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Pseudopelade of Brocq


Presentation

  • Four patients are presented with pseudopelade of Brocq whose symptoms also illustrate the spectrum of symptoms of lichen planus.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • AB - We report a case of a 16-year-old girl affected by pseudopelade of Brocq who presented with hair casts at the borders of the lesion.[moh-it.pure.elsevier.com]
  • It classically presents as porcelain white hypopigmented and slightly depressed atrophic plaque. There is no standard treatment for PPB.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Nail Abnormality
  • Sean Linford, nail Abnormalities, Clues to Systemic Disease. James, William, Berger, Timothy, Elston, Dirk, andrews Diseases of the Skin, Clinical Dermatology. Muehrcke Lines of the Fingernails at eMedicine Muehrckes Lines of the Fingernails on WebMD[wikivisually.com]
Collapse
  • Analysis of tissue biopsies of end stage lesions show that all follicular structures including sebaceous epithelium are destroyed to be replaced by collapsed and aggregated follicular adventitia.[keratin.com]
Pruritus
  • The most common symptoms were increased shedding/hair loss (100%), pruritus (35%), and scalp tenderness (46%).[jdrntruhs.org]
  • Scalp lice should always be sought in cases of hair loss accompanied by pruritus. Lice are most likely to be found around and behind the ears and on the nape of the neck. Lymphadenopathy may also be present.[what-when-how.com]
  • First signs of LPP include alopecia and pruritus. Rarely pain, burning, and seborrheic dermatitis are observed.[intechopen.com]
  • APPROACH TO THE PATIENT  History      Clinical Findings    Onset Presence of- pruritus, irritation, pain, erythema and/or drainage from the scalp Evaluate for autoimmune disease, systemic illness, infections, neoplasms, associated inflammatory[slideshare.net]
  • In DLE, the activity of the disease is primarily focused in the center of the plaque, whereas in LPP the activity predominately occurred at the periphery.[14&16] Scalp pain and pruritus were more pronounced in LPP.A positive hair pull test assisted in[article.sapub.org]
Leukonychia
  • Cicatricial alopecia Louis-Anne-Jean Brocq List of cutaneous conditions References Template:Skin-appendage-stub v t e Disorders of skin appendages ( L60-75, 700-709 ) Nail thickness: Onychogryphosis · Onychauxis color: Beau's lines · Yellow nail syndrome · Leukonychia[wikidoc.org]
  • Cicatricial alopecia Louis-Anne-Jean Brocq List of cutaneous conditions References Template:Skin-appendage-stub v t e Disorders of skin appendages ( L60-75 , 700-709 ) Nail thickness: Onychogryphosis · Onychauxis color: Beau's lines · Yellow nail syndrome · Leukonychia[wikidoc.org]
  • Muehrcke's nails – Muehrckes nails, Muehrckes lines, or leukonychia striata are changes in the fingernail that may be a sign of an underlying medical disorder or condition. Muehrckes lines are lines that extend all the way across the nail.[wikivisually.com]
Anhidrosis
  • Rosacea ( Perioral dermatitis, Rhinophyma ) Follicular cysts Epidermoid cyst · Trichilemmal cyst · Sebaceous cyst · Steatocystoma multiplex Inflammation Pseudofolliculitis barbae · Hidradenitis suppurativa · Folliculitis Sweat glands eccrine ( Miliaria, Anhidrosis[wikidoc.org]
  • Rosacea ( Perioral dermatitis , Rhinophyma ) Follicular cysts Epidermoid cyst · Trichilemmal cyst · Sebaceous cyst · Steatocystoma multiplex Inflammation Pseudofolliculitis barbae · Hidradenitis suppurativa · Folliculitis Sweat glands eccrine ( Miliaria , Anhidrosis[wikidoc.org]
Yellow Nails
  • nail syndrome · Leukonychia shape: Koilonychia · Clubbing other: Ingrown nail · Anonychia Hair Hair loss Alopecia areata ( Alopecia totalis, Alopecia universalis, Ophiasis ) Androgenic alopecia · Hypotrichosis · Telogen effluvium · Traction alopecia[wikidoc.org]
  • nail syndrome · Leukonychia shape: Koilonychia · Clubbing other: Ingrown nail · Anonychia Hair Hair loss Alopecia areata ( Alopecia totalis , Alopecia universalis , Ophiasis ) Androgenic alopecia · Hypotrichosis · Telogen effluvium · Traction alopecia[wikidoc.org]
Acneiform Eruption
  • eruption ( Acne vulgaris, Chloracne, Blackhead ) · Rosacea ( Perioral dermatitis, Rhinophyma ) Follicular cysts Epidermoid cyst · Trichilemmal cyst · Sebaceous cyst · Steatocystoma multiplex Inflammation Pseudofolliculitis barbae · Hidradenitis suppurativa[wikidoc.org]
  • eruption ( Acne vulgaris , Chloracne , Blackhead ) · Rosacea ( Perioral dermatitis , Rhinophyma ) Follicular cysts Epidermoid cyst · Trichilemmal cyst · Sebaceous cyst · Steatocystoma multiplex Inflammation Pseudofolliculitis barbae · Hidradenitis suppurativa[wikidoc.org]
Compulsive Disorder
  • (Kraemer, 1999, p. 299) Differentiating TM from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) can be challenging in some cases. TM is similar to OCD because there is a “sense of gratification” or “relief” when pulling the hair out.[brookskent.wordpress.com]
Distractibility
  • Most people diagnosed with TM report that the act of pulling typically occurs during affective states of relaxation and distraction.[brookskent.wordpress.com]
Stroke
  • For example: prostate cancer AND radiation heart disease AND stroke AND California Use OR (all upper case) to find study records that contain either term connected by OR.[ichgcp.net]
Cognitive Deficit

