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Nothnagel's Syndrome

Ocular Paralysis Cerebellar Ataxia Syndrome


Presentation

  • It is our ambition to present a complete survey of all medical phenomena named for a person, with a biography of that person. Disclaimer: Whonamedit? does not give medical advice.[whonamedit.com]
  • This reference guide will be the must-have of any internist or medical professional, as it takes a vast quantity of data across a sweeping grid of disorders, diseases, and presentations, and boils them down to individual parts, facilely indexed, and located[books.google.com]
  • Oculomotor nerve damage in this area can produce varied presentations.[eyewiki.aao.org]
  • Figure 2 Physical intraoral exam, presenting increase in volume of the tongue on the left side. Figure 3 Physical intraoral exam, presenting association of the depapillated area, with diminished tactile sensitivity.[scielo.br]
Developmental Delay
  • Defective glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier as a cause of persistent hypoglycorrhachia, seizures, and developmental delay. N. Engl. J. Med. ‎ Seite 130 - Stratakis CA. Carney JA, Lin JP, et al.[books.google.de]
  • Defective glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier as a cause of persistent hypoglycorrhachia, seizures, and developmental delay. N. Engl. J. Med. ‏ الصفحة 130 - Stratakis CA. Carney JA, Lin JP, et al.[books.google.com]
  • […] syndrome [医]郝-韦-普三氏综合征,着色斑性息肉消化道综合征 Hyperalimentation formula for short bowel syndrome [医]短肠综合征高营养配方 Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome [医]高免疫球蛋白E综合征 Hyperimmunoglobulin M syndrome [医]高免疫球蛋白M综合征 Hyperkalemic syndrome [医]高钾血综合征 Hyperkinetic syndrome with developmental[fastdict.net]
Asymptomatic
  • If asymptomatic ischemia did not carry prognostic significance comparable to the symp tomatic manifestations of ischemia, then the problem of silent ischemia would be very academic and without consequences for treatment.[books.google.com]
  • Morbidity and mortality from elective surgery for asymptomatic, unruptured, intracranial aneurysms. J Neurosurg. 1994 Dec;81(6):837-42. 10. Yanoff M, Duker J. Ophthalmology, 2 nd ed. Philadelphia: Mosby; 2004:1324-34.[reviewofoptometry.com]
Gangrene
  • […] acroparesthesia I73.89 ICD-10-CM Codes Adjacent To I73.89 I72.6 Aneurysm of vertebral artery I72.8 Aneurysm of other specified arteries I72.9 Aneurysm of unspecified site I73 Other peripheral vascular diseases I73.0 Raynaud's syndrome I73.00 …… without gangrene[icd10data.com]
Pallor
  • - A dictionary of medical eponyms Related people Carl Wilhelm Hermann Nothnagel A rare syndrome characterised by blanching of the skin, general pallor, and widespread vasoconstriction after exposure to cold.[whonamedit.com]
Anosmia
  • Seite 130 - The syndrome of anosmia with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: a genetic study of 18 new families and a review. Am J Med Genet 1983;15:417-435. ‎ Seite 121 - Jeffery DR, Mandler RN, Davis LE. Transverse myelitis.[books.google.de]
  • […] facial paralysis Pseudo-Gradenigo's syndrome -nasopharyngeal Ca, cerebellopontine angle tumor, petrous bone fx, basilar aneurysm, clivus chordoma -bilateral optic neuritis and transverse myelitis Pseudo Foster-Kennedy syndrome -frontal lobe mass -causes anosmia[brainscape.com]
Acrocyanosis
  • Convert to ICD-10-CM : 443.89 converts approximately to: 2015/16 ICD-10-CM I73.89 Other specified peripheral vascular diseases Approximate Synonyms Acquired portal-systemic shunt due to cirrhosis Acrocyanosis Acroparesthesia Acroparesthesia, vasomotor[icd9data.com]
  • Applicable To Acrocyanosis Erythrocyanosis Simple acroparesthesia [Schultze's type] Vasomotor acroparesthesia [Nothnagel's type] The following code(s) above I73.89 contain annotation back-references Annotation Back-References In this context, annotation[icd10data.com]
Short Arm
  • Analysis of 1 1 kindreds and linkage to the short arm of chromosome 2. J Clin Invest 1996:97: 699-705. ‎[books.google.de]
  • Analysis of 1 1 kindreds and linkage to the short arm of chromosome 2. J Clin Invest 1996:97: 699-705. ‏[books.google.com]
Behavior Disorder
  • Neuropsychiatric features, oculomotor dysfunction and sleep disturbances are also observed in MSA and include apathy, anxiety, depression, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and periodic limb movements in sleep.[orpha.net]
Ataxia
  • - A dictionary of medical eponyms Related people Carl Wilhelm Hermann Nothnagel Ipsilateral oculomotor palsy and contralateral cerebellar ataxia caused by a lesion affecting the oculomotor nucleus and the cerebellar peduncles.[whonamedit.com]
  • FSN, synonyms Type Case sensitivity Preferency Language Nothnagel syndrome Synonym sensitive acceptable GB English Nothnagel's syndrome Synonym sensitive preferred GB English Oculomotor paralysis-cerebellar ataxia syndrome Synonym initial insensitive[doctor.am]
  • Nothnagel's Syndrome mainly due to neoplasms ...affecting the Midbrain tectum involving Ipsilateral or bilateral CN 3 causes Oculomotor palsies; ataxia. We finish Alll the midbrain syndromes !!!!! Hope it helps! -Medha[medicowesome.com]
  • Claudes Syndrome Combination of features of benedicts and Nothnagel’s syndromes. 3rd N palsy with contralateral tremor and ataxia, no hemiparesis.[masterofmedicine.com]
  • Third Nerve Nothnagel’s syndrome: Ipsilateral third nerve palsy, plus ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia due to involvement of the superior cerebellar peduncle.[yumpu.com]
Cerebellar Ataxia
  • - A dictionary of medical eponyms Related people Carl Wilhelm Hermann Nothnagel Ipsilateral oculomotor palsy and contralateral cerebellar ataxia caused by a lesion affecting the oculomotor nucleus and the cerebellar peduncles.[whonamedit.com]
  • FSN, synonyms Type Case sensitivity Preferency Language Nothnagel syndrome Synonym sensitive acceptable GB English Nothnagel's syndrome Synonym sensitive preferred GB English Oculomotor paralysis-cerebellar ataxia syndrome Synonym initial insensitive[doctor.am]
  • "— Presentation transcript: 1 166-26 Claude’s Syndrome 2 Claude’s Syndrome Claude’s syndrome is a well-known midbrain syndrome characterized by ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral cerebellar ataxia.[slideplayer.com]
  • ataxia and tremor Red nucleus, corticospinal tract, brachium conjunctivum Oculomotor palsy, Vascular, contralateral tuberculoma, cerebellar ataxia, tumor corticospinal signs Superior Unilateral or cerebellar bilateral III peduncles Paralysis of upward[docshare.tips]
  • Third Nerve Nothnagel’s syndrome: Ipsilateral third nerve palsy, plus ipsilateral cerebellar ataxia due to involvement of the superior cerebellar peduncle.[yumpu.com]
Seizure
  • Defective glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier as a cause of persistent hypoglycorrhachia, seizures, and developmental delay. N. Engl. J. Med. ‎ Seite 130 - Stratakis CA. Carney JA, Lin JP, et al.[books.google.de]
  • Defective glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier as a cause of persistent hypoglycorrhachia, seizures, and developmental delay. N. Engl. J. Med. ‏ الصفحة 130 - Stratakis CA. Carney JA, Lin JP, et al.[books.google.com]
  • PYXIS - SALUTE SERVIZI TERRITORIO ;:93-95. 23 2009 Lennox-Gastaut syndrome with late-onset and prominent reflex seizures in trisomy 21 patients EPILEPSIA ;50:1587-1595. 24 2009 Myoclonic status in nonprogressive encephalopathies: An update EPILEPSIA ;[ricerca.cbim.it]
Reduced Consciousness
  • Acute subarachnoid bleeding typically causes severe headache and reduced consciousness. 7,8 The posterior communicating artery, located at the junction of the carotid artery within the Circle of Willis, is the most frequent location of aneurysms that[reviewofoptometry.com]

