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Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis

Kidney Pelvis Papilloma Transitional Cell


Presentation

  • We present a case of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the renal pelvis in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) who presented with hypercalcemia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • PTHrp-induced hypercalcaemia is associated with a grave prognosis, with a mean survival of 65 days from presentation.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • A review of the twelve published case reports of XPN with TCC of the renal pelvis, including the present case, showed that the frequency of this association is 3.3%, the average age at presentation is 65.3 (range 49-78) years, and that the male:female[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We present the case of a 61-year old man with intracranial recurrence of transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis presenting as diabetes insipidus.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The patient presented with gross hematuria, which resulted in a diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and tuberculosis of the contralateral kidney.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Aspiration
  • Abstract Five cases of histologically confirmed grade 1 papillary transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis investigated by needle aspiration biopsy cytology were reviewed. In all cases the needle aspirates were hypercellular.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The case also illustrates the importance of clinicopathologic correlation when interpreting fine needle aspiration biopsies.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Right Flank Pain
  • He also presented with intermittent, blunt, right flank pain and total gross hematuria lasting 1 year. He was a nonsmoker with no history of urolithiasis.[synapse.koreamed.org]
Skin Lesion
  • She received combination chemotherapy, but the size of her skin lesions was increasing. Three months after admission, she died. Metastasis to the skin from the renal pelvis is very rare; only four cases have been reported.[wjnu.org]
Subcutaneous Mass
  • Biopsy of the subcutaneous mass was performed, and the pathological findings showed transitional cell carcinoma. She was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the left renal pelvis with metastasis to the skin (cT4N0M1).[wjnu.org]
Back Pain
  • Cutaneous Metastases From Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis: A Case Report Abstract A 73-year-old female patient presented with left back pain.[wjnu.org]
  • These include: blood in the urine persistent back pain fatigue unexplained weight loss painful or frequent urination These symptoms are associated with malignant cancer of the ureter, but they’re also associated with other health conditions.[healthline.com]
  • It’s important to see your doctor if you experience: Blood in your urine Urination that’s painful or frequent Back pain that doesn’t go away Extreme fatigue Unexplained weight loss Tests and Diagnosis To determine your condition, your doctor may use a[webmd.com]
  • People with TCC often have the same signs and symptoms as people with renal cell cancer blood in the urine and, sometimes, back pain. For more information about transitional cell carcinoma, see Bladder Cancer.[cancer.org]
Suggestibility
  • However, the combination of a coarse, punctate pattern with a mucosal lesion on excretory or retrograde urography should suggest the diagnosis and prompt further investigation.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging findings suggested a diagnosis of TCC. The patient underwent left nephroureterectomy, which confirmed the diagnosis, and received adjuvant chemotherapy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Radiographic evaluation suggested a large bleeding renal mass that was thought to be renal cell carcinoma. Radical nephrectomy was performed after angio-embolization.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • This suggests that there is a widespread failure of differentiation of the urothelium to a much greater extent than can be appreciated by conventional light microscopy.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the high activity of tumor cell proliferation with rich neovascularization may be related to the high malignant potential of the cancer, and evaluation of cell proliferation combined with angiogenesis may be useful in[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Anger
  • Coleman BG, Anger PH, Mulhern CB, Pollack HM, Banner MP: Pyonephrosis: sonograph in the diagnosis and management. AJR 137 :939–943, 1981 Google Scholar 19. Mitty HA, Baron MG, Feller M: Infiltrating carcinoma of the renal pelvis.[link.springer.com]
Dizziness
  • A 73-year-old man was referred to the Sanggye Paik Hospital Emergency Center for evaluation of dizziness and general weakness. He also presented with intermittent, blunt, right flank pain and total gross hematuria lasting 1 year.[synapse.koreamed.org]
Hematuria
  • The patient presented with gross hematuria, which resulted in a diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and tuberculosis of the contralateral kidney.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • A 56-year-old man with painless hematuria was found to have a papillary transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis with an accompanying nodule composed of multinucleated and mononuclear cells, resembling a giant cell tumor of bone.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The presenting symptom was hematuria in 2 patients, while in 2 diagnosis was made by chance at excretory urography.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The two patients with gross hematuria were diagnosed with a tumor in preoperative imaging (CT) and underwent radical nephrectomy.[synapse.koreamed.org]
  • Of the patients 18 presented with hematuria and 6 had bilateral upper tract tumors. After percutaneous resection, the access tract was irradiated either with iridium wire in 12 patients or a commercial high dose rate radiation delivery system in 12.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Flank Pain
  • He also presented with intermittent, blunt, right flank pain and total gross hematuria lasting 1 year. He was a nonsmoker with no history of urolithiasis.[synapse.koreamed.org]
  • References: [10] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [11] [3] [12] [4] Pathology Differential diagnoses Other causes of hematuria and flank pain References: [13] [18] The differential diagnoses listed here are not exhaustive.[amboss.com]
  • They may also present with dull flank pain or acute renal colic due to obstruction. Transitional cell carcinoma is predominantly a disease of older people. Men are affected three time more often than women.[sonoworld.com]
  • TCC of the kidney and ureter may give rise to flank pain (and haematuria) as a result of urinary tract obstruction. Investigations USS and CT Analysis of urine for malignant cells.[almostadoctor.co.uk]
  • […] cancer (HNPCC) related tumors CLINICAL ISSUES Epidemiology Incidence 4-5% of all urothelial tumors Most common type of tumor in pelvicalyceal (90%) location Age Mean: 67-70 years (range: 34-93 years) Gender More common in males; M:F 1.7-2:1 Presentation Flank[basicmedicalkey.com]

