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Oral Mucosal Disorder

Disease of Oral Mucous Membrane


Presentation

  • Either of these may be of a congenital nature (present at birth) or exhibit an oral manifestation as the individual matures and develops. These maldevelopments may manifest as a number of clinical presentations, e.g., clefts and cysts.[homesteadschools.com]
  • Sollecito , Eric Stoopler Elsevier Health Sciences , 20.09.2013 - 174 Seiten 0 Rezensionen This issue features expert clinical reviews on Oral Mucosal Disorders that are commonly presented in a dental clinical setting.[books.google.de]
  • I will briefly present the most common injuries at this level: 1. ORAL THRUSH - are the most common disorders of the oral mucosa, affect 20-50% of the pupulation and female sex is more affected.[abceurodent.ro]
  • Stoopler, Eric ISBN: 9781455775873 Print ISBN: 9781455775866 Publisher: Elsevier Health Sciences Publication Year: 2013 Pages: 174 Ebook format: PDF Description This issue features expert clinical reviews on Oral Mucosal Disorders that are commonly presented[kortext.com]
  • The purpose of this study is to assess if a new method of analysing mouth samples has value as a clinical prognostic indicator for presentations of mucosal disease with associated malignant potential.[medicine.unimelb.edu.au]
Strawberry Tongue
  • In the mouth, the lips are dry and fissured, the tongue appears red with prominent papillae (strawberry tongue) [53].[rroij.com]
  • […] of papillae on the surface of the tongue (strawberry tongue) and intense erythema of the mucosal surfaces. [140] Ulceration in the oral cavity is a common presenting sign. [141] The labia may appear cracked, cherry-red, swollen, or hemorrhagic. [127][emedicine.medscape.com]
Oral Pigmentation
  • The oral cavity may be affected directly, as occurs in Addison’s disease, which leads to changes in oral pigmentations of the tongue secondary to hypovitaminosis B complex. Inflammatory lesions are the most common type and have many subcategories.[homesteadschools.com]

Treatment

  • Once the etiology is understood, the treatment can be instituted.[homesteadschools.com]
  • Higher OML prevalence in pregnant women, as compared to the non-pregnant women, indicates the importance of timely oral examination of pregnant women and subsequent treatment plans for them.[mdpi.com]
  • It must be known that recurrent thrushes require medical treatment and may be signs of general disorders.[abceurodent.ro]
  • We propose autologous transplantation as the ideal treatment for ocular surface reconstruction.[bjo.bmj.com]
  • Patients were grouped according to the treatment needed under the WHO criteria.[jfcmonline.com]

Prognosis

  • Treatment and prognosis The treatment is dependent on the TNM-stage and localisation of primary tumour.[med-college.de]
  • The prognosis is good. Lupus erythematosus* is an autoimmune disease that may be systemic or involve only skin and mucosa (discoid lupus). Both types can have skin and oral mucosal lesions.[dentalcare.com]
  • The clinical profile of patients with HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) differs quite notably from that of traditional head and neck cancer patients, and the prognosis for HPV-associated OPC is significantly better.[scmsjournal.com]
  • […] provided following this in-depth evaluation. [10] Conclusion The clinical evaluation of COMD, by including dentists and physicians, may give information about the cause, can aid in determining potential treatments, and can also provide clues about the prognosis[ijofb.org]
  • Managements of OSF Mouth opening exercise Local cortical steroid injection Surgical treatment combined with skin graft Prognosis is not good in the severe OSF patients Wen-Chen Wang 76. Oral Manifestationsof Systemic Diseases Wen-Chen Wang 77.[slideshare.net]

Etiology

  • Once the etiology is understood, the treatment can be instituted.[homesteadschools.com]
  • Parameters possibly indicative for malignant transformation of OPMDs, such as epidemiological and etiological factors, and clinical and histopathological features were also described.[bmcoralhealth.biomedcentral.com]
  • Disease Pathogenesis Lichen planus is an immune-mediated disorder of unknown etiology with a proposed basis in autoimmunity.[ucdmc.ucdavis.edu]
  • The present cases suggest that the pathogenesis and etiology of EUOM or CD30 T-cell LPD occurring in children are different from those in adults.[jpatholtm.org]
  • The site of the lesion is also an important etiological factor. Hard palate (23.1%) was the most commonly affected site in the present study, whereas the soft palate was the least involved (3.6%).[cgjonline.ca]

Epidemiology

  • An epidemiologic study of 2071 patients and a review of the literature. Arch Dermatol. 1991, 127 (11): 1684-1688.[bmcoralhealth.biomedcentral.com]
  • Epidemiologic studies provide information that is important to understand the prevalence, incidence, and severity of oral disease in a specific population, but the results of such studies have rarely been published worldwide. ( 1 , 21 ) Earlier epidemiologic[cgjonline.ca]
  • Keywords: Epidemiology, mucosal variants, oral mucosal lesions, prevalence, treatment, World Health Organization How to cite this article: Bhatnagar P, Rai S, Bhatnagar G, Kaur M, Goel S, Prabhat M.[jfcmonline.com]
  • The number of individuals over 60 years old is steadily increasing in almost all the countries, as a result of the improvement in living conditions and medical advances in therapeutics. [5] , [6] During the past decades, multiple epidemiological studies[jiaomr.in]
  • Epidemiology of Kawasaki disease in the United States and worldwide. Prog Pediatr Cardio . 1997. 6(3):181-5. Yim D, Curtis N, Cheung M, Burgner D. Update on Kawasaki disease: epidemiology, aetiology and pathogenesis.[emedicine.medscape.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • View Article PubMed Google Scholar Farhi D, Dupin N: Pathophysiology, etiologic factors, and clinical management of oral lichen planus, part I: facts and controversies. Clin Dermatol. 2010, 28 (1): 100-108.[bmcoralhealth.biomedcentral.com]
  • Thus, a frequently favored option is a surgical attempt to improve cicatricial eye diseases if the underlying pathophysiological process is controlled.[karger.com]
  • Psoriasis: pathophysiology and oral manifestations. Oral Dis . 1996 Jun. 2(2):135-44. [Medline] . Mattsson U, Warfvinge G, Jontell M. Oral psoriasis-a diagnostic dilemma: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Prevention

  • The purpose was to determine the priorities in oral health education, preventive measures, and identify the group in urgent need of treatment.[jfcmonline.com]
  • Betamethasone (1 mg/day) and cyclophosphamide (50 mg/day), administered to prevent postoperative inflammation and conjunctival fibrosis, were stopped 1–2 months after surgery. Both renal and liver function were monitored periodically.[bjo.bmj.com]
  • To prevent scarring, aggressive treatment must be used for cicatricial pemphigoid including systemic steroids and immunosuppressive drugs, especially cyclophosphamide .[dermnetnz.org]
  • It is also useful in the treatment of denture stomatitis and as prophylaxis in the prevention of oral candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. It is available as a mouthwash, gel and spray. It can stain teeth if used regularly.[patient.info]
  • Oral HPV infection: current strategies for prevention and therapy. Curr Pharm Des . 2012. 18 (34):5452-69. [Medline] . Chavan M, Jain H, Diwan N, Khedkar S, Shete A, Durkar S. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a review.[emedicine.medscape.com]

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