Workup

  • But, if it doesn’t, further workup should include MRI, a vasculitis workup and CSF examination to rule out infectious diseases or overproduction anomalies (e.g., pseudotumor cerebri, hydrocephalus, aqueductal stenosis, meningitis).[reviewofoptometry.com]
  • A thorough workup, including neuroimaging is essential to rule out anatomic lesions or other causes of this syndrome. Visually significant upgaze palsy can be relieved with bilateral inferior rectus recessions.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Nevertheless, basic workup must be done.[eyewiki.aao.org]
  • Antibody—negative Toxoplasma PCR—negative Varicella Zoster PCR—negative Urine Studies Histoplasma Antigen Assay—negative Imaging Studies MRI brain with contrast, MRA head with contrast CT chest/abdomen/pelvis with contrast Transesophageal Ultrasound The workup[eyerounds.org]

Treatment

  • If asymptomatic ischemia did not carry prognostic significance comparable to the symp tomatic manifestations of ischemia, then the problem of silent ischemia would be very academic and without consequences for treatment.[books.google.com]
  • Experience of the optic neuritis treatment trial. Neurology 1997:49:1404-1413. ‎[books.google.de]
  • Treatment of Bell’s Palsy – The Latest from emedhome.com Treatment of Bell’s palsy remains controversial and variable.[crashingpatient.com]
  • In such cases, it is necessary to assess the treatment priority for each impairment adequately.[jstage.jst.go.jp]
  • Treatment Because the Beta-D-Glucan Assay suggested that the lesion was a fungal abscess, empiric treatment with voriconazole and caspofungin was initiated.[eyerounds.org]

