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Pseudomonas Septicemia

Septicemia Due to Pseudomonas


Presentation

  • Necrotizing skin lesions were also present, and the likely source of both of these lesions were septic embolic.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The present report describes a patient with CF whose course was complicated by pneumonia and septicemia caused by P. cepacia.[jhu.pure.elsevier.com]
  • Blood infections caused by pseudomona bacterium may present with fevers, chills, fatigue, and muscle and joint pain. Fever, fast heartbeat and rapid breathing may also be present.[reference.com]
  • In the present study, the incidence of septicemia was 29.73%.[jlponline.org]
  • This patient also presented other interesting features.[circ.ahajournals.org]
Fever
  • Blood infections caused by pseudomona bacterium may present with fevers, chills, fatigue, and muscle and joint pain. Fever, fast heartbeat and rapid breathing may also be present.[reference.com]
  • Concurrent septicemia in patients with dengue fever is rare and only few cases have been reported.[content.iospress.com]
  • […] higher in People with weakened immune systems Infants and children The elderly People with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and kidney or liver disease People suffering from a severe burn or physical trauma Common symptoms of sepsis are fever[icdlist.com]
  • Immediately, blood cultures turned negative, CRP levels dropped and the fever disappeared. Kidney function recovered after a few days. Hemodialysis was avoided and no clinical abnormalities related to the application of bacteriophages were observed.[morressier.com]
  • On the second day in the hospital he was confused and became more toxic with high fever, dyspnoea and hallucination. New lesions continued erupting. Laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis (9400 cells lc mm) and a raised ESR (60mm first hr).[ijdvl.com]
Chills
  • Blood infections caused by pseudomona bacterium may present with fevers, chills, fatigue, and muscle and joint pain. Fever, fast heartbeat and rapid breathing may also be present.[reference.com]
  • People with weakened immune systems Infants and children The elderly People with chronic illnesses, such as diabetes, AIDS, cancer, and kidney or liver disease People suffering from a severe burn or physical trauma Common symptoms of sepsis are fever, chills[icdlist.com]
  • Symptoms include: chills fever cough with or without sputum production difficulty breathing Skin When this bacterium infects the skin, it most often affects the hair follicles. This is called folliculitis.[healthline.com]
  • Septicaemia sometimes has no symptoms, especially in its early stages, but when there are symptoms these include: A sudden high temperature with chills Generally feeling unwell Gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea Abdominal[netdoctor.co.uk]
Hodgkin's Disease
  • The following case report is probably the first one of fatal pseudomonas septicemia in a symptomatic splenectomised patient with Hodgkin's disease.[annals.org]
Tachycardia
  • […] when there are symptoms these include: A sudden high temperature with chills Generally feeling unwell Gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea Abdominal pain Confusion and anxiety Shortness of breath A very fast heart rate (tachycardia[netdoctor.co.uk]
  • […] altered consciousness, mental confusion or delirium ) Fast respiratory rate ( 22 breaths/minute) Low blood pressure ( 100 mm Hg systolic) However, patients may have many other signs and symptoms that can occur with sepsis, such as elevated heart rate (tachycardia[medicinenet.com]
  • […] deficits Eye infections: Lid edema, conjunctival erythema and chemosis, and severe mucopurulent discharge Malignant otitis externa: Erythematous, swollen, and inflamed external auditory canal; local lymphadenopathy Bacteremia: Fever, tachypnea, and tachycardia[emedicine.medscape.com]
Right Shoulder Pain
  • Case Report A 53-year-old woman was brought by ambulance to the emergency department of our hospital due to fever and right shoulder pain for a few hours.[scirp.org]

Workup

  • During the second PICU day, the infant underwent surgical debridement of the necrotic lesion ( Fig. 3 ), and due to the severe evolution and marked neutropenia, a complete workup for immunodeficiency was made in association with the empirical use of human[scielo.br]
  • […] procedures that may be helpful in specific scenarios include the following: Fluorescein staining and slit-lamp examination of the cornea for keratitis Flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage or bronchial brushing Thoracocentesis See Workup[emedicine.medscape.com]

Treatment

  • R Moniri Z Mosayebi AH Movahedian Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Multi-drug resistance, Abstract The emergence of multi-drug resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has complicated treatment decision and may lead to treatment failures.[ijph.tums.ac.ir]
  • Abstract The successful treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia in a 24-year-old patient by antibiotic therapy, reoperation, and insertion of a new aortic valve prosthesis three weeks after total aortic valve replacement is reported.[circ.ahajournals.org]

Prognosis

  • The prognosis of combined orbital cellulitis and panophthalmitis is poor.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Bisbe J, Gatell JM, Puig J, Mallolas J, Martínez JA, Jimenez de Anta MT, Soriano E Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia: univariate and multivariate analyses of factors influencing the prognosis in 133 episodes.[link.springer.com]
  • An early diagnosis and antibiotic treatment are essential to improve the prognosis of the disease.[revistanefrologia.com]

Etiology

  • The etiological agents in the reported cases were Pneumococcus or Hemophilus influenzae (1-4). Fatal Pseudomonas septicemia has been reported in one case of nonHodgkin's lymphoma (5).[annals.org]
  • An evaluation of the etiologic factors predisposing to initial infection with Ps. . . .[nejm.org]
  • McGowan JE Changing etiology of nosocomial bacteremia and fungemia and other hospital-acquired infections. Reviews of Infectious Diseases 1985, 7: 357–370. PubMed Google Scholar 4.[link.springer.com]

Epidemiology

  • Abstract The epidemiological and biochemical characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains causing septicemia in a Spanish hospital over a ten-year period (1981–1990) were analyzed.[link.springer.com]
  • It provides balanced coverage of specific groups of microorganisms and the work-up of clinical specimens by organ system, and also discusses the role of the microbiology laboratory in regard to emerging infections, healthcare epidemiology, and bioterrorism[books.google.ro]
  • .: Epidemiology and clinical outcome of patients with multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.Clin Infect Dis; 28: 1128-1133.1999 4) IDWR(感染症発生動向調査週報)ホームページ 感染症の話 2002年第17週号()l 5) Defez C, Fabbro-Peray P, Bouziges N, et al.: Risk factors for multidrugresistant[bdj.co.jp]
  • Epidemiology The most common cause of mortality in the intensive care unit is septic shock. Even with the best treatment mortality ranges from 15% in patients with sepsis to 40-60% in patients with septic shock.[faculty.ccbcmd.edu]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Pathophysiology P aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen. It rarely causes disease in healthy persons.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Prevention

  • The adequate evaluation of the patient at risk, prevention, and early therapy are essential.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Doctors try to treat the infection, sustain the vital organs, and prevent a drop in blood pressure. Many patients receive oxygen and intravenous fluids. Other types of treatment, such as respirators or kidney dialysis, may be necessary.[icdlist.com]
  • Selective decontamination should be considered in compromised patients with oral carriage of AGNB to prevent serious systemic infection. Additional information Refereed Paper References 1 Preston A J, Gosney M A, Noon S, Martin M V.[nature.com]
  • Drying your ears after swimming can also help prevent swimmer’s ear.[healthline.com]

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