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Rupture of the Gastrocnemius Muscle

Rupture of Gastrocnemius Muscle


Presentation

  • The clinical presentation, as well as adjunctive techniques in the diagnosis of a patient with a partial rupture of the gastrocnemius muscle, and a compartment syndrome, were presented.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The presentation of a gastrocnemius rupture is the acute onset of calf pain and subsequent ecchymosis. Most of these injuries can be treated symptomatically with good results.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • An unusual case is presented in which ipsilateral thrombophlebitis developed in a preexisting obvious case of tennis leg.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Individual case presentations provide a valuable tool for differential diagnosis.[books.google.com]
  • In the present case report we describe for the first time how, a similar injury arises from a very different way of moving that may occur during the practice of j\ {u}d\ {o}. Case presentation.[biblio.ugent.be]
Italian
  • He has been a member of the Medical Commission of the Italian Track and Field Federation (FIDAL) and Director of Medical Services and a member of the Board of Directors of the Centro Universitario Sportivo of Torino (CUS Torino) for more than 35 years[books.google.com]
Hunting
Surgical Procedure
  • Certain conditions increase a person's risk of developing a blood clot such as: Increasing age Pregnancy Obesity Immobilization Cancer Smoking Undergoing a recent surgical procedure A blood clot is a very serious cause of calf pain because, without treatment[verywell.com]
Pneumonia
  • الصفحة 71 - BL, et al: Adult respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia, and mortality following thoracic injury and a femoral fracture treated either with intramedullary nailing with reaming or with a plate. ‏[books.google.com]
Calf Pain
  • The presentation of a gastrocnemius rupture is the acute onset of calf pain and subsequent ecchymosis. Most of these injuries can be treated symptomatically with good results.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • ., mild versus severe)—to start getting to the bottom of why you have calf pain.[verywell.com]
  • Conclusion The causes of calf pain are multiple, and often difficult to diagnose clinically.[radsource.us]
  • Symptoms Patients often report hearing a pop in the back of their calf. Pain and swelling most commonly at the junction of calf muscle and the Achilles tendon, the location of the rupture.[stoneclinic.com]
  • It's the result of muscles and tendons losing elasticity as we age, and it's the most common cause of calf pain in athletes.[hss.edu]
Calf Pain
  • The presentation of a gastrocnemius rupture is the acute onset of calf pain and subsequent ecchymosis. Most of these injuries can be treated symptomatically with good results.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • ., mild versus severe)—to start getting to the bottom of why you have calf pain.[verywell.com]
  • Conclusion The causes of calf pain are multiple, and often difficult to diagnose clinically.[radsource.us]
  • Symptoms Patients often report hearing a pop in the back of their calf. Pain and swelling most commonly at the junction of calf muscle and the Achilles tendon, the location of the rupture.[stoneclinic.com]
  • It's the result of muscles and tendons losing elasticity as we age, and it's the most common cause of calf pain in athletes.[hss.edu]
Leg Pain
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS We reviewed the sonographic and/or MR imaging findings of 543 patients who were referred for the evaluation of leg pain and swelling during the last 7 years.[semanticscholar.org]
  • Muscle weakness, tissue inflammation and leg pain can be addressed through home and medical treatments.[livestrong.com]
  • An unusual presentation of a medial gastrocnemius injury during namaz praying was reported by Yilmaz et al, who performed a retrospective study of the sonographic and magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings of patients referred over 7 years with leg pain[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • pain (Medical Encyclopedia) Shin splints - self-care (Medical Encyclopedia) Tibial nerve dysfunction (Medical Encyclopedia) Venous insufficiency (Medical Encyclopedia) [ Read More ] Sprains and Strains A sprain is a stretched or torn ligament.[icdlist.com]
  • Body chills due to extreme cold or illness will cause the gastroc to shorten and tighten causing lower leg pain. The gastroc is the muscle that gives the calf its shape.[thewellnessdigest.com]
Joint Dislocation
  • Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg problems.[icdlist.com]
Suggestibility
  • The incidence is greatest in the middle-aged, as reported by Millar, 3 who reported a mean age of 42 years for men and 46 for women, which suggests a degenerative process analogous to a rupture of the long head of the biceps, the rotator cuff of the shoulder[link.springer.com]
  • The NYU Langone Medical Center suggests applying hot packs before rehab stretching and exercise. A torn calf muscle can heal on its own, but in cases in which pain and weakness persist, surgery may be a valid option.[livestrong.com]
  • In the remaining two cases, both with symptoms suggesting TL, one patient had a tear of the proximal musculotendinous junction and one had a ruptured Baker's cyst.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • […] and presentation, associated fluid collection between the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was found in 11 of 14 (78.5%) patients, and isolated fluid collection between the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was seen in 1 patient. [7] The investigators suggested[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Medial calf injuries are most commonly seen acutely, but up to 20% of affected patients report a prodrome of calf tightness several days before the injury, thus suggesting a potential chronic predisposition.[physiotherapy-treatment.com]
Confusion
  • Gastrocnemius musculotendinous rupture: a condition confused with thrombophlebitis. South Med J 77(9):1143–5 Google Scholar 5. Hutchinson MR, Laprade RF, Burnett QM. 1995; Injury surveillance at the USTA boys’ tennis championships: a 6-year study.[link.springer.com]
  • Achilles Tendonitis Achilles Tendinosis and Achilles Tendonitis (often spelled Achilles Tendinitis) are often confused.[achillestendon.com]
  • […] ultrasound report noted fluid/blood collection within the medial gastrocnemius (calf) muscle, which in the light of the patient’s history, confirmed the patient's diagnosis: Gastrocnemius muscle tear (calf tear) As in this patient, the diagnosis can be confused[columbiaasia.com]
  • May be confused with an Achilles tendon rupture. Immediate inability to weightbear on the foot. Immediate pain and swelling. Swelling and discoloration extend down to the ankle and heel area.[southfloridasportsmedicine.com]
  • Other entities that can be confused with plantaris tendon and medial gastrocnemius rupture are Baker cyst rupture and deep venous thrombosis.[aneskey.com]
Irritability
  • Injections of irritating medicaments into the gastrocnemius muscle may cause necrosis and rupture. The hock remains flexed.[msdvetmanual.com]
  • The pack is filled with pliable gel and has a soft frost free cover that will not irritate your skin. For recent injuries, use it cold to reduce swelling. For older injures or chronic pain use heat to relax the muscles and increase circulation.[thewellnessdigest.com]
  • When the tendon becomes irritated, usually as a result of overuse, a burning pain may develop in the back of the leg, usually just above the heel. Calf pain and stiffness may also be present.[verywell.com]
Tingling
  • Nerve Entrapment An enlarged or swollen calf can place pressure on nerves, causing symptoms like numbness, tingling, and/or sharp pain. The two nerve entrapments that most commonly cause calf pain are sural nerve and peroneal nerve entrapment.[verywell.com]
Paresthesia
  • Extensive hematoma formation led to marked edema, paresthesias, muscle weakness, and severe pain in the involved leg.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