Prognosis

  • Therefore studies on prognosis of silent ischemia are of great importance, as their results should indicate how aggressively patients are to be managed.[books.google.com]
  • Prognosis is poor with a median survival of 6-9 years. The documents contained in this web site are presented for information purposes only.[orpha.net]
  • Causes and prognosis in 4,278 cases of paralysis of the oculomotor, trochlear, and abducens cranial nerves. Am J Ophthalmol . 1992 ; 113(5) : 489 –496.[aao.org]
  • Prognosis [ edit ] The eye findings of Parinaud's syndrome generally improve slowly over months, especially with resolution of the causative factor; continued resolution after the first 3–6 months of onset is uncommon.[en.wikipedia.org]
  • Prognosis and treatment The eye findings of Parinaud's Syndrome generally improve slowly over months, especially with resolution of the causative factor; continued resolution after the first 3–6 months of onset is uncommon.[ipfs.io]

Etiology

  • The most common known etiology is a posterior communicating artery aneurysm. This is a medical emergency.[eyewiki.aao.org]
  • Karger AG, Basel References Bogousslavsky J, Maeder P, Regli F, Meuli R: Pure midbrain infarction: clinical syndromes, MRI, and etiologic patterns.[karger.com]
  • . • Small vessel disease is the prime etiology in thalamic infarcts. • The etiology of midbrain infarcts remains undetermined in up to 50% of cases.[medlink.com]
  • Etiology Etiology of MSA is unknown but presence of cytoplasmic aggregates of α-synuclein, primarily in oligodendroglia, in combination with neurodegeneration in striatonigral and olivopontocerebellar structures are the pathological hallmark features.[orpha.net]

Epidemiology

  • Summary Epidemiology Prevalence ranges from 1/50,000-1/20,000. MSA-parkinsonian type (MSA-p) predominates in the Western Hemisphere and MSA-cerebellar type (MSA-c) predominates in the Eastern Hemisphere. Genders are equally distributed.[orpha.net]
  • Diagnosis: Third Nerve Palsy with Contralateral Hemiplegia Secondary to Midbrain Fungal Abscess Epidemiology of a midbrain fungal abscess Immunocompromised Individuals Use of chronic immunomodulators Stem cell transplant Solid organ transplant Leukemia[eyerounds.org]
  • View Article Google Scholar Papapanou PN: Epidemiology of periodontal diseases: an update. J Int Acad Periodontol. 1999, 1: 110-116. PubMed Google Scholar Clarke NG, Hirsch RS: Personal risk factors for generalized periodontitis.[bmcoralhealth.biomedcentral.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • To approach this question, a deeper look has to be taken into the pathophysiology of cardiac pain and the excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms involved.[books.google.com]
  • Clinical, radiologic, and pathophysiologic findings. Neurolog 2005;64:1227-1232 Moncayo J, Bogousslavsky J: Eye movement disorders in posterior circulation stroke.[karger.com]
  • Pathophysiology: Third (Oculomotor) CN palsy results from damage to the nerve anywhere in its course from the third nerve nucleus in the dorsal mesencephalon, its fascicles in the brainstem parenchyma, the nerve root in subarachnoid space, or in the cavernous[neuroradiologycases.com]
  • Syncope and tainting: classification and pathophysiological basis. In: Autonomic failure. A textbook of clinical disorders of the autonomic nervous system , 4th ed. Methias CJ, Bannister R, eds. New York: Oxford University; 1999. pp. 428–436.[link.springer.com]
  • In some cases, the precise site of the lesion is clear, whereas in others, the location of the lesion is speculative. [1] Pathophysiology To understand the pathophysiology of the oculomotor nerve palsy it is essential to know its track.[eyewiki.aao.org]

Prevention

  • Collaborative Meta-Analysis of Randomised Trials of Antiplatelet Therapy for Prevention of Death, Myocardial Infarction, and Stroke in High Risk Patients. ‎[books.google.es]
  • A randomized trial of permanent cardiac pacing for the prevention of vasovagal syncope. J Am Coll Cardiol 1999; 33:16–20 PubMed Google Scholar 11. Benditt DG. Cardiac pacing for prevention of vasovagal syncope. J Am Coll Cardiol 1999; 33:21–23.[link.springer.com]
  • In this article, the authors present in depth the clinical correlates of midbrain and thalamic ischemic lesions, while also summarizing the advances in treatment and prevention of ischemic lesions involving the different vascular territories of the thalamus[medlink.com]
  • The coiling technique within the enlarged anomaly’s lumens initiates blood clotting through a thrombotic reaction, which stabilizes the malformation and prevents it from rupturing. 9,10 The risks associated with surgical clipping and endovascular coiling[reviewofoptometry.com]
  • Primary prevention Although there are many risk factors, some of them can be controlled to minimize the risk of acquiring oculomotor nerve palsy.[eyewiki.aao.org]

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