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Keloid

Keloidal Scar


Presentation

  • We are presenting here a case of histoid leprosy presenting with keloid like lesions, probably the rarest presentation of histoid leprosy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Therefore, the present study aimed to identify improved therapeutic approaches or drugs for the treatment of keloids.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • On presentation, she had a typical Cushingoid appearance and hypertension.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We present the follow-up of the Norwegian family. The entity resembles the Penttinen syndrome but can be differentiated due to the early aging in the latter, which is lacking in the presently reported entity.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In this case report, we present a 52-year-old man who presented with a nodule on his upper lip that mistakenly was diagnosed and treated as keloid.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Wound Infection
  • Important factors that promote hypertrophic scar/keloid development include mechanical forces on the wound, wound infection, and foreign body reactions.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Hypertrophic Scars Versus Keloids Clinical Characteristics Hypertrophic scarring usually occurs within 4 to 8 weeks following wound infection, wound closure with excess tension or other traumatic skin injury ( 7 ), has a rapid growth phase for up to 6[doi.org]
Localized Edema
  • Only mild local edema and epidermolysis, followed by a short reepithelialization period, were evident. During the 18-month follow-up period, there was no evidence of bleeding, infection, adverse effects, recurrence, or permanent depigmentation.[oadoi.org]
Hyperthermia
  • KEYWORDS: Collagen; Fibroblast; Hyperthermia; Keloid; Near-infrared; Water-filtered near-infrared[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Respiratory Insufficiency
  • Death occurred in the second decade in one of the patient due to restrictive respiratory insufficiency and cachexia. LMNA and ZMPSTE24 sequencing were normal. The molecular basis of the disorder remains unknown. Copyright 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Malocclusion
  • Premaxillary and maxillary retraction with pseudo-prognathism and palpebral malocclusion are characteristic. Thumbs and halluces are broad and spatulated. Linear growth is increased and intellectual functions are preserved.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Prognathism
  • Premaxillary and maxillary retraction with pseudo-prognathism and palpebral malocclusion are characteristic. Thumbs and halluces are broad and spatulated. Linear growth is increased and intellectual functions are preserved.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Corneal Opacity
  • Two male patients, 21 and 24 years old, with a history of corneal opacity for 5 and 17 years, respectively, with no history of an ocular trauma were studied.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • There is a significant reduction in keloid height after treatment in both groups, and significant differences are noticed between two groups after treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Although 5 years ago this treatment option might have been considered as a viable choice only atter all other methods failed, it is now generally recognized as an excellent first-line treatment option.[oadoi.org]
  • This algorithm could play a guiding role for surgeons when dealing with chest wall keloid treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • After a sequence of treatments, long-term follow-up is recommended.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • Early AMM diagnosis has a very significant effect on prognosis. For some persistent and growing proliferative lesions, obliterative treatments should be avoided before a definitive histopathological diagnosis has been made.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • What is the prognosis for keloids? Small keloids can be effectively treated using a variety of methods. Generally, a series of injections of steroids into the problem area is the simplest and safest approach.[medicinenet.com]
  • Identification of genetic markers in candidate genes such as the SMAD family may be of significant importance in diagnosis, prognosis and development of new therapies in the management of keloid scarring.[dx.doi.org]
  • Keloid could grow spontaneously or grow following dermal trauma with poor prognosis. The uncontrolled growth of keloid will continue to grow without regression, and the patients will experience itch, pruritis, and pain.[frontiersin.org]
  • Prognosis Keloids rarely resolve spontaneously; however, with treatment, they may become softer, less tender, less painful, and less pruritic. Following excision treatment alone, keloids frequently recur ( 50%).[emedicine.medscape.com]

Etiology

  • Keloid disease is a fibroproliferative dermal tumor with an unknown etiology that occurs after a skin injury in genetically susceptible individuals.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The etiology of keloids is unknown but they occur after dermal injury in genetically susceptible individuals, and they cause both physical and psychological distress for the affected individuals.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Although the process by which keloids develop is poorly understood, most theories of the etiology are referred to fibroblast dysfunction.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • However, additional study is needed to fully address the role of epigenetics in the etiology of keloid disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The etiology and formation pattern of heterotopic ossifications (HO) are still unknown. They occur in soft tissues in which bone does not normally form, near one or more proximal joints.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Epidemiology

  • The epidemiology of keloids in general is variable.[doi.org]
  • Indeed, there has never been a population study to assess the epidemiology of this disorder.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • The term ' chéloïde ' was coined by Alibert in 1806, from the Greek ' chele ', meaning crab's claw - to describe the lateral growth of tissue into unaffected skin. [ 1 ] Epidemiology [ 2, 3 ] Keloid scars are more common in people with darker skins, especially[patient.info]
  • The term ' chéloïde ' was coined by Alibert in 1806, from the Greek ' chele ', meaning crab's claw - to describe the lateral growth of tissue into unaffected skin. [ 1 ] Epidemiology [ 2 , 3 ] Keloid scars are more common in people with darker skins,[patient.info]
  • Table 1 Hypertrophic scars and keloids: epidemiological, clinical and histological differences.[doi.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as post-transcriptional gene repressors and participants in a diverse array of pathophysiological processes leading to skin disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Our study provides evidence for the role of PTB in keloid pathophysiology and offers a novel therapeutic target for keloids.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Several theories have attempted to explore the pathophysiology of keloid scar formation. A number of predisposing factors have been documented however none existed in this case.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Despite decades of research, the pathophysiology of keloids remains incompletely understood.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prevention

  • The aim of this study was to investigate effective topical agents for the prevention of recurrent keloid after surgical excision.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Several methods seem unsatisfactory for preventing keloid recurrence. The combination of surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy seems an excellent strategy to prevent recurrent disease.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Children may need up to 18 months of prevention. Imiquimod cream may help prevent keloids from forming after surgery. The cream may also prevent keloids from returning after they are removed. Keloid scar; Scar - keloid Habif TP. Benign skin tumors.[nlm.nih.gov]
  • MicroRNAs (miRs) have shown their potential as a novel therapy for the prevention and treatment of keloid. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a critical role in the regulation of scar development.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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