Treatment

  • The other 13 patients had asked for a conservative treatment approach to be adopted.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Most available data are from retrospective studies and surgery is the mainstay of treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • PURPOSE: The application of conservative surgery has been established in the treatment of transitional cell tumors of the renal pelvis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Cytological, radiographic and endoscopic studies were negative 11, 13, 18 and 24 months after the treatment, respectively.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • In the hands of an experienced urologist, such procedures can provide reliable treatment options for small upper urinary tract lesions.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Prognosis

  • AIM: To investigate the clinical significance of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) expression in the assessment of the pathological outcomes and prognosis of carcinoma of the renal pelvis through examination of ALDH1 expression in pathological specimens[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • BACKGROUND: The significance of p53 overexpression for the prognosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the renal pelvis and ureter remains controversial.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The determination of DNA ploidy, tumor heterogeneity and tumor cell proliferation by means of DNA cytophotometry affords valuable clues as to prognosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • This grouping should help in predicting prognosis and avoid the overdiagnosis of sarcoma or undifferentiated carcinoma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • CONCLUSION: Despite the poor prognosis, two years after surgery patient is without signs of primary disease or metastasis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Etiology

  • Epidemiology and etiology of bladder cancer. Urol Clin North Am 1992; 19:421-428. Grant DC, Dee GJ, Yoder IC, Newhouse Sonography of transitional cell carcinoma the renal pelvis.[sonoworld.com]
  • ., pregnant women), or if etiology of hematuria is unlikely to be malignancy (e.g., younger people, no risk factors) MR urography (with gadolinium) contrast : in patients who have contrast allergy Retrograde urethrogram : detects location and extent of[amboss.com]
  • TERMINOLOGY Abbreviations Urothelial carcinoma of renal pelvis (UCP) Definitions Malignant neoplasm of urothelial (transitional cell) origin involving renal pelvicalyceal system ETIOLOGY/PATHOGENESIS Risk Factors Tobacco smoking is important risk factor[basicmedicalkey.com]
  • Discussion Hypercalcemia of malignancy is not an uncommon etiology of hypercalcemia in an inpatient setting. The tumor generally presents with abrupt onset, severe symptoms and high serum calcium concentration of 14 mg/dl.[karger.com]
  • […] long-standing analgesic-induced renal papillary pathology) provided an opportunity to examine the temporal relation between phenacetin exposure and those histologic characteristics of the tumors and adjacent renal tissue that may implicate analgesics in their etiology[thedoctorsdoctor.com]

Epidemiology

  • Epidemiology Urothelial cancer ; is the most common tumor of the urinary tract.[amboss.com]
  • Epidemiology and etiology of bladder cancer. Urol Clin North Am 1992; 19:421-428. Grant DC, Dee GJ, Yoder IC, Newhouse Sonography of transitional cell carcinoma the renal pelvis.[sonoworld.com]
  • Epidemiology Uncommon before the age of 40, only 5% of cases present before the age of 60. Male to female ratio 4:1 Incidence is about 32 per 100 000 in men, and 10 per 100 000 in women.[almostadoctor.co.uk]
  • […] inverted tumor growth pattern Upper urinary tract tumors form 3rd most common tumor with microsatellite instability Colon and endometrium are 2 most common sites within hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) related tumors CLINICAL ISSUES Epidemiology[basicmedicalkey.com]
  • Epidemiology of transitional cell carcinomas of the renal pelvis is similar to those of the rest of the urinary tract: please refer to TCCs of urinary tract for further details.[radiopaedia.org]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • References Healy KA, Ogan K: Pathophysiology and management of infectious staghorn calculi. Urol Clin North Am 2007;34:363-374.[karger.com]

Prevention

  • This aims to reduce bladder recurrence and also prevents tumour progression. 21 Similarly, for UTUC, the concept of postoperative instillation therapy translates to post-RNU bladder instillation.[esmoopen.bmj.com]
  • These can include: chemotherapy anticancer drugs biological therapies that kill cancer cells or prevent them from growing The outlook for someone diagnosed with cancer of the renal pelvis and ureter depends on a number of factors that your doctor will[healthline.com]
  • However, adjuvant chemotherapy can reduce bladder recurrence, thereby preventing transurethral resection of recurrent bladder tumors and intravesical therapy.[jcancer.org]
  • Measures that may help prevent this cancer include: Follow your provider's advice regarding medicines, including over-the-counter pain medicine. Stop smoking.[medlineplus.gov]
  • Chemotherapy Topical chemotherapy and immunotherapy In bladder cancer, drugs can be inserted in the bladder to prevent cancer from coming back. But they are not often used for renal pelvis or ureteral cancer.[urologyhealth.org]

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