coppieters I, DePauw R, Malfliet A, Danneels L, Nijs J, Cagnie B, Meeus M[medicbind.com]
  • In particular, musculoskeletal pain is prevalent in PSP patients [ 13 ], being probably secondary to decreased muscle strength and altered descending modulatory system tonus [ 14 ].[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com]
  • J Musculoskeletal Pain. 1996. 4:145-62. Mersky H, Bogduk N. Classification of chronic pain. Seattle: IASP Press. 1994. Ochoa JL. Truths, errors, and lies around "reflex sympathetic dystrophy" and "complex regional pain syndrome".[emedicine.medscape.com]
Low Back Pain
  • Clinical chapters define pain in conditions such as post-herpetic and post-traumatic neuralgias, plantar fasciitis, low back pain, post-surgical pain syndromes and migraine in detail, provide discussion of current modes of treatment and updated information[books.google.com]
  • Maignes syndrome is low back pain that radiates into … Maignes syndrome comes from thoraco lumbar region to the side of thigh and groin too. View More... Complex regional pain syndrome - Symptoms and … Causes.[samhea.com]
  • Spasticity also can cause low back pain and result in feelings of pain or tightness in and around joints. What Is the Outlook for People With Spasticity? The outlook varies per person.[webmd.com]
  • Anatomy, biochemistry, and physiology of low back pain, in White Spine Care: diagnosis and conservative treatment. St. Louis: Mosby Press; 1995. pp 84-103. Wheeler AH, Murrey DB. Spinal pain: pathogenesis, evolutionary mechanisms and management.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Hemianopsia
  • Description of a case of bleeding in the nucleus externus thalami optici and in the pulvinar, whose essential symptom consisted in hyperesthesia and terrible pains in the contralateral side, besides hemiathetosis and hemianopsia), he remarked how only[assets.cambridge.org]
  • Major neurologic deficits were motor pyramidal motor syndrome in 17 (42.5%), cranial nerves deficits in 6 (15.0%) cerebellar syndrome in 5 (12.5%), choreoatetosic movements in 3 (7.5%), sensory ataxia in two (5.0%) and hemianopsia in one (2.5%) patient[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com]
Hemianopsia
  • Description of a case of bleeding in the nucleus externus thalami optici and in the pulvinar, whose essential symptom consisted in hyperesthesia and terrible pains in the contralateral side, besides hemiathetosis and hemianopsia), he remarked how only[assets.cambridge.org]
  • Major neurologic deficits were motor pyramidal motor syndrome in 17 (42.5%), cranial nerves deficits in 6 (15.0%) cerebellar syndrome in 5 (12.5%), choreoatetosic movements in 3 (7.5%), sensory ataxia in two (5.0%) and hemianopsia in one (2.5%) patient[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com]
Suggestibility
  • Access full-color images and more than 90 online-only topics at Expert Consult, as well as EBMs, Suggested Reading, Patient Teaching Guides, and additional algorithms.[books.google.com]
  • Access full-color images and 65 online-only topics at Expert Consult, as well as online-only contents including EBMs, Suggested Reading, Patient Teaching Guides, and additional algorithms.[books.google.de]
  • The clinical guideline on Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome (IC/BPS) provides a framework for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with symptoms suggestive of this condition, including discussion of first through sixth line treatments and[samhea.com]
  • A friend suggested The Facial Pain Association for support.[givenmeathorn.blogspot.com]
Decreased Libido
Thalamic Pain
  • Get a broader perspective on your field from new chapters on Labral Tears of the Shoulder and Hip, Pubalgia, Chondral Injuries, Central Post-Stroke Pain (Thalamic Pain Syndrome), Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy, Radiation Fibrosis Syndrome,[books.google.com]
  • Applicable To Déjérine-Roussy syndrome Myelopathic pain syndrome Thalamic pain syndrome (hyperesthetic) The following code(s) above G89.0 contain annotation back-references Annotation Back-References In this context, annotation back-references refer to[icd10data.com]
