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Nasal Encephalocele


Presentation

  • OBJECTIVE: Nasal encephalocele may presents as a nasal mass, its treatment is surgical and it should be done early in life.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Nasal encephaloceles usually present at birth with symptoms of obstruction or other complications. It presents as an external swelling on the nose.[radiopaedia.org]
  • […] type, always present.[medsci.org]
Pathologist
  • […] interdisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of head and neck diseases, including the incidence, etiology, clinical presentation, pathology, differential diagnosis, and prognosis for each disorder-promoting clear communication between pathologists[books.google.de]
  • Perez-Atayde, MD, is Director of Special Techniques and Staff Pathologist at Boston Children's Hospital.[books.google.com]
  • “Nasal gliomas” and related brain heterotopias: a pathologist’s perspective. Pediatr Pathol 1986;5:353-62. 20 Fujioka M, Tasaki I, Nakayama R, Yakabe A, Baba H, Toda K, et al. Both nasal cerebral heterotopia and encephalocele in the same patient.[zdoc.site]
Dentist
  • […] general pathologists; otolaryngologists; oral, maxillofacial, plastic and reconstructive, general, head and neck, and orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons; oncologists; hematologists; ophthalmologists; radiologists; endocrinologists; dermatologists; dentists[books.google.de]
  • The ENT specialist must be aware of the fact that a dental origin is often overlooked by radiologists as well as by dentists so that a so-called inconspicuous dental or radiological examination cannot exclude dental genesis [691] , [692] , [693] .[egms.de]
Anemia
  • New chapters, expanded and updated coverage, increased worldwide perspectives, and many new contributors keep you current on the late preterm infant, the fetal origins of adult disease, neonatal anemia, genetic disorders, and more. "...a valuable reference[books.google.com]
Hunting
  • Hunt, Dr. Andrew G. Huvos, Dr. K. Thorsten Jäkel, Dr. Wei-Hua Jia, Dr. Newell W. Johnson, Dr. Gernot Jundt, Dr. Silloo B. Kapadia, Dr. Paul Kleihues, Dr. Sakari Knuutila, Dr. Hanna Strømme Koppang, Dr. Tseng-Tong Ku, Dr. Kimihide Kusafuka, Dr.[books.google.de]
Turkish
Cough
  • The swelling is usually soft, with normal overlying skin, and increases in size on coughing/straining. Symptomatic patients usually present with obstruction or rhinorrhea.[radiopaedia.org]
  • The swelling increases in size in response to coughing. Most common site is occipital and then frontal. Bilateral compression of the internal jugular vein also leads to the increase in the size of mass called as Frustenberg Test.[medicowesome.com]
  • CHAPTER 57 1163 Orthodontic Problems in Children 1183 Inflammatory Disease of the Mouth 1199 CHAPTER 62 1223 Otolaryngologic Manifestations of 1241 Diseases of the Salivary Glands 1251 Physiology of the Larynx Airways 1251 Congenital Malformations of tho Cough[books.google.de]
  • The swelling is usually soft, with normal overlying skin, and increases in size on crying/coughing/straining. In very few cases, small encephaloceles may initially go unnoticed and can remain undetected for years, even into adulthood.[azvent.com]
Macrostomia
  • Frontonasal dysplasia, macroblepharon, eyelid colobomas, ear anomalies, macrostomia, mental retardation, and CNS structural anomalies: Defining the phenotype. Clin Dysmorphol. 2001 ; 10 :81 -86 8.[medsci.org]
Aniridia
  • Aniridia, atypical iris defects, optic pit and the morning glory disc anomaly in a family. Ophthalmic Paediatr Genet. 1986 ; 7 :131 -35 16. Nucci P, Mets MB, Gabianelli EB. Trisomy 4q with morning glory disc anomaly.[medsci.org]
Facial Mass
  • Frontoethmoidal encephaloceles can be recognized as a facial mass covered with normal skin, while basal encephaloceles may cause nasal obstruction or symptoms related to herniation of basal structures.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Stroke
  • Smith, MD, is Director, Pediatric Cerebrovascular Surgery Co-Director, Neurosurgical Stroke Program Co-Director, Center for Head, Neck and Skull Base. Antonio R.[books.google.com]
  • Resources for Families and Individuals Affected by Encephalocele National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke External National Organization for Rare Disorders External References Parker SE, Mai CT, Canfield MA, Rickard R, Wang Y, Meyer RE,[cdc.gov]
  • The complication rates regarding mortality, stroke, blindness, or blood transfusion are considered as being rather low equally [783] .[egms.de]
Irritability
  • With minimal irritation to the nonsedated infant, we were able to assist with and assume ventilation.[anesthesiology.pubs.asahq.org]
  • Stenting-related complications (endonasal crusting, granulations, infection, lesion of the canaliculus or lacrimal punctum, irritation of the cornea, discomfort of the patient) can be avoided [958] .[egms.de]
Convulsions
  • Skin covering over the encephalocele may thin out and rupture, leading to exposure of brain, haemorrhage, CSF loss, meningitis, convulsions and even death. [4] The anaesthesiologists in such cases have to implement novel and safe ideas.[joacp.org]

