Edit concept Question Editor Create issue ticket

Recurrent Sinusitis


Presentation

  • Among these subjects, sinusal-mucosal thickening was present in 75% (n 44), and concha hypertrophy was present in 51% (n 30). Adenoid hypertrophy was present in 20% (n 12), and septum deviation was present in 17% (n 10).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Recurrent Sinusitis
  • The complications of unresolved recurrent sinusitis may include intracranial conditions with significant clinical implications.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Inflammation
  • An immunologic evaluation should be performed and uncommon causes of sinus inflammation should be addressed later in the course to reduce inflammation either to avoid surgery or improve surgical outcomes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Fishing
  • Study supplements were a lemon-flavored cod liver oil and a children's multivitamin-mineral with selenium, prescribed in escalating doses; at higher doses, fish oil was substituted for cod liver oil.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Recurrent Infection
  • Since glandular secretions are rich in antimicrobial factors, such as LFN, LZM, and sIgA, it appears possible that the inability to secrete glandular proteins normally may predispose to recurrent infections.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Swelling
  • Inflammation and swelling of the mucosa of the tube openings causes stenosis or blockage. Inflammatory foci, usually hidden in the anterior ethmoid cell system, are not always apparent in a plain film of the paranasal sinuses.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Rhinitis
  • In the upper airways, the inflammation presents itself with symptoms of chronic rhinitis, leading to recurrent sinusitis, in some patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Aspiration
  • METHODS: Nasal secretions were collected by vacuum aspiration from 15 individuals with PAR RS, 16 with PAR alone, and 16 controls.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Common Cold
  • CONCLUSIONS: Some patients are susceptible to both sinusitislike symptoms and radiologic findings during viral common colds.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Suggestibility
  • This article explores recurrent sinusitis and its pathophysiology, and suggests a medical treatment regimen using nasally inhaled corticosteroids together with antimicrobial and supportive therapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Confusion
  • Nasal dermoid sinus cysts are the most common congenital midline nasofrontal masses, but they can easily be confused with simple recurrent sinusitis upon clinical presentation.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

  • We give a broad overview of the workup of chronic rhinosinusitis, focusing on immune deficiency, an often overlooked but clinically important aspect of the sinusitis workup.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that intranasal corticosteroid treatment produces additional relief in the treatment of acute sinusitis with oral antibiotics.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Etiology

  • The viral etiology of the common cold (verified in 67% of the episodes) was similar in both groups. Pathogenic bacteria were isolated from the middle meatus in 24% (6) of the control patients and only 9% (2) of the sinusitis-prone patients (P .15).[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Pathophysiology

  • This article explores recurrent sinusitis and its pathophysiology, and suggests a medical treatment regimen using nasally inhaled corticosteroids together with antimicrobial and supportive therapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prevention

  • Problems such as recognition of the disorder and adequate treatment are complicated by the lack of universal definition, absence of preventive measures, and dearth of clear end-point definitions for successful therapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Ask Question

5000 Characters left Format the text using: # Heading, **bold**, _italic_. HTML code is not allowed.
By publishing this question you agree to the TOS and Privacy policy.
• Use a precise title for your question.
• Ask a specific question and provide age, sex, symptoms, type and duration of treatment.
• Respect your own and other people's privacy, never post full names or contact information.
• Inappropriate questions will be deleted.
• In urgent cases contact a physician, visit a hospital or call an emergency service!