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Lumbar Plexus Neoplasm

Lumbar Plexus Neoplasms


Presentation

  • Jankovic is the recipient of many other honors including the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Movement Disorders Research Award, sponsored by the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, the Guthrie Family Humanitarian Award, presented by the Huntington’s Disease[books.google.com]
  • Mononeuropathies The presentation of CH in peripheral nerves presenting as mononeuropathies is rare. In some conditions also the term neuroleukemiosis has been suggested [ 21 ].[omicsonline.org]
  • In contrast to these monophasic presentations, other patients may present with a progressive course.[painspa.co.uk]
  • At presentation patients ranged in age from 19 to 71 years (mean 47 15 years), and neurofibromatosis was present in eight patients (32%).[dx.doi.org]
  • Uncommonly, prostate cancer can present as a lumbosacral plexopathy occurring through direct pelvic spread.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Pain
  • , and intraspinal morphine in At least as important as knowing when to fusion for cancer pain. operate is knowing when not to do so, and this Sometimes a procedure relieves pain but the is particularly true of the treatment of pain. pain recurs; it may[books.google.com]
  • Article / Publication Details First-Page Preview Abstract Options of Interventional Pain Therapy for Tumor Patients About 60-90% of patients with advanced tumor stages suffer from pain.[karger.com]
  • Although the pain characteristically persists for 1 to 2 weeks, as in idiopathic brachial plexitis, in some patients pain may become a disabling symptom, lasting many months.[painspa.co.uk]
  • However, pain relief has been noted to be transient. Such ablative procedures carry the risk of sensory and motor deficits. The mortality rate has been significant at 5%.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Neurology 43: 1678–1683 PubMed Google Scholar Goodmann R (1990) Surgical management of Pain. Neurosurg Clin N Am 1/3: 701–717 Google Scholar Goodman RR (1990) Surgical management of pain.[link.springer.com]
Swelling
  • ESSENTIALS OF ASSESSMENT History Patients will report dysesthesias, numbness, and swelling of the limb. 2,4,5,19,23 Pain is seen later in the course of the disease and is more frequent in brachial than in lumbosacral plexopathy. 26 Patients may report[now.aapmr.org]
Surgical Procedure
  • Abdominal hysterectomy is the surgical procedure that has been most frequently implicated.[painspa.co.uk]
Cough
  • Sneezing, coughing, laughing also provoke the onset of pain. After taking appropriate medications or after stifling attacks, the residual pain sensations pass to the lower back.[acikgunluk.net]
Low Back Pain
  • Massoud M, Del Bufalo F, CaterinaMusolino AM, Schingo PM, Gaspari S, et al. (2016) Myeloid Sarcoma Presenting as Low Back Pain in the Pediatric Emergency Department. J Emerg Med.[omicsonline.org]
  • Specificity of needle electromyography for lumbar radiculopathy in 55- to 79-yr-old subjects with low back pain and sciatica without stenosis. Am J Phys Med Rehabil . 2011;90(3):233–238. 15. Emami B, Lyman J, Brown A, et al.[dovepress.com]
Back Pain
  • Massoud M, Del Bufalo F, CaterinaMusolino AM, Schingo PM, Gaspari S, et al. (2016) Myeloid Sarcoma Presenting as Low Back Pain in the Pediatric Emergency Department. J Emerg Med.[omicsonline.org]
  • Specificity of needle electromyography for lumbar radiculopathy in 55- to 79-yr-old subjects with low back pain and sciatica without stenosis. Am J Phys Med Rehabil . 2011;90(3):233–238. 15. Emami B, Lyman J, Brown A, et al.[dovepress.com]
Spine Pain
  • Pain mainly when you sit or stand usually means that the tumor is causing weakness or instability in the bones of your spine. Pain primarily at night or in the early morning that gets better as you move is often the first symptom of a tumor.[mskcc.org]
Neuralgia
  • […] the The multiplicity of procedures with varying neurosurgeon may provide an important degrees of risks and benefits sometimes re contribution to the relief of intractable pain: quires a sequential approach, but always an trigeminal and other facial neuralgias[books.google.com]
  • […] elsewhere classified ( R00 - R94 ) Diseases of the nervous system G50-G59 2019 ICD-10-CM Range G50-G59 Nerve, nerve root and plexus disorders Type 1 Excludes current traumatic nerve, nerve root and plexus disorders - see Injury, nerve by body region neuralgia[icd10data.com]
  • In: Syllabus of the joint section on brain tumors of the CNS and AANS: 136–163 Google Scholar Pannullo SC, Michael H, Lavyne H (1996) Trigeminal neuralgia.[link.springer.com]
  • Occurring in this area, inflammatory processes are accompanied by neuralgia, which covers the lower half of the body. Often, there are pains.[acikgunluk.net]
  • Boleto G, Michel M, Salam N, Eschard JP , Salmon JH, et al. (2016) Low back pain and femoral neuralgia revealing myeloid sarcoma with megakaryocytic differentiation. Joint Bone Spine.[omicsonline.org]
Neuralgia
  • […] the The multiplicity of procedures with varying neurosurgeon may provide an important degrees of risks and benefits sometimes re contribution to the relief of intractable pain: quires a sequential approach, but always an trigeminal and other facial neuralgias[books.google.com]
  • […] elsewhere classified ( R00 - R94 ) Diseases of the nervous system G50-G59 2019 ICD-10-CM Range G50-G59 Nerve, nerve root and plexus disorders Type 1 Excludes current traumatic nerve, nerve root and plexus disorders - see Injury, nerve by body region neuralgia[icd10data.com]
  • In: Syllabus of the joint section on brain tumors of the CNS and AANS: 136–163 Google Scholar Pannullo SC, Michael H, Lavyne H (1996) Trigeminal neuralgia.[link.springer.com]
  • Occurring in this area, inflammatory processes are accompanied by neuralgia, which covers the lower half of the body. Often, there are pains.[acikgunluk.net]
  • Boleto G, Michel M, Salam N, Eschard JP , Salmon JH, et al. (2016) Low back pain and femoral neuralgia revealing myeloid sarcoma with megakaryocytic differentiation. Joint Bone Spine.[omicsonline.org]
Limb Weakness
Tremor
  • He is current or past member of numerous scientific and medical advisory boards of national foundations including the Worldwide Education and Awareness for Movement Disorders (WE MOVE), Dystonia Medical Research Foundation, International Tremor Foundation[books.google.com]
Dystonia
  • AAN) Movement Disorders Research Award, sponsored by the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation, the Guthrie Family Humanitarian Award, presented by the Huntington’s Disease Society of America, the Tourette Syndrome Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the Dystonia[books.google.com]