  • Altschuler, MD, PhD Synonyms Central post-stroke pain Thalamic pain syndrome Thalamic pain syndrome of Dejerine-Roussy Central pain ICD-9 Code 338.0 Central pain syndrome ICD-10 Code G89.0 Central pain syndrome Definition Central post-stroke pain (CPSP[clinicalgate.com]
  • Thalamic pain syndrome (hyperesthetic) ICD-9-CM Volume 2 Index entries containing back-references to 338.0 :[icd9data.com]
Hyperesthesia
  • Hyperesthesia Symptoms As aforementioned, in cutaneous hyperesthesia, the skin reacts overtly to any type of stimuli causing an increase in pain and tenderness.[patienthelp.org]
  • Current Knowledge The most common cause of hyperesthesia is peripheral neuropathy, such as might occur with diabetes or chronic alcohol abuse.[link.springer.com]
  • This case is thus especially convincing evidence for the existence of “central pains,” as the hyperesthesia and the pains showed immediately after the insult and months before a later arising hemichorea). The patient was “ Frau R .” (Mrs.[assets.cambridge.org]
  • Hyperesthesia Hyperalgesia Allodynia Increased sensitivity to stimulation; this excludes the special senses. Hyperesthesia is a sensation out of proportion to the stimuli applied. Hyperesthesia is further divided into hyperalgesia and allodynia.[brainscape.com]
  • Physical findings in patients with CPSP may include mild or more severe hemiplegia, hyperesthesia, or hypoesthesia.[clinicalgate.com]
Hyperalgesia
  • Hyperalgesia is severe pain in response to mild noxious stimuli, such as a pinprick. Hyperesthesia Hyperalgesia Allodynia Increased sensitivity to stimulation; this excludes the special senses.[brainscape.com]
  • […] in anesthetic skin Laboratory HLA-DQ1 association: 69% vs 42% in controls Quantitative sensory testing: Patients with sympathetic maintained pain Warm thresholds: Increased Hyperalgesia to painful cold stimuli X-ray: Osteoporosis Patchy Time: After 4[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]
  • Hyperalgesia is when a normally painful stimulus becomes much more painful than would normally occur. These are thought to involve both the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS).[omegapainclinic.com]
  • These stimuli are especially useful to evaluate positive signals, such as allodynia and hyperalgesia.[healthdocbox.com]
  • ., hyperalgesia and allodynia functional motor impairments trophic changes e.g., increased hair growth in the affected region and skin atrophy Imaging Radiography indication can be used in the workup of patients with CRPS findings patchy osteoporosis[medbullets.com]
Dystonia
  • Stay current with expanded and updated coverage of diagnosis, management and rehabilitation of Cervical Dystonia, Suprascapular Neuropathy, Epicondylitis, Temporomandibular Joint Pain, Spinal Cord Injury, Stroke, Adhesive Capsulitis of the Hip, and Adductor[books.google.com]
  • […] joint movement) Vasomotor: Temperature asymmetry and/or skin color changes and/or asymmetry Sudomotor/Edema: Edema and/or sweating changes and/or sweating asymmetry Motor/Tropic: Decreased range of motion and/or motor dysfunction (weakness, tremor, dystonia[omegapainclinic.com]
  • Van Rooijen DE, Roelen DL, Verduijn W (2012) Genetic HLA associations in complex regional pain syndrome with and without dystonia. J Pain 13: 784-789.[jneuro.com]
  • Multifocal or generalized tonic dystonia complex regional pain syndrome: a distinct clinical in entity associated with HLA-DR13. Ann Neurol. 2000. 48:113-116. Van De Beek WJ, Roep BO, Van Der Slik AR, et al.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Get a broader perspective on your field from new chapters on Labral Tears of the Shoulder and Hip, Pubalgia, Chondral Injuries, Central Post-Stroke Pain (Thalamic Pain Syndrome), Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy, Radiation Fibrosis Syndrome,[books.google.com]
  • This term is sometimes used only for pain due to peripheral neuropathy and excludes central pain because of the differences in clinical features and pathomechanisms.[medlink.com]
  • Current Knowledge The most common cause of hyperesthesia is peripheral neuropathy, such as might occur with diabetes or chronic alcohol abuse.[link.springer.com]
  • Another neurologic illness called peripheral neuropathy can completely damage the nerves of the peripheral nervous system either due to diabetes or trauma.[patienthelp.org]