  • CONCLUSIONS: US is the imaging modality of choice in clinical suspicion of TL, both in the initial workup of the patient and in the follow-up.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • A 2-year follow-up showed that the surgical approach with suture of the muscle gave better results than conservative treatment, especially in the younger and athletic patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Features coverage of the latest treatment innovations including antibiotic residue testing, care of individual metabolic disease, troubleshooting, and much more.[books.google.com]
  • الصفحة 32 - GUSTILO, RB, and ANDERSON, JT: Prevention of Infection in the Treatment of One Thousand and Twenty-five Open Fractures of Long Bones. Retrospective and Prospective Analyses. J. Bone and Joint Surg., 58-A: 453-458, June 1976. ‏[books.google.com]
  • Successful treatment is extremely unlikely in heavy adult animals.[msdvetmanual.com]
  • Stay on top of the latest procedures and treatment guidelines with updated coverage of 184 topics, including Swimmer’s Ear, Dental Pain, Broken Rib, Locked Knee, Puncture Wounds, and Sunburn. Get procedural sedation recommendations from Dr.[books.google.com]

Prognosis

  • -principle [Protection-Rest-Ice-Compression-Elevation]) and rehabilitation were adhered to, which contributes to excellent prognosis of partial gastrocnemius ruptures. Uniqueness of the study.[biblio.ugent.be]
  • PROGNOSIS: Prognosis for these injuries is excellent. They never need to be corrected surgically, even in a collegiate or professional athlete.[southfloridasportsmedicine.com]
  • […] gastrocnemius and superficial to the soleus a focal area of disruption of muscle continuity noted along the deep aspect of the medial head of the gastrocnemius, with associated muscle edema the plantaris tendon may either be torn or intact Treatment and prognosis[radiopaedia.org]
  • Ruptured Tendon Prognosis The prognosis for both surgery and nonsurgical treatment varies with the location and severity of the rupture. Surgical repair, in concert with additional physical therapy, can result in return to normal strength.[emedicinehealth.com]
  • In the Kwak study, two patients were asymptomatic until two weeks after injury, and one showed delayed fluid collection, leading the authors to conclude that the sooner a diagnosis was made, the better the prognosis.[auntminnie.com]

Etiology

  • […] muscle group at lower leg level, unspecified leg, initial See all strain lower leg posterior ICD-10 A- initial encounter D- subsequent encounter S- sequela Gastrocnemius Tear ICD-9 844.9 (unspecified sprain and strain of knee and leg) Gastrocnemius Tear Etiology[eorif.com]

Epidemiology

  • […] lower leg level, unspecified leg, initial See all strain lower leg posterior ICD-10 A- initial encounter D- subsequent encounter S- sequela Gastrocnemius Tear ICD-9 844.9 (unspecified sprain and strain of knee and leg) Gastrocnemius Tear Etiology / Epidemiology[eorif.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Prevention

  • Revised drug usage recommendations and legal considerations present the most current information in these critical areas to help you prevent dangerous or costly errors.[books.google.com]
  • الصفحة 32 - GUSTILO, RB, and ANDERSON, JT: Prevention of Infection in the Treatment of One Thousand and Twenty-five Open Fractures of Long Bones. Retrospective and Prospective Analyses. J. Bone and Joint Surg., 58-A: 453-458, June 1976. ‏[books.google.com]
  • As Chairman of the ISAKOS Leg, Ankle, and Foot Committee he heads an international group of experts in the field, and as FIFA F-MARC Board Member and Instructor he is also involved in research, injury prevention, delivering lectures worldwide, publishing[books.google.com]
  • Find out more about having physiotherapy Preventing further injuries Some things you can do to help prevent calf strains include: Warming up properly before you exercise Targeted training to strengthen muscles and improve flexibility Making a change to[bmihealthcare.co.uk]
  • Rest: to prevent further damage.[vivomed.com]

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