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Hypertrichosis


Presentation

  • Abstract Hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita is a rare, autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder with sporadic presentations reported.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract Abstract: Hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita is a rare, autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder with sporadic presentations reported.[doi.org]
Conjunctival Hyperemia
  • Common local side effects are conjunctival hyperemia, iris pigmentation, and hypertrichosis of the eyelashes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Hypertrichosis
  • For example, terminology has included hypertrichosis universalis, hypertrichosis lanuginosa, congenital hypertrhicosis lanuginosa, and hypertrichosis universalis lanuginosa.[dermatology.cdlib.org]
  • Hypertrichosis is categorized as congenital or acquired, and regional or generalized. Methods of managing hypertrichosis are also briefly reviewed[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Mallory, Hypertrichosis, Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 48, 2, (161), (2003). R.[doi.org]
Hirsutism
  • , hypertrichosis excessive hairiness; hirsutism.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Hirsutism may be a manifestation of many systemic diseases. Treatment of hirsutism comprises pharmacological and mechanical methods.[termedia.pl]
  • Hirsutism, which is male-pattern hair growth in a female or child, is not included in this review. Hypertrichosis is categorized as congenital or acquired, and regional or generalized. Methods of managing hypertrichosis are also briefly reviewed[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In hirsutism (male pattern hair growth in a female or child), the hair is of the adult type—thick, coarse, pigmented, and medullated.[jco.ascopubs.org]

Workup

  • Workup of Hirsutism History Age of onset : Hirsutism, which is noticed from puberty, is indicative of idiopathic hirsutism. Hirsutism starting at middle/older age is indicative of adrenal or ovarian tumors.[lecturio.com]
HLA-B27
  • Abstract We present a 37 year-old man with HLA-B27 positive ankylosing spondylitis for the last 3 years. Interestingly, he developed both alopecia areata and hypertrichosis simultaneously following infliximab treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • Summary Generalized hypertrichosis is a common side‐effect of oral minoxidil treatment for hypertension.[doi.org]
  • The authors present a case of a patient who developed marked hypertrichosis of the cheek vellus 3 months after starting treatment with travoprost.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • What is the treatment for acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa? The main goal of treatment is to treat the underlying cancer.[dermnetnz.org]

Prognosis

  • […] lichen planus lotion lupus lymph-nodes majority of instances malady mercury nails nodules occasionally occur ointment oval papilla papillary papular papules particularly patches patient pediculosis pemphigus percent Phila pigmentation present probably Prognosis[books.google.com]
  • Because acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa typically occurs late in the course of the malignancy, the overall prognosis is poor. However, regression of hair growth is known to occur if the tumour is treated or removed.[dermnetnz.org]
  • Management and prognosis The current literature focuses predominantly on diagnosis of AS cases rather than management. The first described patient, Petrus Gonzales, lived a long life and was able to procreate [ 1 ].[dermatology.cdlib.org]

Etiology

  • —The dilated disease disorder eczema employed epidermis eruption erythema Etiology Etiology and Pathology.[books.google.com]
  • Despite an attempt to find etiologic factors in our patients and in the literature, none could be elicited.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology.[icd10coded.com]
  • Despite an attempt to find etiologic factors in our patients and in the literature, none could be elicited. Citing Literature Number of times cited according to CrossRef: 18 Clare A. Pipkin and Peter A.[doi.org]

Epidemiology

  • Descriptive epidemiology of Cornelia de Lange syndrome in Europe. Am J Med Genet A. 2008;146A:51-59. 5. Schaffer JV, Chang MW, Kovich OI, et al. Pigmented plexiform neurofibroma: distinction from a large congenital melanocytic nevus.[consultant360.com]
  • Epidemiology of Hirsutism Hirsutism affects around 10 % of women in the US. Hirsutism is one of the most common health problems of women in reproductive age. The prevalence ranges from 4.3 to 10.8 % in blacks and whites respectively.[lecturio.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Stimulation of the growth of hair via adrenal androgens by thyroid stimulating hormone may be the pathophysiological mechanism in our patient.[nature.com]
  • Aetiology and pathophysiology of hair loss. Dermatologica. 1987;175 Suppl 2:23-8. PubMed 11. Macias-Flores MA, Garcia-Cruz D, Rivera H, Escobar-Lujan M, Melendrez-Vega A, Rivas-Campos D, Rodriguez-Collazo F, Moreno-Arellano I, Cantu JM.[dermatology.cdlib.org]
  • (High Yield) Pathophysiology of Hirsutism Anatomy of Hair and Hair Cycle Hair follicles start to develop from epidermal cells at 8—10 weeks and stop at 22 weeks of gestation age.[lecturio.com]

Prevention

  • However, this often results in hypertrichosis that can be severe enough to prevent its use. Diazoxide blocks insulin release from the pancreas by opening the SUR1/Kir6.2 channels in ß-cells.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Hypertrichosis has no cure, and you can’t do anything to prevent the congenital form of the disease. The risk of certain forms of acquired hypertrichosis may be lowered by avoiding certain medications, such as minoxidil.[healthline.com]
  • Shaving the hair or using depilatories will only prevent a temporary solution as the hair will grow back. Bleaching products are also available which help make the hair less noticeable.[healthmaza.com]
  • Women should be warned not to expect improvement or at least 3–6 months after therapy is begun and lifelong therapy may be needed to prevent recurrence.[doi.org]

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