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Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

Saccharomyces Cerevisae


Presentation

  • We use cookies in a very limited number of scenarios that are all present to help the users to have an easier experience. List of cookies present on a website managed by BioloMICS: 1.[mycobank.org]
  • We present here a case of allergic bronchopulmonary fungal disease caused by S. cerevisiae antigen.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Also, metabolic engineering efforts to alter sucrose catabolism are presented in a chronological manner.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Most of the interfering structures present in the glycoengineered strain were eliminated by deletion of the MNN1 gene.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Herein, we present a 46-year-old woman who has uveitis, autoimmune thyroiditis, and primary ovarian failure. Based on the coexistence of these diseases, the patient was diagnosed with APS type III.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Asymptomatic
  • Nine patients with 20 vaginal isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae who presented with either asymptomatic vaginal colonization or symptomatic vaginitis indistinguishable from that caused by Candida albicans are described.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Cremonini et al[ 134 ] first explored the efficacy of probiotics to eradicate H. pylori in 85 asymptomatic carriers.[doi.org]
Hypothermia
  • The case is remarkable for its apparent origin in a bleeding esophageal lesion, for its clinical characteristics, including profound neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, hypothermia, and monocytopenia, and for its cure by amphotericin B.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Rhinitis
  • At the age of 6, being atopic dermatitis and rhinitis well controlled by drugs, he began to experience generalized urticaria and asthma after eating pizza and bread, but only fresh from the oven.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

  • The diagnostic workup revealed single sensitization to baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), and a severe systemic reaction also occurred during the prick-by-prick procedure.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Coxiella Burnetii
  • Abstract Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative obligate parasitic bacterium that causes the disease Q-fever in humans.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • Two days after the end of the treatment, the patient developed septic shock, and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae was isolated in the central and peripheral blood cultures. After antifungal treatment (Amphotericin B), the blood cultures were negative.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • It was shown by Annexin V-PI assay that 110 µM clotrimazole treatment caused to death by 35.5 2.48% apoptotic and only 13.1 0.08% necrotic pathway within 30 min.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii is a biotherapeutic agent used for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases, such as diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile, in addition to the antibiotic therapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Lastly, pre-treatment with S. cerevisiae inhibited interleukin-8 production by ETEC-infected intestinal cells.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We present two fungemia cases in an intensive care unit following probiotic treatment containing S. boulardii. We are warning the safety of probiotic treatment in critically ill patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • Prognosis in Crohn’s disease-based on results from a regional patient group from the county of Copenhagen. Gut 1985 ; 26 : 146 –50. Elliott PR, Ritchie JK, Lennard-Jones JE. Prognosis of colonic Crohn’s disease.[gut.bmj.com]
  • Prognosis in Crohn’s disease-based on results from a regional patient group from the county of Copenhagen. Gut 1985 ; 26 : 146 –50. Elliott PR , Ritchie JK, Lennard-Jones JE. Prognosis of colonic Crohn’s disease.[gut.bmj.com]
  • […] antibody (pANCA), anti-CBir1 (anti-flagellin antibody), and anti-Omp C (anti-outer membrane protein antibody), may be ordered together as a panel and the overall findings evaluated to either help distinguish between CD and UC or to try to help determine a prognosis[labtestsonline.org]
  • Fungemia from S. cerevisiae (non-boulardii strains) have also been reported and are similar to S. boulardii cases, but have poorer prognosis[ 195, 196 ].[doi.org]

Etiology

  • Remarkably, the prospective etiological agent, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purely and repeatedly cultured from her sputum. Allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) was diagnosed based on clinical, serological, and pathological criteria.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • However, even though organ involvement was never demonstrated, septic shock with no other etiology was observed in one of our patients. All patients had an indwelling vascular catheter.[doi.org]
  • A number of investigators have described the use of a nested-PCR approach combining ITS universal primers with species-specific primers to confirm the etiology of B. dermatitidis and H. capsulatum in paraffin-embedded tissue ( 2, 3, 8, 11 ).[doi.org]
  • The etiologies of acute adult diarrhea may include infectious agents ( Entamoeba histolytica, E. coli, or Salmonella) or may be idiopathic.[doi.org]

Epidemiology

  • We discuss the epidemiology and pathology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the cancer patient population.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In three patients with recurrent vaginitis, a unique epidemiological relationship was documented between S. cerevisiae and Torulopsis glabrata, another unusual and resistant vaginal pathogen.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • An epidemiological study was performed, and the medical records for all patients who were in the unit during the second half of April were assessed.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • This review discusses the epidemiologic profiles of these invasive mycoses in North America, as well as risk factors for infection, and the pathogens’ antifungal susceptibility. Additional information Acknowledgements Declaration of interest : Drs.[doi.org]
  • Epidemiology of invasive candidiasis: a persistent public health problem. Clin. Microbiol.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • […] one copy of α-synuclein, which is known to directly interact with copper, leads to a pronounced aggravation of copper toxicity in vps35Δ cells, thereby linking the regulation of copper homeostasis by Vps35p in yeast to one of the key molecules in PD pathophysiology[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) refers to 2 diseases, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn disease (CD), which produce inflammation[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
  • Colombel, Antibodies: useful tools or pathophysiology markers?, IBD 2007 — Achievements in Research and Clinical Practice, 10.1007/978-1-4020-6987-1_12, (107-117), (2008). P. L.[doi.org]

Prevention

  • Human chaperone DnaJB6, an Hsp70 co-chaperone whose defects cause myopathies, protects cells from polyglutamine toxicity and prevents purified polyglutamine and Aβ peptides from forming amyloid.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • This data supports the idea that yeast mtDNA replication is initiated by a DSB and bKu inhibits mtDNA replication by binding to a DSB at ori5, preventing mtDNA segregation to daughter cells.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • LFBE has the potential to prevent obesity and its related metabolic diseases.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii is a biotherapeutic agent used for the prevention and treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases, such as diarrhoea caused by Clostridium difficile, in addition to the antibiotic therapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The patient was receiving prophylaxis treatment with Saccharomyces boulardii capsules (Codex) to prevent diarrhea, which is commonly associated with this type of chemotherapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

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