Workup

Borrelia Burgdorferi
  • Other factors that may be involved include infections with Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacterium that causes Lyme disease and issues with the cells involved in hair growth ( stem cell failure). [1] [2] [3] There is no standard treatment for PBB.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • Other factors that may be involved include infections with Borrelia burgdorferi , the bacterium that causes Lyme disease and issues with the cells involved in hair growth ( stem cell failure). [1] [2] [3] There is no standard treatment for PBB.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • Even with treatment, some cases to spread, albeit very slowly The goal of treatment is to stop the disease. Hair regrowth in the bald areas is not possible in most cases. Even with treatment, some hair loss can still occur, albeit very slowly.[canadianhairlossfoundation.org]
  • The choice of treatment prescribed varies from person to person and depends mainly on the activity, extent of the disease and patient's tolerance to the treatment.[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]
  • Treatment The treatment by the dermatologist aimed at trying to slow down the process. There medication may be prescribed for external use; such as cortisone ointment or internal use, such as doxycycline or Plaquenil.[goodstrict.com]
  • Another belief is that PPB is the end result of any inflammatory alopecia and no further treatment is needed. The mechanism is unknown as to why this occurs.[drhillhairloss.com]

Prognosis

  • The prognosis is variable and depends on the etiology and severity of hair loss.[amboss.com]
  • Prognosis - Pseudo-Pelade of Brocq Not supplied. Treatment - Pseudo-Pelade of Brocq As the cause of this diseases is still unknown, pinpointing this problem is quite hard since there are no obvious signs of inflammation of the scalp.[checkorphan.org]
  • Prognosis In reference to pseudopelade as a burnt-out form of alopecia discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) or lichen planopilaris (LLP), the prognosis depends on the underlying disease process.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • The combination of all the above, in addition to the fact that TM is generally acknowledged as one of the more persistent and difficult to treat disorders, prevents me from providing any prognosis other than “this treatment will work as well as the client[brookskent.wordpress.com]

Etiology

  • The prognosis is variable and depends on the etiology and severity of hair loss.[amboss.com]
  • Clinical cases PSEUDOPELADE OF BROCQ Pseudopelade of Brocq is a chronic, slowly progressive, lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia whose exact etiology remains unknown.[revistasrd.ro]
  • Surgical improvement of cicatricial alopecia of diverse etiology. Arch Dermatol. 1968 Mar;97(3):331-4.[keratin.com]
  • We have treated 17 patients having a progressive pseudopelade with acitretin or thalidomide, two treatments effectives in discoid lupus erythematosus and in lichen planus, the main etiologies of pseudopelade.[ehrs.org]
  • Its etiology is not fully understood [ 4 , 29 ].[intechopen.com]

Epidemiology

  • Pseudopelade of brocq clinical features Attempts to clearly explain pseudopelade of Brocq clinicopathologically have been unsuccessful, and the true epidemiology of pseudopelade of Brocq remains an unsolved mystery.[keratin.com]
  • Epidemiology Most common type of alopecia Prevalence : Increases with age Sex: (but very common in women as well) Age at onset: puberty in males; menopause in females Ethnicity: more common in white populations Etiology Increased androgen sensitivity[amboss.com]
  • Epidemiology Frequency The true prevalence of pseudopelade of Brocq in the general population is unknown, but it would appear to be very uncommon. Race Pseudopelade of Brocq is more common in whites.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Objective: To evaluate the epidemiological, clinical, and histopathological characteristics of various acquired primary cicatricial alopecias.[jdrntruhs.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • ., lichen planopilaris [LPP], discoid lupus erythematosus [DLE]) Pathophysiology corresponds to underlying disease process.[ 11 ] Primary idiopathic pseudopelade where pathophysiology is unknown.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Pathophysiology The following two types of pseudopelade of Brocq are recognized: Burnt-out or end-stage scarring alopecias (eg, LLP, DLE) [5] - Pathophysiology corresponds to underlying disease process Primary idiopathic pseudopelade - Pathophysiology[emedicine.medscape.com]

Prevention

  • In the beginning of the disease process, certain medication, such as steroids, may be used in an effort to prevent further hair loss. [1] [3] Last updated: 9/15/2016[rarediseases.info.nih.gov]

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