Workup

  • Imaging studies in the diagnostic workup of neonatal nasal obstruction. J Comput Assist Tomogr. 2001;25(4):540.[shahfacialplastics.com]

Treatment

  • OBJECTIVE: Nasal encephalocele may presents as a nasal mass, its treatment is surgical and it should be done early in life.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Treatment Modalities 480 Conclusions 483 Conventional and Endoscopic Approaches to the Pituitary 485 Surgical Indications 486 Conventional Approaches to the Pituitary 487 Outcomes 489 References 490 Nasal and Paranasal Sinus Anatomy for the Endoscopic[books.google.com]
  • It also minimizes the level of exposure to ionising radiation Treatment and prognosis When a midline nasal swelling is present, no invasive procedures nor operations are performed until an intracranial connection has been excluded using CT scanning or[radiopaedia.org]

Prognosis

  • It also minimizes the level of exposure to ionising radiation Treatment and prognosis When a midline nasal swelling is present, no invasive procedures nor operations are performed until an intracranial connection has been excluded using CT scanning or[radiopaedia.org]
  • The prognosis appears to be better for patients with frontoethmoidal encephaloceles than for patients with occipital or parietal encephaloceles, and it depends largely on the presence of additional congenital anomalies of the brain.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] this highly lauded three-volume reference provides an interdisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of head and neck diseases, including the incidence, etiology, clinical presentation, pathology, differential diagnosis, and prognosis[books.google.de]

Etiology

  • Updated, reorganized, and revised throughout, this highly lauded three-volume reference provides an interdisciplinary approach to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of head and neck diseases, including the incidence, etiology, clinical presentation[books.google.de]
  • Up to now etiology remains unknown, although we conjecture that it is due to a mutation in TGIF gene.[medsci.org]
  • Base 660 General Principles of Endonasal Tumor Surgery 662 Postoperative Management 663 Outcome 664 References 665 Beyond the Sphenoid Sinus 669 Radiology 670 How to Do it 672 Pre and Postoperative Care 681 References 682 Congenital Choanal Atresia 684 Etiology[books.google.com]
  • Etiology and embryogenesis Theories abound to explain teratoma occurrence.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Epidemiology

  • Each entity is extensively discussed with information on clinicopathological, epidemiological, immunophenotypic and genetic aspects of these diseases. This book is in the series commonly referred to as the "Blue Book" series. Contributors: :Dr.[books.google.de]
  • Epidemiology of frontoethmoidal encephalomeningocoele in Burma. J Epidemiol Community Health. 1984; 38 :89–98. [ PMC free article ] [ PubMed ] [ Google Scholar ] 12. Bhagwati S, Mahapatra A. Pediatric Neurosurgery.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Recurrences or more correctly persistence may be seen in up to 30% of patients if not completely excised. [1] Epidemiology [ edit ] Nasal glial heterotopia is rare, while an encephalocele is uncommon.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Most registries and epidemiological studies classify encephaloceles using broad categories like frontal, parietal, occipital and sphenoidal.[rarediseases.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Currently it is unclear if it is a pathogenetic factor of the disease or mere a consequence [19] , [1294] , [1299] and which exact pathophysiological correlations exist [1291] .[egms.de]

Prevention

  • Wang Y, Liu G, Canfield MA, Mai CT, Gilboa SM, Meyer RE, Anderka M, Copeland GE, Kucik JE, Nembhard WN, Kirby RS; National Birth Defects Prevention Network.[cdc.gov]
  • Surgery is performed early in life to prevent progression of the process and prevent damage to the herniated tissue.[chop.edu]
  • Encephalocele Prevention Although the condition cannot be prevented completely, certain steps can be taken to decrease the chances of development.[hxbenefit.com]
  • Treatment and prognosis Once the diagnosis of a nasal glioma is established, early surgical resection is advocated to prevent local recurrence, nasal deformity, and secondary visual involvement 3 . Surgical resection is often curative 1 .[radiopaedia.org]
  • The authors emphasize the importance of preoperative assessment in order to prevent the intracranial complications. The authors report the case of 25 days-old girl with a mass on the dorsum and left wall of the nose, presented since birth.[jpss.eu]

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