Workup

  • ., increased hair growth in the affected region and skin atrophy Imaging Radiography indication can be used in the workup of patients with CRPS findings patchy osteoporosis Bone scintigraphy indication can be used in the workup of patients with CRPS findings[medbullets.com]
  • Workup should be performed by a neurologist and brain imaging to look for evidence of infarction or tumor should be obtained.[en.wikipedia.org]

Treatment

  • Botulinum Toxin Treatment of Pain Disorders will prove an invaluable resource for clinicians and researchers involved in the treatment of pain disorders including neurologists, pain medicine specialists, anesthesiologists, internists, those conducting[books.google.com]
  • Practical, clinically relevant material facilitates the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal, pain, and chronic disabling conditions.[books.google.de]
  • treatments that should not be offered.[samhea.com]

Prognosis

  • Neurology Articles (Diagnosis, Treatment, Prognosis ... Neurology articles covering symptoms, diagnosis, staging, treatment, prognosis, and follow-up. Peer reviewed and up-to-date recommendations written by leading experts. View More...[samhea.com]
  • (Outcomes/Resolutions) The prognosis of Thalamic Syndrome depends on the ‘pain severity’ experienced by the individual.[dovemed.com]
  • […] of age Etiology complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) typically occurs after a precipitating injury such as surgery soft tissue injury fracture Pathogenesis may involve both central and peripheral mechanisms; however, the exact mechanism is unclear Prognosis[medbullets.com]
  • The impact of MPS in pain treatment, prognosis and its role in rehabilitation of these patients remain to be determined.[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com]
  • […] rotated Nose: Angle pronounced, Large nose/bulbous tip, Prominent supraorbital ridge & bridge Lips: Full Eye Corneal opacity: Cornea verticillata Conjunctival & Retinal vessels: Tortuous Systemic, Other Episodic fever: 20 years Edema (50%) Hypothyroid Prognosis[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]

Etiology

  • Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology.[icd10coded.com]
  • Clinical definition abnormality of a body region that is characterized by pain and swelling vasomotor instability skin changes patchy bone demineralization impaired range of motion Epidemiology demographics more common in women and patients 30 years of age Etiology[medbullets.com]
  • (Etiology) The cause of Thalamic Syndrome is predominantly related to stroke in the region of the thalamus (a part of the brain).[dovemed.com]
  • Etiologic causes include anatomic lesions affecting the spinal nerve and dorsal root ganglion including herniated intervertebral disc and spinal stenosis.[brainscape.com]
  • , Sensory or Normal Pathology: Proximal & Distal axon loss in skin Clinical syndrome: Non-length dependent Small fiber polyneuropathy (SFPN) 18 Age Range: 19 to 72 years Mean 46 years Epidemiology vs Length dependent SFPN Younger Females more common Etiologies[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]

Epidemiology

  • Related to Disuse of muscle Metabolic syndrome Pathology Skin biopsy: Reduced epidermal axon density Nerve biopsy Reduced numbers of small & large axons Inflammation: Epineurial vessels in some patients with severe pain & absent SNAPs 10 Epidemiology[neuromuscular.wustl.edu]
  • Introduction Clinical definition abnormality of a body region that is characterized by pain and swelling vasomotor instability skin changes patchy bone demineralization impaired range of motion Epidemiology demographics more common in women and patients[medbullets.com]
  • D. (2002) Taxonomy and epidemiology of spinal cord injury pain. In: Yezierski, R.P. and Burchiel, K. (eds.)[shiga-med.ac.jp]
  • View Article PubMed Google Scholar Gerwin RD: Classification, epidemiology, and natural history of myofascial pain syndrome. Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2001, 5: 412-420. 10.1007/s11916-001-0052-8.[bmcneurol.biomedcentral.com]
  • In particular, it is our contention that an explanation and a cure for this “enigma” can now be offered. 2 CENTRAL PAIN OF BRAIN ORIGIN EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL FEATURES 1.[assets.cambridge.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Cambridge University Press, 2011/10/13 A fully updated new edition of this definitive, unrivalled, no-nonsense textbook, Central Pain Syndrome: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management provides new treatment guidelines that aid the reader in effective[books.google.com]
  • This clinical article discusses the pathophysiology of central neuropathic pain and its classification and differentiation from peripheral neuropathic pain.[medlink.com]
  • It was first described, with pathophysiologic correlation to a lesion in the thalamus, in 1906 by Dejerine and Roussy as a “severe persistent, paroxysmal, often intolerant pain on the hemiplegic side, not yielding to analgesic treatment” [ 1 ].[clinicalgate.com]
  • Cambridge University Press 978-0-521-86692-7 - Central Pain Syndrome: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis and Management - by Sergio Canavero and Vincenzo Bonicalzi Excerpt 1 INTRODUCTION “Frau R. Suicidium.”[assets.cambridge.org]
  • ] Although debatable, these symptoms are rare and considered part of a "thalamic phenomenon", and are not normally considered a characteristic of Dejerine–Roussy syndrome. [ medical citation needed ] Causes and pathophysiology [ edit ] Although there[en.wikipedia.org]

Prevention

  • Rapidly find the answers you need with separate sections on diseases and disorders, differential diagnosis, clinical algorithms, laboratory results, and clinical preventive services, plus an at-a-glance format that uses cross-references, outlines, bullets[books.google.de]

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