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Scalenus Anticus Syndrome

Nonne's Cervical Syndrome


Presentation

  • Seite 36 - Pain is considered widespread when all of the following are present: pain in the left side of the body, pain in the right side of the body, pain above the waist, and pain below the waist.[books.google.com]
  • This book presents the most up-to-date knowledge concerning Raynaud's disease, an autoimmune disorder distinguished by well-demarcated blanching or cyanosis of one or more digits on exposure to cold, that occurs in episodic attacks.[books.google.de]
  • Published in association with the Society for Vascular Surgery, Rutherford’s Vascular Surgery presents state-of-the-art updates on all aspects of vascular health care.[books.google.de]
  • Covering the full range of diseases/disorders most important to vascular surgeons, this full-color atlas presents over 100 common and complex procedures , including open and endovascular techniques, with an emphasis on anatomy and imaging studies as they[books.google.de]
  • Bilateral thoracic outlet syndrome: An uncommon presentation of a rare condition in children. Ann Indian Acad Neurol[annalsofian.org]
Leg Length Inequality
  • A left-side leg-length inequality potentially indicative of putative upper cervical subluxation was also noted.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Buttock Pain
  • In this definition, shoulder and buttock pain are considered as pain for each involved side. "Low back" pain is considered lower segment pain. ‎[books.google.com]
Secondary Amenorrhea
  • amenorrhea; • secondary anemia; • secondary arrest; • self administration; • self agglutination; •… … Dictionary of medical acronyms & abbreviations[medicine.academic.ru]
Amenorrhea
  • […] absence of a definite disease or of some substance in any of the fluids, tissues,… … Medical dictionary SA — • sacro anterior; • salicylamide; • salicylic acid; • saline [solution]; • salt added; • sarcoidosis; • sarcoma; • scalenus anticus; • secondary amenorrhea[medicine.academic.ru]
Numbness of the Hand
  • Double Crush Syndrome Patients with thoracic outlet syndrome usually have symptoms of tingling and numbness in the hand. These hand symptoms are similar to those of carpal tunnel syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome.[nerve.wustl.edu]
  • " in their hand even in the absence of neurological deficit.[dynamicchiropractic.com]
Cervicobrachial Syndrome
  • syndrome 2016 2017 2018 2019 Billable/Specific Code Type 2 Excludes cervical disc disorder ( M50.- ) thoracic outlet syndrome ( G54.0 ) Angiospasm (peripheral) (traumatic) (vessel) I73.9 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code I73.9 Peripheral vascular disease, unspecified[icd10data.com]

Workup

  • […] simple blood tests may refine the differential diagnosis for thoracic outlet syndrome, including a blood glucose level, complete blood cell (CBC) count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), basic metabolic panel, thyrotropin level, and rheumatologic workup[emedicine.medscape.com]

Treatment

  • 20 What are the treatments for cushings disease/ syndrome? Depends: The treatment options depend on the cause of the cushing's syndrome. If the cause is due to overuse of steroids , then the treatment is to lower the dose.[healthtap.com]
  • […] and harvest of the femoropopliteal vein; and endovascular treatment of aortic arch vessels, subclavian and axillary artery.[books.google.de]
  • The only available text on Raynaud's, the book includes a comprehensive discussion of the physiology of finger blood flow, and coverage of both old and new treatment modalities.[books.google.de]
  • Treatment was limited to chiropractic, upper cervical, vectored, linear adjustment of the atlas vertebra. Temperature differential between the hands improved significantly after individual atlas adjustment(s) and in the long term.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Apply the latest treatments, rehabilitation protocols, and expertise of leading surgeons and therapists to help your patients regain maximum movement after traumatic injuries or to improve limited functionality caused by chronic or acquired conditions[books.google.de]

Prognosis

  • Readers will find full information on the anatomy of the disease, the clinical picture, prevalence, diagnosis, prognosis, pathology, pathophysiology, and the author's personal treatment preferences, which are backed by 30 years of professional experience[books.google.de]
  • […] compression of the subclavian artery (near the first rib) Please find comprehensive information on Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention, prognosis[dovemed.com]
  • KEY WORDS Whiplash, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis.[ucam.edu]
  • But, once diagnosed using clinical symptoms, nerve conduction studies, electromyography and radiological investigations, it is a treatable condition with good prognosis.[annalsofian.org]
  • […] abnormalities axillosubclavian artery aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm arterial thrombus distal emboli enlarged collaterals fixed axillosubclavian artery stenosis at site of dynamic narrowing axillosubclavian artery narrowing with abduction Treatment and prognosis[radiopaedia.org]