Workup

  • Careful workup, surgical technique, and attention to pathological diagnosis optimize management.[dx.doi.org]
  • Workup The clinical diagnosis of NLP is confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scanning of the affected areas.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Treatment

  • […] meant to be encyclopedic. noncancer pain, and intraspinal morphine in At least as important as knowing when to fusion for cancer pain. operate is knowing when not to do so, and this Sometimes a procedure relieves pain but the is particularly true of the treatment[books.google.com]
  • Washington University spinal neurosurgeons specialize in the treatment of complex brachial plexus tumors and/or spinal nerve root tumors.[neurosurgery.wustl.edu]
  • REHABILITATION MANAGEMENT AND TREATMENTS Available or current treatment guidelines There is no definitive treatment to arrest RIP progression or improve neurologic function.[now.aapmr.org]
  • We have rehabilitation and pain management experts ready to assist you after treatment. We can help you with the pain, numbness, weakness, and loss of mobility that may result from a spine tumor or its treatment.[mskcc.org]
  • Recurrence of CPC has to be judged incurable with conventional treatment, and is therefore an indication for experimental treatment. CPP treatment should be different.[nature.com]

Prognosis

  • ST-EPN-YAP1 : Predominantly childhood ependymomas with favorable prognosis, characterized by fusions of YAP1 .[neuropathology-web.org]
  • Treatment and prognosis It is an aggressive tumor that carries a poor prognosis, with 20-25% of patients developing metastases 8 .[radiopaedia.org]
  • The fact that prognosis of patients published prior to 1970 is unchanged to the prognosis in the most recent publications warrants the start of such an effort.[nature.com]
  • The prognosis of all melanotic scwannomas is not good with local recurrence or metastasis in over 40% of the cases.[ispub.com]
  • Although rare patients may be left with permanent weakness, the prognosis is excellent in most cases.[painspa.co.uk]

Etiology

  • The probable etiology of tumor spreading along prostatic nerves into the lumbosacral plexus (i.e., perineural spread) is discussed as are the potential mechanisms for this unusual mode of cancer dissemination.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • RIP presents most commonly with nonspecific neurologic changes that can include a combination of numbness, paresthesias, pain, and weakness. 1,2 Etiology and Pathophysiology Prior to the 1960s, nervous tissue was thought to be resistant to radiation damage[now.aapmr.org]
  • A detailed history was obtained, and neurological examination was done to exclude other potential etiologies of lumbosacral plexopathy, along with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).[dovepress.com]
  • The etiology of some choroid plexus tumours has been linked to SV40 infections ( Tabuchi et al, 1978a, 1978b ; Bergsagel et al, 1992 ; Lednicky et al, 1995 ; Martini et al, 1996 ), but it might also be influenced by other factors such as X-chromosome[nature.com]

Epidemiology

  • No Shinkei Geka 7 : 815–818 Janisch W, Staneczek W (1988) Epidemiology of tumors of the central nervous system–influence of the autopsy rate on the incidence rate.[nature.com]
  • Late fibroatrophic phase with retractile fibrosis. 4 Various potential contributors have been posited, including free radical damage and ischemia from fibroatrophic changes. 4 Epidemiology including risk factors and primary prevention Many cancer patients[now.aapmr.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • […] and pathophysiologic features.[painspa.co.uk]
  • Pathophysiology Neuroectodermal origin: The structure is similar to normal choroid plexus, and it is formed of epithelial cells.[ispn.guide]
  • Pathophysiology and management of radiation induced lumbosacral plexopathy. Turk Onkoloji Dergisi. 2008;23(3):147-152. Gosk J, Rutowski R, Reichert P, et al.[appliedradiationoncology.com]
  • RIP presents most commonly with nonspecific neurologic changes that can include a combination of numbness, paresthesias, pain, and weakness. 1,2 Etiology and Pathophysiology Prior to the 1960s, nervous tissue was thought to be resistant to radiation damage[now.aapmr.org]
  • Pathophysiology and management of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy. Turk Onkoloji Dergisi . 2008;23:147–152. 3. Saphner T, Gallion HH, Van Nagell JR, Kryscio R, Patchell RA. Neurologic complications of cervical cancer.[dovepress.com]

Prevention

  • Collaborative Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials of Antiplatelet Therapy for Prevention of Death, Myocardial Infarction, and Stroke in High Risk Patients. ‎[books.google.es]
  • As mentioned, neurological changes are usually irreversible, which underscores the importance of prevention.[appliedradiationoncology.com]
  • Although RIP occurrence has diminished with new treatment approaches, the evidence-based therapeutic options to prevent progression of RIP and manage symptoms is limited. REFERENCES Schierle C, Winograd JM.[now.aapmr.org]

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