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Malignant Neoplasm of Head and Neck

Head and Neck Cancer


Presentation

  • CASE REPORT A 56-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department with a 3-week history of a rapidly enlarging left supraclavicular neck mass.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Team-based approaches to the evaluation and management of older adults with different cancer types, including head and neck cancer, were presented.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Necrosis of the oral mucosa following head and neck cancer radiation therapy presents considerable clinical management challenges.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We present two cases of patients with a previous liver transplant in which cetuximab was administered to treat head and neck cancer.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Outcomes of re-irradiation with 42 Gy plus paclitaxel for secondary/recurrent SCCHN are herein presented. Two patients re-irradiated for secondary/recurrent SCCHN were evaluated.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Soft Tissue Mass
  • Restaging F-FDG PET examination demonstrated a soft tissue mass with intense hypermetabolism in the distal spinal cord and a hypermetabolic leptomeningeal metastatic deposit at the L3 level. The findings were confirmed on MRI prior to treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Anemia
  • Acute toxicities included grade 2 anemia and mucositis in both patients. Radiation dermatitis was grade 2 in one patient and grade 3 in the other.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Oral Ulcers
  • We report three cases of symptomatic persisting oral ulcerations where the addition of photobiomodulation therapy resulted in a rapid resolution of the oral lesions and in patient symptoms.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Dermatitis
  • Radiation dermatitis was grade 2 in one patient and grade 3 in the other. Re-irradiation with 42.0-44.4 Gy given twice daily plus paclitaxel was well tolerated and achieved a favorable response.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Bilateral Leg Weakness
  • A 63-year-old man presented with acute back pain and bilateral leg weakness 5 months after having a surgical treatment for moderately differentiated vocal cord squamous cell cancer (T2 N0 M0).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Neck Mass
  • CASE REPORT A 56-year-old male presented to the Emergency Department with a 3-week history of a rapidly enlarging left supraclavicular neck mass.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Suggestibility
  • These cases suggest that photobiomodulation may represent an adjunct to care of these difficult to manage complications in oncology.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Our experience suggests that endoDCR procedures can be effective in patients with NLDO following prior sinonasal XRT for head and neck neoplasms.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • Therefore, we collected whole blood and saliva samples from eight head and neck cancer patients before the start of radiation treatment, at mid-treatment and after treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Three months later, disease progression was once again noted with pembrolizumab treatment, which was subsequently discontinued.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor useful in the treatment of patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma combined with radiotherapy or chemotherapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] with head and neck cancer (HNC) who may have contact with children in the home setting are at risk of experiencing distress because of embarrassing and challenging oral symptoms often associated with an HNC diagnosis and the side effects of required treatments[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The use of such therapies has also been introduced into the treatment of other malignancies, including head and neck cancer.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • Saliva, a biological fluid, is a promising candidate for novel approaches to prognosis, clinical diagnosis, monitoring and management of patients with both oral and systemic diseases.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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