Etiology

  • […] vicious circle; this concept was essentially abandoned in the 1950s, when actual causes, such as cervical radiculopathy and carpal tunnel syndrome, for upper extremity symptoms were appreciated, but resurrected in the 1980s, without attribution, as etiology[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • […] synonyms: TOS ICD-10 G54.0: Brachial plexus disorders TOS ICD-9 353.0 (Brachial plexus lesions; cerical rib syndrome, costoclavicular syndrome, scalenus anticus sydrome, thoracic outlet syndrome) TOS Etiology / Epidemiology / Natural History Etiology:[eorif.com]
  • Roos DB (1979) New concepts of thoracic outlet syndrome that explain etiology, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. Vasc Surg 13:313–321 Google Scholar 5. Riddel DH, Smith BM (1986) Thoracic and vascular aspects of thoracic outlet syndrome.[link.springer.com]
  • Etiology and Pathophysiology The interscalene triangle area is reduced in TOS and may become smaller during certain shoulder and arm movements. Fibrotic bands, cervical ribs, and muscle variations may further narrow the triangle.[unboundmedicine.com]

Epidemiology

  • Epidemiology Incidence Predominant age Neurogenic type (95%): 20 to 60 years Venous type (4%): 20 to 35 years Arterial type (1%; atherosclerosis): young adult or 50 years Predominant sex Neurogenic type: female male (3.5:1) Venous type: male female Arterial[unboundmedicine.com]
  • […] synonyms: TOS ICD-10 G54.0: Brachial plexus disorders TOS ICD-9 353.0 (Brachial plexus lesions; cerical rib syndrome, costoclavicular syndrome, scalenus anticus sydrome, thoracic outlet syndrome) TOS Etiology / Epidemiology / Natural History Etiology:[eorif.com]
  • Introduction Definition neurovascular disorder resulting from compression of the brachial plexus and/or subclavian vessels in the interval between the neck and axilla Epidemiology incidence 1-2% of the population demographics females males (3:1) tend[orthobullets.com]
  • Epidemiology Frequency United States The wide variability of symptoms and signs in patients with thoracic outlet syndrome and the lack of an objective confirmatory test for the diagnosis makes correctly identifying patients with thoracic outlet syndrome[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Epidemiology including risk factors and primary prevention Accurate diagnosis and incidence of TOS is difficult due to the absence of consistently reproducible objective measures.[now.aapmr.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Readers will find full information on the anatomy of the disease, the clinical picture, prevalence, diagnosis, prognosis, pathology, pathophysiology, and the author's personal treatment preferences, which are backed by 30 years of professional experience[books.google.de]
  • Etiology and Pathophysiology The interscalene triangle area is reduced in TOS and may become smaller during certain shoulder and arm movements. Fibrotic bands, cervical ribs, and muscle variations may further narrow the triangle.[unboundmedicine.com]
  • In the subsequent literature, however, TOS has been categorized into five clinically distinct variations, based on specific pathophysiology. These include arterial, venous, traumatic neurovascular, true neurogenic, and disputed.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Chronic and intermittent nerve compression has been studied in animal models, and has a well-described pathophysiology, as described by Susan Mackinnon, MD, currently at Washington University in St. Louis.[wcmc.com]
  • […] population demographics females males (3:1) tend to be thin with long necks and drooping shoulders age 20-60 type neurogenic is most common (95%) vascular may be venous (4%) or arterial ( 1%) more common in athletic males compared to athletic females Pathophysiology[orthobullets.com]

Prevention

  • […] from the compression of the subclavian artery (near the first rib) Please find comprehensive information on Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) regarding definition, distribution, risk factors, causes, signs & symptoms, diagnosis, complications, treatment, prevention[dovemed.com]
  • Prevent and plan for complications prior to a procedure thanks to a step-by-step approach to each procedure accompanied by relevant imaging studies.[books.google.de]
  • Include calcium in the diet to prevent osteoporosis. Some TOS types cannot be prevented such as in cases of a cervical rib, large lymph nodes and tumor in the upper chest. In these cases, prompt consultation is needed to prevent complications.[syndromespedia.com]
  • Treatment is required to treat or prevent acute thromboembolic events.[radiopaedia.org]
  • […] rapid weight loss with vigorous physical exertion and/or exercise, pendulous breasts Occupational exposure: computer users; musicians; repetitive work involving shoulders, arms, hands Young, thin females with long necks and drooping shoulders General Prevention[unboundmedicine.com]

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